Hospitals Deal with Covid

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Volkonski
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Hospitals Deal with Covid

#1

Post by Volkonski »




NPR
@NPR
·
10m
Scores of U.S. hospitals are looking for nurses abroad to ease shortages caused by COVID. The demand is so great that it's created a backlog of 5,000 international nurses awaiting approval to enter the U.S.


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Re: Hospitals Deal with Covid

#2

Post by bill_g »

I had several calls to our local hospitals this week. Every one had their ambulance aprons filled with EMS delivering new patients. They were all adding security personnel to address the increased covid denier protests and internet medical experts presence. I've become a covid profiteer without trying.


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Re: Hospitals Deal with Covid

#3

Post by Volkonski »

Omicron on track to shatter Texas' COVID-19 hospitalization record
“The situation in Texas is that it probably won’t reach the peak [for cases] until the second half of January,” a top researcher said.


https://www.texastribune.org/2022/01/07 ... -capacity/
Pandemic forecasters in Texas say the state’s current surge of omicron infections and hospitalizations is likely to get much worse before it gets better, with hospitalizations expected to continue climbing for at least three weeks if social behaviors don’t change and slow the trend.

Across the nation, hospitalizations are already on the verge of breaking new pandemic records. In Texas on Thursday, according to state data, about 9,200 people were hospitalized with COVID-19 — far short of the record 14,218 hospitalizations from Jan. 11, 2021.

But with current numbers climbing exponentially each week, hospitalizations of Texans with COVID are likely to follow national trends and surpass previous levels in the state before they start to decline, said Anass Bouchnita, a researcher at the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium, which uses data and research to project the path of the pandemic nationally.

The number of Texans testing positive for the virus every day is already at an all-time high, reaching a seven-day average of almost 44,000 confirmed cases on Friday. The seven-day average of new confirmed cases during the peak of the delta surge back in September was over 15,000.


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Re: Hospitals Deal with Covid

#4

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Austin area Hospitals prepare for omicron surge

https://cbsaustin.com/news/local/austin ... cron-surge
Some health officials predicted a COVID surge in the next coming says but Austin’s Health Department says central Texas is already there. They are now in constant communication with hospitals and elected officials to coordinate resources and assistance to prevent hospitals from becoming overwhelmed.

Austin’s major health care providers tell us they’re already seeing an increase of covid-19 patients which is creating a further strain on hospital staffing. Ascension Texas, Baylor Scott & White Health and St. David’s says each hospital has a surge plan that will use all available patient care space and in other healthcare system settings. In addition, they are closely working with Austin public health to set up an alternate care site that’s ready to open should the need arise. Austin public health says the duration of this surge is largely dependent upon community behavior and they estimate it could be at least late February if not march before they see relief.


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Re: Hospitals Deal with Covid

#5

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Rio Grande Valley-

Covid impacting shortage of hospital staff in Cameron County

https://www.krgv.com/news/covid-impacti ... on-county/
Many hospital employees are testing positive for the disease and have to stay home.

"It's a larger number of employees that are out at one time,” Harlingen Medical Center Chief Nursing Officer Amy Flores said. “Before, the number was a little smaller. So, that does impact staffing and impacts being able to open up all the beds and taking care of patients in the community."

Flores said the hospital only has about 75% of its staffing to take care of the beds that they do have.

"We're two years in and a lot of people are tired, and some people have left the profession or have left their local jobs and have taken on traveling jobs because it definitely pays more," Cameron County Health Authority Dr. James Castillo said.


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Re: Hospitals Deal with Covid

#6

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Omicron surge pushes U.S. COVID hospitalizations toward record high

https://www.reuters.com/world/us/omicro ... 022-01-07/
COVID-19 hospitalizations in the United States are poised to hit a new high as early as Friday, according to a Reuters tally, surpassing the record set in January of last year as the highly contagious Omicron variant fuels a surge in infections.

Hospitalizations have increased steadily since late December as Omicron quickly overtook Delta as the dominant coronavirus variant in the United States, although experts say Omicron will likely prove less deadly than prior iterations.

Health officials have nevertheless warned that the sheer number of infections caused by Omicron was placing a strain on hospitals, some of which are struggling to keep up with the influx of patients because their own workers are out sick.

"It's sort of like medical throughput gridlock," Dr. Peter Dillon, the chief clinical officer at Penn State Health in Pennsylvania, said in an interview. "There (are) so many forces now contributing to the challenges and I think there's an element, I don't want to say despair, but of fatigue."


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#7

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Houston hospitals report record number of pediatric COVID-19 hospitalizations
New cases broke records at facilities including Texas Children's Hospital. More than 800 patients tested positive in the last 24 hours.


https://www.khou.com/article/news/healt ... f103dc8fb5

New York State DOH report shows sharp rise in pediatric hospitalizations for COVID-19



Kansas City MO
Children's Mercy sees increase in COVID hospitalizations and staff case



Jayne Miller
@jemillerwbal
Number of kids in hospitals in Maryland with Covid up 281% in past 2 weeks

12,945 new Covid cases in Maryland

49 additional deaths

Positivity increases to 29.29%

Hospitalizations increase to 3306.
61 are kids

Most are unvaccinated

Alabama hospitals, ICUs starting to feel crush of omicron; 48 children hospitalized with COVID

https://www.al.com/news/2022/01/alabama ... covid.html

Children’s Hospital of Richmond at VCU sees more COVID-19 cases

https://www.nbc12.com/2022/01/08/childr ... -19-cases/

Record-high number of children hospitalized with COVID in St. Louis area



As COVID cases rise dramatically among kids, here’s what Illinois parents need to know

https://www.wbez.org/stories/what-illin ... 51e1765f2f

'We're just a sitting duck': UW Health pediatrician says child COVID-19 vaccination rates are too low
Pediatric hospitalizations for COVID-19 are up in Wisconsin, across the country


https://www.wpr.org/were-just-sitting-d ... re-too-low

Maine hospitals see increase of children with COVID

https://wgme.com/news/local/maine-hospi ... with-covid

North Carolina
Doctors urge parents to vaccinate children ages 5-17 after rise in pediatric COVID-19 cases

https://abc11.com/pediatric-covid-covid ... /11438375/


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Re: Hospitals Deal with Covid

#8

Post by Volkonski »

Hospitals Are in Serious Trouble
Omicron is inundating a health-care system that was already buckling under the cumulative toll of every previous surge.


https://www.theatlantic.com/health/arch ... rs/621193/
When a health-care system crumbles, this is what it looks like. Much of what’s wrong happens invisibly. At first, there’s just a lot of waiting. Emergency rooms get so full that “you’ll wait hours and hours, and you may not be able to get surgery when you need it,” Megan Ranney, an emergency physician in Rhode Island, told me. When patients are seen, they might not get the tests they need, because technicians or necessary chemicals are in short supply. Then delay becomes absence. The little acts of compassion that make hospital stays tolerable disappear. Next go the acts of necessity that make stays survivable. Nurses might be so swamped that they can’t check whether a patient has their pain medications or if a ventilator is working correctly. People who would’ve been fine will get sicker. Eventually, people who would have lived will die. This is not conjecture; it is happening now, across the United States. “It’s not a dramatic Armageddon; it happens inch by inch,” Anand Swaminathan, an emergency physician in New Jersey, told me.

In this surge, COVID-19 hospitalizations rose slowly at first, from about 40,000 nationally in early November to 65,000 on Christmas. But with the super-transmissible Delta variant joined by the even-more-transmissible Omicron, the hospitalization count has shot up to 110,000 in the two weeks since then. “The volume of people presenting to our emergency rooms is unlike anything I’ve ever seen before,” Kit Delgado, an emergency physician in Pennsylvania, told me. Health-care workers in 11 different states echoed what he said: Already, this surge is pushing their hospitals to the edge. And this is just the beginning. Hospitalizations always lag behind cases by about two weeks, so we’re only starting to see the effects of daily case counts that have tripled in the past 14 days (and are almost certainly underestimates). By the end of the month, according to the CDC’s forecasts, COVID will be sending at least 24,700 and up to 53,700 Americans to the hospital every single day.

This surge is, in many ways, distinct from the ones before. About 62 percent of Americans are fully vaccinated, and are still mostly protected against the coronavirus’s worst effects. When people do become severely ill, health-care workers have a better sense of what to expect and what to do. Omicron itself seems to be less severe than previous variants, and many of the people now testing positive don’t require hospitalization. But such cases threaten to obscure this surge’s true cost.

Omicron is so contagious that it is still flooding hospitals with sick people. And America’s continued inability to control the coronavirus has deflated its health-care system, which can no longer offer the same number of patients the same level of care. Health-care workers have quit their jobs in droves; of those who have stayed, many now can’t work, because they have Omicron breakthrough infections. “In the last two years, I’ve never known as many colleagues who have COVID as I do now,” Amanda Bettencourt, the president-elect of the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses, told me. “The staffing crisis is the worst it has been through the pandemic.” This is why any comparisons between past and present hospitalization numbers are misleading: January 2021’s numbers would crush January 2022’s system because the workforce has been so diminished. Some institutions are now being overwhelmed by a fraction of their earlier patient loads. “I hope no one you know or love gets COVID or needs an emergency room right now, because there’s no room,” Janelle Thomas, an ICU nurse in Maryland, told me.


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Re: Hospitals Deal with Covid

#9

Post by Volkonski »

Dam Is Full And Springing Leaks: Mississippi Doctors Say Health System Broken Since Delta

https://www.mississippifreepress.org/19 ... nce-delta/
This stage of the pandemic, for many of Mississippi’s rural hospitals, is structurally different from anything that has come before. Before, in the early surges, and in delta especially, it was worst in the flagship hospitals—UMMC, Baptist, Singing River—inundated by swells of the critically sick. With delta, ICUs spilled out into field hospitals, such was the burden of severe COVID.

This is something else—not a tsunami, but a river slowly rising. Of course, omicron swarms hospitals with COVID patients like every other variant, but in aggregate the symptoms are not as horrendous, the clearance time is shorter. On this, the rural hospital workers who spoke to the Mississippi Free Press for this story agreed.

But the state of the hospital system, especially on the periphery, is significantly worse. A North Mississippi hospital director, who spoke to the Mississippi Free Press on background, explained that the cracks in the system have grown over the pandemic and that omicron was exploiting them.

“I’ve never seen anything like this in all my years of care. I’ve thought a lot about (how this surge compares) this week—I had minimal staff who contracted the virus in the first wave. Now, with omicron, there’s no containing it. It’s an uncontrollable wildfire,” the director said.


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#10

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Arizona Doctor: We are in a crisis. The hospital system will collapse.

https://www.kold.com/2022/01/08/arizona ... -collapse/
Dr. Snedecor and more than 1,100 Arizona healthcare workers want more consistent mitigation measures to help ease the strain on Arizona’s hospitals.

“We have gotten really creative with the resources we had at our availability. We stretched the use of PPE. I don’t think, actually, I know, there’s no more back up plan. This is it. We are at collapse,” Dr. Snedecor said.

The letter, in part, asks hospital systems to adjust and enforce consistent hospital visitation policies, require N95 masks for everyone working in patient care areas and KN95 masking for visitors, provide access to rapid response COVID-19 testing within health care facilities for workers, and enact efforts to stabilize, recruit, train and retain healthcare workforce to improve staffing.

Dr. Snedecor said on Friday morning, she learned two admitting physicians were diagnosed with COVID-19 meaning they had no one to admit patient into the hospital.


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Re: Hospitals Deal with Covid

#11

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above wrote: The demand is so great that it's created a backlog of 5,000 international nurses awaiting approval to enter the U.S.
Hmmm - US or UK - Brexit is the question :confuzzled:


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Re: Hospitals Deal with Covid

#12

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Omicron explosion spurs nationwide breakdown of services

https://apnews.com/article/coronavirus- ... ce=Twitter
Ambulances in Kansas speed toward hospitals then suddenly change direction because hospitals are full. Employee shortages in New York City cause delays in trash and subway services and diminish the ranks of firefighters and emergency workers. Airport officials shut down security checkpoints at the biggest terminal in Phoenix and schools across the nation struggle to find teachers for their classrooms.

The current explosion of omicron-fueled coronavirus infections in the U.S. is causing a breakdown in basic functions and services — the latest illustration of how COVID-19 keeps upending life more than two years into the pandemic.

“This really does, I think, remind everyone of when COVID-19 first appeared and there were such major disruptions across every part of our normal life,” said Tom Cotter, director of emergency response and preparedness at the global health nonprofit Project HOPE. “And the unfortunate reality is, there’s no way of predicting what will happen next until we get our vaccination numbers — globally — up.”

First responders, hospitals, schools and government agencies have employed an all-hands-on-deck approach to keep the public safe, but they are worried how much longer they can keep it up.
Dr. Steve Stites, chief medical officer for the University of Kansas Hospital, said when the leader of a rural hospital had no place to send its dialysis patients this week, the hospital’s staff consulted a textbook and “tried to put in some catheters and figure out how to do it.”

Medical facilities have been hit by a “double whammy,” he said. The number of COVID-19 patients at the University of Kansas Hospital rose from 40 on Dec. 1 to 139 on Friday. At the same time, more than 900 employees have been sickened with COVID-19 or are awaiting test results — 7% of the hospital’s 13,500-person workforce.


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Re: Hospitals Deal with Covid

#13

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COVID Surge: 52 out of 62 hospitals that LAFD dispatches to are currently on diversion

https://www.foxla.com/news/covid-surge- ... -diversion
The surge is greatly impacting frontline workers, hundreds of officers and firefighters are out sick due to COVID, and it’s adding more stress for nurses and doctors.

Dr. Janice DaVolio runs a private dermatology practice. She’s rescheduling less urgent patients, saying no to anyone without a mask, trying to make sure she and her staff stay healthy.

The Chief Operating Officer at Cedars Sinai Medical Center says COVID-19 among doctors, nurses, and staff has increased significantly.

"The incidents of COVID amongst our staff is really reflective of the incidents in the community," said Dr. Jeffrey Smith, COO of Cedars Sinai.


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#14

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Staffs of Maryland hospitals, stressed and sickened with COVID-19, know ‘cavalry’ isn’t coming

https://www.baltimoresun.com/coronaviru ... story.html
As COVID-19 hospitalizations climb into uncharted territory, fueled by the highly contagious omicron variant, Maryland’s medical work force is increasingly diminished by illness and exposure, burnout and turnover.

Gov. Larry Hogan has responded with pleas for people to get vaccinated and boosted and wear masks to spare the hospitals. The state opened several testing sites near hospitals so people would stop flooding emergency rooms with nonemergencies.

Hogan’s also sending Maryland National Guard troops to hospitals to perform nonmedical tasks and relaxing guardrails on licenses for medical workers, particularly nurses.

Some criticized the Republican governor’s moves as insufficient, while a few worried about patient safety. And while others welcome the efforts and flexibility, some fear there just won’t be relief through the surge.


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#15

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Latest on COVID-19 in MN: Active cases leap; hospitals 'literally full'

https://www.mprnews.org/story/2022/01/0 ... id19-in-mn
The newest state Health Department figures show new cases averaging more than 5,000 a day the past seven reporting days; known, active cases came in at more than 44,000 — the highest since just after Thanksgiving 2020 and 11,000 more than a week ago.

The percentage of COVID tests coming back positive is trending at about 10 percent, according to MPR News calculations — about twice the 5 percent officials find concerning.

“The omicron surge has most definitely reached Minnesota,” Minnesota Health Commissioner Jan Malcolm told reporters Friday. She said it’s spreading “like wildfire” here and across the country and “we just need to expect that it’s going to be the norm for us in coming weeks.”

While omicron appears to cause less severe illness, Malcolm said it remained a danger to the unvaccinated and medically vulnerable people and that hospitals and care centers would remain under strain in the coming weeks. She estimated omicron was responsible for about 90 percent of Minnesota’s new case counts.

:snippity:

On Friday, the Minnesota Hospital Association begged people not to come to emergency rooms seeking COVID tests or other nonemergency care, noting a “high volume” of patients driving up wait times for medical emergencies at several hospitals.

“We have run out of words to describe what we are undergoing — a crisis does not even come close,” the group said, adding, “hospitals are literally full … ICUs are full, emergency departments are full, medical-surgical units are full, hallways are full, and surgeries are being canceled.”


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Re: Hospitals Deal with Covid

#16

Post by sugar magnolia »

Volkonski wrote: Sat Jan 08, 2022 12:03 pm Dam Is Full And Springing Leaks: Mississippi Doctors Say Health System Broken Since Delta

https://www.mississippifreepress.org/19 ... nce-delta/
This stage of the pandemic, for many of Mississippi’s rural hospitals, is structurally different from anything that has come before. Before, in the early surges, and in delta especially, it was worst in the flagship hospitals—UMMC, Baptist, Singing River—inundated by swells of the critically sick. With delta, ICUs spilled out into field hospitals, such was the burden of severe COVID.

This is something else—not a tsunami, but a river slowly rising. Of course, omicron swarms hospitals with COVID patients like every other variant, but in aggregate the symptoms are not as horrendous, the clearance time is shorter. On this, the rural hospital workers who spoke to the Mississippi Free Press for this story agreed.

But the state of the hospital system, especially on the periphery, is significantly worse. A North Mississippi hospital director, who spoke to the Mississippi Free Press on background, explained that the cracks in the system have grown over the pandemic and that omicron was exploiting them.

“I’ve never seen anything like this in all my years of care. I’ve thought a lot about (how this surge compares) this week—I had minimal staff who contracted the virus in the first wave. Now, with omicron, there’s no containing it. It’s an uncontrollable wildfire,” the director said.
There was a wreck the other night with one of the drivers ejected from the vehicle and lying on the ground. The cops called for an ambulance and were told they were 11th call in line up for dispatch. Breaking all protocols known to man, they were advised to have someone transport her by private vehicle so she didn't die on the side of the road. It's not just covidiots suffering.

About a month ago, we called an ambulance for my husband because he couldn't breath and was turning blue 2 days before he had 1.5 litres of fluid drained off his lung, waited almost 2 hours and then called back and cancelled. It was just a few days after one of my chemo treatments and I did not have the strength to get him in the car, and was under strict instructions to not go anywhere near a hospital since I was at my lowest point of immunity.

Fuck these people clogging up the hospitals unnecessarily.


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Re: Hospitals Deal with Covid

#17

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:bighug:

Yeah, there's probably that times 10,000 going on today. :mad:


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Re: Hospitals Deal with Covid

#18

Post by LM K »

bill_g wrote: Sat Jan 08, 2022 9:45 am I had several calls to our local hospitals this week. Every one had their ambulance aprons filled with EMS delivering new patients. They were all adding security personnel to address the increased covid denier protests and internet medical experts presence. I've become a covid profiteer without trying.
This is insane. It's not just butter's ideology that's killing people. Now their physical presence is risking other's lives.


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#19

Post by LM K »

Oregon just released it's triage plan. It's based almost entirely on possiblity of survival.

The state is expecting current surge hospitalization numbers to peak at the end of Jan.
:snippity:
It directs hospitals to rank patients by evaluating the likelihood of their short-term survival to hospital discharge.

In the event of a tie between two patients who need the same resources, the person already receiving care would continue to get it, unless their condition had worsened.

In ties between two patients with similar conditions presenting at the same time, the triage tool uses randomization to decide who gets care.
:snippity:

In contrast with standards adopted by many other states, Oregon’s standards do not prioritize any particular groups of people for lifesaving care. Other states, for example, award more points to pregnant people, those under 18, health care workers, or single parents.
:snippity:


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Re: Hospitals Deal with Covid

#20

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Re: Hospitals Deal with Covid

#21

Post by Fiona »

I wonder how many people understand how close we are to a collapse of the HC system. Closer than most of the populous understands, IMO.


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#22

Post by Fiona »

LM K wrote: Sat Jan 08, 2022 4:57 pm Oregon just released it's triage plan. It's based almost entirely on possiblity of survival.

The state is expecting current surge hospitalization numbers to peak at the end of Jan.
:snippity:
It directs hospitals to rank patients by evaluating the likelihood of their short-term survival to hospital discharge.

In the event of a tie between two patients who need the same resources, the person already receiving care would continue to get it, unless their condition had worsened.

In ties between two patients with similar conditions presenting at the same time, the triage tool uses randomization to decide who gets care.
:snippity:

In contrast with standards adopted by many other states, Oregon’s standards do not prioritize any particular groups of people for lifesaving care. Other states, for example, award more points to pregnant people, those under 18, health care workers, or single parents.
:snippity:
Indeed. This is where I live and practice. Not looking forward to crisis standards but given the scope of where we are, there isn’t a choice.


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Re: Hospitals Deal with Covid

#23

Post by LM K »

Fiona wrote: Sat Jan 08, 2022 10:23 pm Indeed. This is where I live and practice. Not looking forward to crisis standards but given the scope of where we are, there isn’t a choice.
I'm sorry you're in the thick of this. What an impossible situation. :bighug:


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#24

Post by raison de arizona »

► Show Spoiler
75% of maternity unit moms are COVID+, so the babies and their brand new immune systems are at risk. Oh and half of the nurses are out with COVID. NICU is on divert. L&D is on divert (didn't know that could happen!) Like watching a slow-motion tsunami and there's nowhere to run.

Lauren Michele
@EmpressAPGAR
For everyone asking, I'm rotating at a major hospital in mid-Atlantic. Moms & babies will be separated if babies need the NICU while divert is on. If COVID+, babies are kept behind glass screen 6ft. away from mom in the room. It's all heartbreaking.
► Show Spoiler
If you still have any doubt about how bad things are (and getting worse) in hospitals, consider this new @DignityHealthAZ memo sent to Medical & Allied Health Staff because of the 'Critical Staff Crisis'.

Basically come to work even if you're infected w/ #COVID but wear an N95.
Image


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Re: Hospitals Deal with Covid

#25

Post by bill_g »

LM K wrote: Sat Jan 08, 2022 3:39 pm
bill_g wrote: Sat Jan 08, 2022 9:45 am I had several calls to our local hospitals this week. Every one had their ambulance aprons filled with EMS delivering new patients. They were all adding security personnel to address the increased covid denier protests and internet medical experts presence. I've become a covid profiteer without trying.
This is insane. It's not just butter's ideology that's killing people. Now their physical presence is risking other's lives.
Yep. Famdamly members are sometimes vehemently directing staff on the proper treatment protocols. Absolute looney tunes.


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