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Dolly
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#1

Post by Dolly » Mon Sep 16, 2013 9:08 pm

Sep 16, 2013Two major storms lash Mexico, 41 dead amid 'historic' floodsTwo powerful storms pummeled Mexico as they converged from the Pacific and the Gulf on Monday, killing at least 41 people and forcing the evacuation of tens of thousands amid some of the worst flooding in decades.Tropical Depression Ingrid battered Mexico's northern Gulf coast, while the remnants of Tropical Storm Manuel lashed the Pacific coast, inundating the popular beach resort of Acapulco, the U.S. National Hurricane Center (NHC) said.Even as they weakened, the storms continued to unleash massive rains that have killed more than three dozen people in the states of Veracruz, Guerrero, Puebla, Hidalgo, Michoacan and Oaxaca, national emergency services said.In the popular Pacific resort of Acapulco alone, at least 21 people were killed as buildings collapsed and roads were transformed into raging rivers, said Constantino Gonzalez, an official with Guerrero state emergency services."Unfortunately, the majority of the deaths have occurred here in Acapulco due to landslides that completely buried homes," said Gonzalez.Officials said thousands of tourists were stranded due to canceled flights and closed highways.much more at: [/break1]reuters.com/article/2013/09/17/us-storm-ingrid-idUSBRE98D0AH20130917]http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/09/ ... AH20130917
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#2

Post by Addie » Tue Sep 17, 2013 5:31 pm

[link]Reuters,http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/09/ ... AH20130917[/link]





Chaos as floods submerge Mexico's Acapulco, death toll rises





(Reuters) - Mexico's famous beach resort of Acapulco was in chaos on Tuesday as hotels rationed food for thousands of stranded tourists and floodwaters swallowed homes and cars after some of the worst storm damage in decades killed at least 55 people across the country.





Television footage showed Acapulco's international airport terminal waist deep in water and workers wading out to escape floods that have prevented some 40,000 visitors from leaving and blocked one of the main access routes to the city with mud.





A torrential, three-day downpour cut off several roads into the Pacific resort of 750,000 people, which was a magnet for Hollywood stars in its heyday but had the highest murder rate in Mexico last year amid a surge in drug gang violence.





The flooding has disrupted deliveries of supplies, piling fresh misery on a city heavily dependent on tourist spending. The entrance to a main hillside tunnel into Acapulco was completely blocked with mud. ...





Guerrero, which is home to Acapulco, was the hardest hit. At least 34 of the deaths came Guerrero, local emergency services said. Some streets in the state capital Chilpancingo became rivers of mud. Local mayor Mario Moreno said the city had "collapsed."
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#3

Post by Shagnastie » Tue Sep 17, 2013 10:22 pm

At Lake Chapala, we're about 150 mi. inland and due East of where the Pacific storm hit the coast. It's been raining here for 4 days now to a total of about 6 inches. Much more benefit than damage! --> We actually need this precip desperately, as the area been in a serious drought for over three years and the lake level has fallen to about 40% of capacity. This year's rainy season (June thru October) had been pretty weak up to this point and the lake was not recovering. We still need about another 6-8 in. of rain by the middle of Oct. just to reach the seasonal average.The Guadalajara metro area now has about 5 million people and Lake Chapala is their primary source of water, so the municipal governments are keeping their fingers crossed. {SMILIES_PATH}/pray.gif

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#4

Post by Addie » Thu Sep 19, 2013 11:18 am

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#5

Post by mimi » Thu Sep 19, 2013 11:33 am

I hope all the Fowbogzers in Mexico are safe. {SMILIES_PATH}/pray.gif It does sound frightening.

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#6

Post by SueDB » Thu Sep 19, 2013 11:35 am

I hope all the Fowbogzers in Mexico are safe. {SMILIES_PATH}/pray.gif It does sound frightening. :yikes: :( :( :( thing...
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#7

Post by Addie » Thu Sep 19, 2013 11:55 am

[link]CNN,http://www.cnn.com/2013/09/19/world/ame ... e-weather/[/link]





Mexico storms: Worst over for some, coming for others ...





The worst of a deadly storm has passed, but tension and confusion remain as the extent of the damage continued to emerge.





The weather in Acapulco may have improved, but the storm has strengthened to become Hurricane Manuel, which now threatens the state of Sinaloa, to the north. The Category 1 hurricane made landfall Thursday in the northern part of that state. ...





At least 80 people lost their lives due to a trio of storms that slapped Mexico from nearly all sides. Another 58 were reported missing after a mudslide about 50 miles from Acapulco.





In addition to Hurricane Manuel, those living on Mexico's Gulf Coast were recovering from the remnants of Hurricane Ingrid, and in the south, a storm system over the Yucatan Peninsula was likely to become a tropical cyclone. ...





More than 1 million residents across Mexico have been affected in some way by the storms, Interior Minister Miguel Angel Osorio Chong told reporters.
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#8

Post by Addie » Thu Sep 19, 2013 12:14 pm

Even areas well outside the coastal hurricane belt can be having significant issues from the heavy rains, overflowing dams and mudslides. Collapsing roads, bridges, sidewalks and sewers, roofs, walls, whole buildings in some urban areas. Whole villages in the countryside. The water is nice because of the long drought, but don't step the wrong way. [-X
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#9

Post by Addie » Fri Sep 20, 2013 3:15 pm

[link]Fox News Latino,http://latino.foxnews.com/latino/politi ... ea-killer/[/link]





Biden's Mexico Trip To Focus On Economy, May Touch On NSA Spying And DEA Killer





While economic issues between the countries will be the centerpiece of the public meeting Friday between Vice President Joe Biden and Mexican leader Enrique Peña Nieto, analysts say that backroom discussion could shift to security issues, the release in Mexico of a convicted DEA killer and allegations of National Security Agency spying.





Biden and Peña Nieto are expected to meet at the Mexican president’s residence Friday afternoon, where they will give statement s following their meeting. Both the White House and Mexico have touted this meeting as a way to strengthen the economic relationship between the neighboring nations, especially in terms of trade and investment.





“Mexico’s economic situation has strengthened and it wants to be more of a player on the world stage,” Larry Birns, the director of the Council of Hemispheric Affairs told Fox News Latino.





Mexico is the United States’ third largest trading partner, with a total combined trade of more than $500 billion.
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#10

Post by kate520 » Fri Sep 20, 2013 3:17 pm

One of my favorite places, at least before it was gentrified,was Puerto Escondido, below Acapulco on theWest coast. I hope it was not washed away.
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#11

Post by Addie » Sat Aug 23, 2014 2:07 pm

[link]Ancient Origins,http://www.ancient-origins.net/news-his ... QwS63.dpuf[/link]





Archaeologists Discover Two Long Lost Ancient Maya Cities in Jungle in Mexico





In an amazing new discovery in the jungles of Mexico, archaeologists have uncovered two ancient Mayan cities, including ruined pyramid temples, palace remains, a monster mouth gateway, a ball court, altars, and other stone monuments, according to a new release by Discovery News. One of the cities had been found decades ago but all attempts to relocate it had failed. The other city was previously unknown and is a brand new discovery, shedding new light on the ancient Mayan civilization.





Expedition leader Ivan Sprajc, of the Research Center of the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts (ZRC SAZU), explained that the finding was aided by aerial photographs of the tropical forest of central Yucatan in the state of Campeche, Mexico. Some anomalies were noticed among the thick vegetation of the forest and so a team was sent in to investigate further.





Archaeologists were stunned to discover an entire city in an area between the Rio Bec and Chenes regions, extending some 1,800 miles, which are characterised by their Classic architecture dating to around 600 to 1,000 AD.





Although the city had originally been found by the American archaeologist Eric Von Euw in the 1970s, who produced records and drawings of the ancient Mayan ruins, the location was lost and all attempts to relocate the city, which he named Lagunita, had been unsuccessful until now.
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#12

Post by ducktape » Sat Aug 23, 2014 3:43 pm

Although the city had originally been found by the American archaeologist Eric Von Euw in the 1970s, who produced records and drawings of the ancient Mayan ruins, the location was lost and all attempts to relocate the city, which he named Lagunita, had been unsuccessful until now.GPS is truly a wonderful thing. It's so easy to forget that it's just been a few decades that we've had it. A friend of mine founded Magellan, which was the first hand-held GPS for consumers. The first page of his business plan was his executive summary, and his second page said "Why This Isn't a Dumb Idea." Even so, one of my VCs had looked at it and passed, and in the late 1980s they were still laughing about it -- "yep, a device that tells you 'you're here!' How useful is that?" Then came Desert Storm and they wished they had invested in it instead of us.

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#13

Post by kate520 » Sat Aug 23, 2014 5:05 pm

Way cool. I can't locate the story now, but several years, maybe decades, ago some rafters doing a high portage around rapids in a Central Mexico river saw what looked to them like the outline of a city buried in the jungle below them. They took copious amounts of photos and sent them to NatGeo when they got back. NatGeo organized an expedition some years later with the rafters to unearth it.
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#14

Post by Piffle » Sat Aug 23, 2014 10:06 pm

Accounts of the explorations of Stephens and Catherwood in the Yucatan during the mid-19th century make for fascinating reading. But to think that we're still finding (and losing!) great ancient cities in this day and age is mind blowing. Nobody does coverups quite like Mother Nature.Very cool stuff.

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#15

Post by Addie » Sat Aug 30, 2014 4:58 pm

Daily Mail ISIS in Mexico? Feds DENY watchdog group's claim that the terror group is operating in Juarez and plans 'imminent' car-bomb attacks on US targets The Department of Homeland Security quickly denied claims on Friday from a watchdog group that the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) has militants stationed in Juarez, Mexico who plan an 'imminent' attack against the United States. A DHS spokesman was bewildered, telling MailOnline that 'we are aware of absolutely nothing credible to substantiate this claim' made by Judicial Watch, a center-right group.'In Mexico?' the official said on the phone. 'I haven't seen that at all.' ... Judicial Watch reported Friday, based on sources that it would not identify to MailOnline out of concern for their safety, that ISIS terrorists are 'planning to attack the United States with car bombs or other vehicle born [sic] improvised explosive devices.' The group said a 'warning bulletin for an imminent terrorist attack' had been issued to 'agents across a number of Homeland Security, Justice and Defense agencies,'instructing them 'to aggressively work all possible leads and sources' to prevent it. It also claimed the commander of Fort Bliss, a U.S. Army base near the Juarez border crossing, has been briefed on the threat.
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#16

Post by MN-Skeptic » Sat Aug 30, 2014 6:01 pm

Daily Mail I posted about this in the O'Keefe topic. Both Breitbart and Judicial Watch have supposedly talked to "sources." In addition, Breitbart has a document supposedly released by the Texas Department of Public Safety. My cynical self believes that James O'Keefe is behind the whole thing and is the author of the Texas Department of Public Safety document. The fact that Feds deny this just adds to my belief that this is just a scam.
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#17

Post by Addie » Tue Sep 16, 2014 10:40 am

CBS News Mexico to fly out tourists stranded by tropical storm CABO SAN LUCAS, Mexico -- A weakening Tropical Storm Odile pushed up Mexico's Baja California peninsula early Tuesday. While the storm may revive the drought-stricken region, heavy rains could bring dangerous flash floods. Mexico's government said late Monday night that army and commercial planes would be sent to La Paz and Los Cabos airports to ferry out some of the tens of thousands of tourists stranded in temporary shelters in hotels. Los Cabos international airport was damaged by the storm. ... Emergency officials in Baja California reported that 135 people have been treated for minor injuries from flying glass or falling objects. No serious injuries or deaths have been reported so far. About 30,000 tourists were in temporary shelters. Before moving north late Monday, Odile made landfall near Cabo San Lucas as a powerful Category 3 hurricane, before weakening rapidly. It toppled trees and road signs along the main highway, which at one point was flooded by rushing waters. Windows were blown out of high-end hotel rooms and resort facades crumbled to the ground.
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#18

Post by Volkonski » Sat Sep 20, 2014 2:13 pm

http://mexiconewsdaily.com/ That English language Mexican news site has a lot of interesting info. http://mexiconewsdaily.com/wp-contentsr ... pgMichigan ranks third in trade with Mexico? :o Must be all those cars Mexico is producing. And look at how those charts trend upward. There's a lot of money being made from US-Mex trade. And this- A railway bridge over the Rio Grande, linking Texas and Tamaulipas, is the first rail crossing to be built between the two countries in more than a century.The West Rail Bypass Bridge was a long time in the planning — 10 years by one account — but is expected to open to train traffic in November. Construction began on the project in 2010 on the Texas side and early in 2011 on this side of the border.The bridge is located 10 kilometers northeast of Matamoros and is designed in part to alleviate congestion in that city and in Brownsville, Texas, caused by the existing rail line.Snip-----The value of [hlyellow]cross-border railway trade has soared in recent years. According to Bloomberg, it is up 48% in the past five years[/hlyellow] to a total US $69.8 billion, due in large part to the growth in automotive manufacturing in Mexico.- See more at: http://mexiconewsdaily.com/news/new-rai ... yq5Iq.dpuf
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#19

Post by Addie » Sat Sep 20, 2014 2:32 pm

I read the other day that Mexico is the world's 14th largest economy now and tops in Latin America. It still needs to figure out how to rise more boats, though.
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#20

Post by Addie » Sat Oct 11, 2014 5:42 am

TIME







The Apparent Massacre of Dozens of Students Exposes the Corruption at the Heart of Mexico



The young father’s corpse was left on the street of the southern Mexican town of Iguala with his eyes gouged out and flesh ripped off almost to the skull—a technique typical of the cartel murders that have become too common in this country. But unlike many victims of Mexico’s ongoing drug wars, he was no gang member, police officer or journalist. The body belonged to a 19-year old trainee teacher who had been preparing to participate in a march to commemorate a notorious massacre of Mexican students by the military and police in 1968. Instead of making it to that demonstration, though, the young man found himself the victim of a what will be a new atrocity date on Mexico’s bloody calendar.



The murder, which occurred on the night of Sept. 26 or morning of Sept. 27, was part of a brutal attack on student teachers by corrupt police officers and drug cartel assassins that has provoked protests across the nation. During the violence, at least six students and passersby were killed and another 43 students disappeared, with many last seen being bundled into police cars. Soldiers and federal agents have taken over the city of Iguala and have arrested more than 30 officers and alleged gunmen from a cartel called the Guerreros Unidos or Warriors United. They have also discovered a series of mass graves: on Oct. 4, they found 28 charred bodies and on Thursday night they discovered another four pits where they are unearthing more corpses. Agents are conducting DNA tests to see if the bodies belong to the students.



The atrocities have triggered national outrage and presented the biggest security-related challenge yet for Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto. Taking power in 2012, Pena Nieto promised to reduce the tens of thousands of cartel killings and modernize a sluggish economy. He has overseen the arrests of major drug lords like Joaquin “Chapo” Guzman, nabbed in February and Vicente Carrillo Fuentes, alias “The Viceroy,” who was detained on Thursday. But while the total number of homicides declined by 15% in his first year in office, parts of Mexico—such as Guerrero state, where Iguala sits—still suffer some of the highest murder rates in the world. There were 2,087 murders last year in Guerrero, a state of 3.4 million people, giving it a rate of 61 homicides per 100,000 inhabitants. ...



However, the atrocities are also devastating to the opposition Democratic Revolution Party, or PRD. (Pena Nieto is a member of the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, which dominated Mexican politics for most of the 20th century.) Arbaca was a PRD member, and the party’s leader went to the city on Oct. 7 to personally apologize to residents. The governor of Guerrero state is also in the PRD and there have been calls for his resignation. The governor has denied the killing was his fault and called for a referendum on whether he should stay in power. Furthermore, when PRD founder Cuauhtemoc Cardenas joined a protest over the killings in Mexico City on Oct. 8 he was booed and had bottles thrown at him.



The march into Mexico City’s central plaza was joined by tens of thousands of people and was headed by family members of the victims. “I won’t rest until I have my son back,” Mario Cesar Gonzalez, father of 21-year old disappeared student Cesar, told TIME. “This is a problem of corrupt police and politicians working with drug cartels. I am going to fight until we discover the truth of what happened. I don’t care if they kill me. Nothing matters to me except my son.” Most of the disappeared students were the children of poor farmers and workers and went to a university for rural school teachers near Iguala.







Also New York Times Op-Ed:



Mexico’s Deadly Narco-Politics
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#21

Post by Addie » Mon Oct 13, 2014 9:27 am

This story is a week old, but I just read it.



In translation:



Proceso



Guerreros Unidos Hang Mantas in Iguala Demanding Release of Their Narco-Police

CHILPANCINGO, Gro. (Proceso.com.mx) Members of Guerreros Unidos placed banners in the town of Iguala demanding that the state government release 22 municipal police prisoners, held for the slaughter of normalistas from Ayotzinapa.

The members of the criminal group warned that if the government does not release the police, they will reveal the names of the politicians who support their criminal activities.

Official reports state that this morning several banners were placed with the following message:

"Federal and state government and all those who supported us - we demand the release of the 22 policemen arrested. We give you 24 hours to release them. If not released, you'll face the consequences. We'll start giving the names of people in government who supported us - the war has started... sincerely: GU "(sic).

The banners were removed by soldiers from 27th Infantry Battalion.







Some cojones.
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#22

Post by Addie » Tue Oct 14, 2014 9:56 pm

BBC News











Missing Mexican students 'not found in mass grave'





Mexico's attorney general says DNA tests have shown that 28 bodies found in a mass grave are not those of a missing group of students.



Jesus Murillo Karam said further tests were being carried out on four other recently discovered grave sites.



The 43 students went missing three weeks ago amid violent protests in Iguala, south of Mexico City.



Mr Karam said 14 more police officers had been arrested, accused of handing the students over to a drugs gang.



About 50 people have been arrested in connection with the students' disappearance, with the vast majority being local police officers.






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#23

Post by Addie » Tue Oct 21, 2014 10:27 am

Daily Beast





She Tweeted Against the Mexican Cartels. They Tweeted Her Murder.



No newspaper dares to publish the truth about the drug lords in Tamaulipas, Mexico, and those who break the silence on Twitter and Facebook are marked for death.



MEXICO CITY—She was a crusading Twitter journalist in a bastion of organized crime who chose a photograph of Catwoman as her online avatar and christened herself Felina. Like a comic-book avenger, her alter ego defied the forces of evil in her real-life Gotham of Reynosa, a border city in the Mexican state of Tamaulipas located a short drive from McAllen, Texas. Tamaulipas is notorious as a state caught in the iron grip of organized crime. Extortion, kidnappings, shootouts, arson, bodies excavated from arid pits, all of this happens in Tamaulipas, practically on a daily basis, but hardly any of it gets reported because of a media blackout the cartels decreed four years ago that is as strictly enforced as martial law after a coup.



Two rival drug cartels in Tamaulipas, the Gulf Cartel and the Zetas, have final say over what gets printed or broadcast in the local media. By necessity the people of the state increasingly have turned to social media to share information about organized crime and its infiltration of the government. They are referred to as citizen journalists and have received international attention for their innovative use of sites like Facebook and Twitter to defy the imposition of the blackout.



Felina was an administrator for Valor por Tamaulipas (which means Courage for Tamaulipas), the most popular citizen news hub in the state, with more than 100,000 followers on Twitter and over half a million on Facebook. A sampling of the site’s content varies from the sensational to the specific. There are photos of young teenagers holding military-grade firepower with captions or comments that identify them as members of organized crime. There are posters of missing persons and news alerts about violence that are timely and specific: “At 10am there were isolated gunshots heard coming from Unidad Obrera”; “Since 12:25a.m. Explosions and machine gun fire at Cañada/Fuentes, and pickup trucks passed at high speed on 20th Street”; “In Balcones sector 2 white Ford pickup with 3 armed Men on Everest Street and Seventh.” Soldiers at the Mexican army base in Reynosa also post news alerts to the site about violent confrontations between the army and the narcos. ...



# reynosafollow FRIENDS AND FAMILY, MY REAL NAME IS MARÍA DEL ROSARIO FUENTES RUBIO. I AM A PHYSICIAN. TODAY MY LIFE HAS COME TO AN END.



The next message, sent moments later, is supposedly her warning friends and family not to make the same mistake she did, using social media to report on organized crime, because “there is no point.” The message after that is a warning to her followers and to three prominent citizen journalists that the cartels “are closer to us than you think.” The last message sent from Felina’s account is not written but rather consists of two photos: in the first, a middle-aged woman keeps her hands folded in front of her and looks directly at the camera; in the second the same woman is lying on a dirty floor with a coup de grace bullet wound in the face. The founder of Valor por Tamaulipas confirmed that the photos are of Felina. Twitter has since shut down her account.



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#24

Post by Addie » Thu Oct 23, 2014 8:11 am

It was known all along in this story that the mayor and his wife were involved, even before they disappeared, but this makes it official; fwiw, in a country with close to no criminal justice system.



Reuters







Mexico says mayor, wife were behind student-teacher disappearances ...



So far, federal authorities have arrested 52 people in connection with the incident, including dozens of police who have links to a gang called Guerreros Unidos, or "United Warriors." The gang's leader, Sidronio Casarrubias, was caught last week. ...



In Mexico City, Attorney General Jesus Murillo said Casarrubias had told prosecutors that Iguala Mayor Jose Luis Abarca and his wife, Maria de los Angeles Pineda, had ordered two local police forces to stop the students from disrupting a political event that day.



"We have issued warrants for the arrest of Iguala Mayor Jose Luis Abarca, his wife Mrs Pineda Villa and police chief Felipe Flores Velazquez, as probable masterminds of the events that occurred in Iguala on Sept. 26," Murillo said at a press conference.



During the September incident, police shot and killed one student and detained the others before turning them over to Guerreros Unidos gang members, Murillo added. He said the gang then mistook the students for members of rival criminal group "Los Rojos," or "The Reds."



He also said that according to Casarrubias' information, Pineda, who the government says comes from a family of high-ranking drug traffickers, was Guerreros Unidos' top boss within the Iguala government.






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#25

Post by Addie » Fri Oct 24, 2014 8:30 am

New York Times









In Mexico, an Embattled Governor Resigns



MEXICO CITY — The governor of the southern Mexico state where 43 college students have gone missing in a case that the authorities say has exposed the deep ties among local politicians, the police and organized crime stepped down on Thursday under pressure from his own party.



The governor, Ángel Aguirre of Guerrero State, agreed to leave his post after leaders of his party, the Democratic Party of the Revolution, publicly said they would otherwise try to push him out in order to quell growing civil unrest in the state. ...



Governors, politically powerful in Mexico’s federal system and legally protected in most cases from prosecution, rarely step down or face investigation while in office. But in southern Mexico, there is some precedent, including another governor of Guerrero, Rubén Figueroa Alcocer, who was forced out in 1996 after government-linked gunmen killed 17 peasants at a roadblock. Mr. Aguirre served the remaining three years of his term as his appointed successor. ...



“Aguirre’s resignation does not accomplish much, especially when we take into account we have a very porous political class, when it comes to organized crime, and because we don’t have solid institutions,” said Fernando Dworak, a political analyst and columnist.






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