Brexit

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RTH10260
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Re: Brexit

#626

Post by RTH10260 »

‘Brexit to blame’: UK shoppers pay up to 50% more than those in EU
From Zara to Ikea and Decathlon, stores charge more for same items, Guardian Money research finds

Patrick Collinson
Sat 30 Jul 2022 12.00 BST

Zara is charging British shoppers as much as 50% more than in Spain, while Decathlon partly blames Brexit for markups on e-bikes that can be up to £250 pricier in the UK than in France.

The figures come from a snapshot survey by Guardian Money that examined prices of popular items at pan-European retailers including Ikea, Apple, JD Sports, and H&M, as well as Zara and Decathlon. It compared prices in the UK, Germany, France, Spain, Italy and Ireland.

It found that while at some retailers, such as JD Sports, prices are broadly similar across Britain and the EU countries, at others prices in the UK are markedly higher. None of the retailers had generally lower prices in the UK.

The findings add another twist to the current UK cost of living crisis.

Zara, Europe’s biggest clothing retailer, has some of the biggest percentage price differentials between the UK and the rest of Europe.



https://www.theguardian.com/money/2022/ ... -decathlon


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RTH10260
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Re: Brexit

#627

Post by RTH10260 »

Radio show host, a week ago, when "Dover" made its appearance



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RTH10260
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Re: Brexit

#628

Post by RTH10260 »

The happy British fish :biggrin:
Scottish salmon industry urges ministers to act over Dover delays
Action urged over Brexit-related delays of up to 48 hours caused by queues on the UK side of Channel

Lisa O'Carroll Brexit correspondent
Tue 2 Aug 2022 19.00 BST

The Scottish salmon industry has called on ministers to urgently intervene to stop Brexit-related delays to the transportation of fresh fish to France.

It comes after the Brexit opportunities minister, Jacob Rees-Mogg, admitted he was wrong to say there would be no delays at the port of Dover caused by the UK leaving the EU.

Tavish Scott, chief executive of trade body Scottish Salmon, held a meeting with the fisheries minister Victoria Prentis on Tuesday morning after fish became stuck in the gridlock on Kent roads a fortnight ago.

“Fresh salmon from Scotland will normally arrive in France the following morning, but in recent weeks there have been delays of up to 48 hours due to queues on the UK side of the Channel – and there are concerns of repeat problems,” the organisation said in a statement.

Normally fresh salmon would be available to the chefs in France, the biggest market, within three days of harvesting. But the industry says the past two weeks have seen days when it has been unable to get fish into France at all.




https://www.theguardian.com/politics/20 ... ver-delays


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RTH10260
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Re: Brexit

#629

Post by RTH10260 »

:blackeye:
‘Science superpower’ plan risks making UK bureaucracy superpower, says peer
Author of Lords report says government’s approach ‘feels like setting off on a marathon with your shoelaces tied together’


Ian Sample Science editor
Thu 4 Aug 2022 00.01 BST

Britain’s plan to become a “science and technology superpower” is so lacking in focus and so full of new organisational structures that the country risks becoming a “bureaucracy superpower” instead, an influential crossbench peer has said.

Prof John Krebs, the co-author of a Lords report on the government’s global ambitions for science and technology, said despite laudable rhetoric, there was no clear strategy as to how the “superpower” ambition might be realised, and reasons to doubt it would succeed.




https://www.theguardian.com/science/202 ... -says-peer


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Foggy
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Re: Brexit

#630

Post by Foggy »

Maybe they could rename it "Space Force"?


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RTH10260
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Re: Brexit

#631

Post by RTH10260 »

'Brexit bonus' plan to allow motorists to drive HGVs without extra tests to help solve driver shortages

5 August 2022, 08:30
By Stephen Rigley

Motorists are set to be allowed to drive lorries without taking a test under a “Brexit bonus” plan to help solve driver shortages.

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps will launch a consultation on whether to lift the Brussels-imposed ban on motorists driving anything larger than a 3.5-ton vehicle.

It means motorists cannot drive vans and lorries up to 7.5 tons without taking further tests, or minibuses with up to 16 seats without restrictions.

Mr Shapps believes lifting the ban could increase the pool of commercial drivers, boosting job opportunities and the economy. It could also help address shortages of HGV drivers because some may graduate to drive heavy goods vehicles.




https://www.lbc.co.uk/news/brexit-bonus ... to-help-s/


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raison de arizona
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Re: Brexit

#632

Post by raison de arizona »

I dunno about putting folks behind the wheel of a fifteen thousand pound truck without ensuring that they are qualified to drive it. Seems like a bad idea overall. Especially the first time one of those untested drivers gets in a wreck and kills someone, God forbid.


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Re: Brexit

#633

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Almost 35,000 Britons in limbo as Portugal fails to issue post-Brexit ID cards
British nationals living in country are unable to access healthcare, change jobs or travel in and out

Lisa O'Carroll Brexit correspondent
Sat 6 Aug 2022 11.08 BST

British nationals living in Portugal are unable to access healthcare, change jobs, or travel in and out of the country as its ministers have not issued them with post-Brexit residency cards, it has emerged.

The UK government has raised the issue at ministerial level and urged Portugal to implement fully the withdrawal agreement and protect the rights of the 34,500 Britons who made the country their home before Brexit.

People have been left detained at airports, paying to have broken bones treated or risked losing their jobs due to the delays in getting a biometric card that is vital to everyday life and proves their legal status.

Under the UK-EU withdrawal agreement, British citizens in Portugal were guaranteed their social and employment rights would be protected. However, the Portuguese government has yet to provide the biometric residency cards.Instead, a temporary document and QR code has been issued, which Britons say is not recognised locally or at international borders.





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Sam the Centipede
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Re: Brexit

#634

Post by Sam the Centipede »

raison de arizona wrote: Fri Aug 05, 2022 7:38 pm I dunno about putting folks behind the wheel of a fifteen thousand pound truck without ensuring that they are qualified to drive it. Seems like a bad idea overall. Especially the first time one of those untested drivers gets in a wreck and kills someone, God forbid.
It appears that many older folk who acquired their car driving licenses about 30 years or more ago already can, even if they never have done. When more restrictive rules came into force, existing licensees retained those rights.

The UK's change will not be recognized in the EU – cue "how dare they!" squeals from Brexiters!


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Sam the Centipede
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Re: Brexit

#635

Post by Sam the Centipede »

RTH10260 wrote: Fri Aug 05, 2022 7:55 am :blackeye:
‘Science superpower’ plan risks making UK bureaucracy superpower, says peer
:snippity:
Much of modern science is cooperative and international which means a UK stand-alone effort is doomed. The EU and other European agencies have tried to keep the UK in play – their staff support their colleagues – but this UK government is incapable of mature negotiation and soon exhausts the patience of well-meaning friends.

Couple that with the hostile approach to international students, who won't now have the attractive opportunities they expected, and the UK is on a serious downward trajectory in these areas.

The UK has also blown the opportunity to host international bodies, bringing both expertise and prestige into their country. When Brexit happened the UK was favorite to host a European medical agency (safety of drugs or something like that); that went down the pan.


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Re: Brexit

#636

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British farmers face paying for border checkpoints in EU after Brexit halts exports
British pedigree livestock breeders may have to invest in their own ‘red tape’ facilities in France to reach EU market

James Tapper
Sat 6 Aug 2022 17.00 BST

British farmers exporting livestock to the continent are trying to set up facilities for “red tape” checks by vets in France costing millions of pounds – and may even pay for it themselves.

Breeders in Britain are unable to export their pedigree cattle, sheep and pigs to the EU because no one has built any border control posts where vets can check the animals before they enter the single market.

No private company in France has been prepared so far to invest the millions of euros needed to build a facility, bringing British exports to the European mainland to a halt since Brexit.

Now the National Farmers’ Union (NFU) is planning to ask farmers if they will help fund the facility themselves. Meanwhile, some breeders say they have only months left before shutting down their export operations, while others are relocating to the EU.

John Royle, chief livestock adviser to the NFU, has been trying to rescue British farmers who specialise in breeding prize-winning cattle, sheep and pigs that are then used to establish their own herds and flocks.




https://www.theguardian.com/politics/20 ... ts-exports


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Azastan
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Re: Brexit

#637

Post by Azastan »

All those unintended consequences. Must make for some interesting discussions at tea time!


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Ben-Prime
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Re: Brexit

#638

Post by Ben-Prime »

Azastan wrote: Sun Aug 07, 2022 1:05 pm All those unintended consequences. Must make for some interesting discussions at tea time!
Leopards and faces, equally a thing in the UK.


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And the truth shall ever come uppermost,
And justice shall be done.

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Re: Brexit

#639

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“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.” ― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace
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tek
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Re: Brexit

#640

Post by tek »

Off Topic
Barker Rum & Fizz?
That sounds like the perfect law firm for Eastman, Guiliani, and Wood.


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Re: Brexit

#641

Post by northland10 »

Cue the whining about how companies in the EU should pay millions because the UK decided to take the ball and leave.


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RTH10260
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Re: Brexit

#642

Post by RTH10260 »

northland10 wrote: Mon Aug 08, 2022 11:49 pm Cue the whining about how companies in the EU should pay millions because the UK decided to take the ball and leave.
Currently the whining in the UK is about the "Brexlt tax", eg while still a EU member and before the Brexit referendum the UK committed to certain programs and supporting them financially with the timeframe like a decade. With Brexit, and Boris Johnson retreating out of all programs, even though the EU offered the UK to remain, the Brits are now paying several billions of £ yearly without profiting any longer. :brickwallsmall:


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Re: Brexit

#643

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Much-loved Cardiff restaurant La Cuina is closing due to impact of Brexit
The Catalan kitchen has been part of the Canton food scene for ten years but has struggled with importing ingredients and getting staff

Eve Rowlands
18:05, 8 AUG 2022 UPDATED 11:32, 9 AUG 2022

A much-loved restaurant in the heart of Cardiff is shutting its doors to the public after ten years serving up some delicious and, as per their own description, "utterly authentic" Catalan food and wine to grace Wales' capital.

The cafe and deli opened in Canton in 2012 and is owned and run by Catalunya-born Montserrat Prat who wanted to raise awareness of the importance of sourcing, origins of food and producers and have maintained that ethos since its opening (read our review just weeks after it opened, here).

But now Montserrat and her team, who have created a truly authentic Catalan experience in ambience and taste with La Cuina - are closing the doors of the postage-stamp-sized restaurant after experience importing products and getting staff, has proved difficult.

Read more: Matsudai Ramen has opened its doors in Grangetown and we can't tell you just how good it is

Montserrat told WalesOnline: "We have sustained this idea of ethical sourcing whenever possible during these 10 years of trading, and this had driven our approach throughout. [Then] Brexit was implemented and things have changed substantially. Although we try to source some products locally whenever we can, the nature of our project is Mediterranean and Catalan food, and importing is essential, and we have done it ourselves throughout.

"This has become very difficult since the implementation of borders and the end of free trade with Europe, and has eroded our flexibility to import small quantities as one of the changes is that you cannot mix pallets from different producers, which is catastrophic for small enterprises like ours."




https://www.walesonline.co.uk/whats-on/ ... source=nba


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Re: Brexit

#644

Post by RTH10260 »

When your soveteignity gets challenged by the sovereignity of you destination
Brexit red tape causing holiday luggage delays with suitcases held up by EU customs checks
Unexpected hold-ups in EU destinations have hit baggage delivery services where travellers send luggage ahead to avoid airport queues

Brett Gibbons
10:48, 9 AUG 2022

Holidaymakers from the UK are being advised to shun baggage delivery services where luggage can be sent ahead to many popular sunshine destinations. The facility enables travellers to have bags transported in advance to most locations enabling passengers to avoid baggage check-in queues at airports.

It is especially useful for holidaymakers who may have excess baggage with delivery operators claiming their service is cheaper than extra charges imposed by low-cost airlines like Ryanair.

Many passengers choose budget airlines in a bid to save money, only to discover that they have to pay extra in order to bring anything other than a small item of hand luggage. Fees for a standard item of luggage delivered to many holiday destinations usually start at around £35.

The facility is particularly useful for passengers travelling outside the EU for skiing or golfing breaks who may find that their sports equipment is subjected to a hefty airline excess baggage charge.

There have also been many recent reports of exasperated passengers waiting hours to collect suitcases from their flights and some even leaving the airport without picking up their bags. Incidents such as these have prompted many travellers to consider sending their luggage ahead.

However strict EU customs rules, imposed after Brexit, have caused unexpected delays through red tape with items held up on arrival in Spain and other resorts.



https://www.walesonline.co.uk/whats-on/ ... y-24706642


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Re: Brexit

#645

Post by RTH10260 »

Why the EU no longer wants British seafood
Sewage warning issued for Folkestone beach as swimmers urged to stay away
Two sewer overflows have discharged via an outfall pipe located 700m offshore.

ByLuke Donnelly
18:22, 12 AUG 2022 UPDATED11:48, 13 AUG 2022

https://www.kentlive.news/news/kent-new ... ch-7459101


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Re: Brexit

#646

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Brexit threatening endangered species as red tape hits zoo breeding programmes
Transferring critically endangered species within Europe to broaden the gene pool is more difficult with Britain outside the EU

James Tapper
Sat 13 Aug 2022 21.41 BST

Breeding programmes designed to save critically endangered species are being jeopardised by Brexit, with zoos warning they are being prevented from transferring animals such as rhinos and giraffes by red tape created by the UK’s departure from the EU.

The animal health regulation was passed in 2016 before the EU referendum, but came into force in April 2021. There have been no reports that the UK dissented from the regulation.

Zoos’ small populations mean it is essential that they swap animals for breeding programmes to keep the gene pool as broad as possible.

Before 31 December 2020, an average year saw about 1,400 transfers between the UK and other EU countries. But in 2021 there were just 56, and so far this year there have been 84, according to the British and Irish Association of Zoos and Aquariums (Biaza).

Nicky Needham, Biaza’s senior manager for animal care and conservation, said there were more than 400 European Endangered Species Programmes (EEPs), and UK zoos and aquariums were involved in coordinating about 25%.

“These are safety net populations for threatened species,” she said. “Animal transfers between zoos and aquariums are carefully planned to maintain a healthy genetic population.”

One programme to save the Eastern black rhinoceros, a critically endangered species, has 87 animals, of which about 39 are at UK zoos. “Losing this would jeopardise the viability of the population and stop reintroductions to east Africa,” Needham said.



https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/ ... programmes


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Re: Brexit

#647

Post by RTH10260 »

Karma...
Gove stuck in 30 hour delay caused by Brexit-related travel chaos
The former education secretary's EasyJet flight was delayed by over a day.

Charlie Herbert
2022-08-15 08:02in Politics

Michael Gove has found himself stuck in Brexit-related travel chaos at an airport in Athens.

Twitter user Candida Jones shared a picture of the prominent Brexiteer in the queue at the airport, revealing that the EasyJet flight he was on had been delayed by “almost 30 hours.”

This was because of “a lack of staff due to the pandemic compounded, in the case of the UK, by Brexit.”

In the replies to the tweet, Candida confirmed that the flight was from Athens to Gatwick, and that Gove was indeed flying with EasyJet.




https://www.thelondoneconomic.com/polit ... os-332243/


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Re: Brexit

#648

Post by RTH10260 »

Hint: everyone intending to visit the UK has to register too, also has to pay a fee, except migrants crossing the channel in dingies.

British tourists will have to pay to travel to Europe from new date - affected countries
BRITISH tourists will have to pay to visit the EU next year. But when will the charges come into effect?

By ESTHER MARSHALL
09:28, Tue, Aug 16, 2022 | UPDATED: 10:37, Tue, Aug 16, 2022

The European Travel and Information Scheme (ETIAS) was initially set to be introduced in September 2023.

The EU has now announced that the introduction of the new scheme has been pushed back until November 2023.

Every British traveller will have to apply for an ETIAS on an official website or app and pay the fee to enjoy a holiday in the EU.

The scheme is an additional security and border measure which will be introduced due to security concerns.

Non-EU citizens, including Britons will need an ETIAS if they want to travel to any of the 27 Schengen countries within the EU.




https://www.express.co.uk/travel/articl ... atest-news


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Re: Brexit

#649

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Re: Brexit

#650

Post by RTH10260 »

Liz Truss announces new UK case against EU on eve of debate in Northern Ireland
British foreign secretary triggers formal dispute proceedings with Brussels over British access to EU science programs.

BY CRISTINA GALLARDO
AUGUST 16, 2022 11:30 PM

LONDON — U.K. Foreign Secretary Liz Truss has triggered formal dispute proceedings against the EU on the eve of a highly-politicized trip to Northern Ireland for the latest Conservative leadership hustings.

Truss, the hot favorite to succeed Boris Johnson as U.K. prime minister next month, accused the European Commission of breaching the EU-U.K. Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) by blocking Britain’s access to EU science schemes.

Pledging to do “everything necessary” to protect British science, Truss announced Tuesday evening the long-awaited launch of formal consultations with Brussels over the issue — the first stage of a dispute resolution mechanism set out in the EU-U.K. trade deal.

“The EU is in clear breach of our agreement, repeatedly seeking to politicise vital scientific cooperation by refusing to finalise access to these important programmes,” the U.K. foreign secretary said in a statement. “We cannot allow this to continue.”




https://www.politico.eu/article/uk-liz- ... n-ireland/


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