Archaeology, palaeontology and other ancient things

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RTH10260
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#51

Post by RTH10260 »

Lockdown Gardening in Britain Leads to Archaeological Discoveries
The finds this year, including a cache of gold coins from the reign of Henry VIII, come as Britain considers expanding the law to protect a broader range of artifacts from its centuries-old history.

By Jenny Gross
Dec. 9, 2020

LONDON — Gardeners in Hampshire, a county in southeast England, were weeding their yard in April when they found 63 gold coins and one silver coin from King Henry VIII’s reign in the 16th century, with four of the coins inscribed with the initials of the king’s wives Catherine of Aragon, Anne Boleyn and Jane Seymour.

The archaeological find was one of more than 47,000 in England and Wales that were reported this year, amid an increase in backyard gardening during coronavirus lockdowns, the British Museum said on Wednesday.

In another discovery, in Milton Keynes, a town northwest of London, gardeners found 50 solid gold South African Krugerrand coins that were minted in the 1970s during apartheid.

The news of the archaeological finds came as the British government said last week that it planned to broaden its definition of what constitutes a treasure so that more rare artifacts — not just ones made of gold or silver, or that were more than 300 years old — could be preserved for display in museums rather than sold to private collectors.


https://www.nytimes.com/2020/12/09/worl ... ening.html


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#52

Post by RTH10260 »

UK
Fifth-century mosaic sheds new light on Dark Ages
Mark Bridge
Thursday December 10 2020, 9.00am GMT, The Times

A mosaic found at Chedworth has been dated to around AD480 — long after the end of Roman rule

A mosaic at Chedworth Roman villa that was believed to date from the fourth century has been radiocarbon-dated to 100 years later, around AD480, revealing that a sophisticated Roman lifestyle persisted in parts of Britain long after the end of imperial rule.

Experts said that they were still “reeling” from the redating of the elaborate artwork at the Gloucestershire site as the only known 5th century mosaic in Britain. They said that its creation in a period in which villas were thought to have been largely abandoned was of “enormous significance” for casting light on the Dark Ages.

Martin Papworth, a National Trust archaeologist, said that the dating would encourage re-evaluation of other sites where “Roman” features may have been wrongly dated to no later...





Paywall https://www.thetimes.co.uk/edition/news ... -n789dq590


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#53

Post by MsDaisy »

A Wolf Pup Mummy From the Ancient Arctic
Melting permafrost yields secrets of how a 6-week-old wolf puppy lived and died.
More than 50,000 years ago, a den in sandy soil collapsed on a wolf pup and killed her, sealing her away from air and moisture so the pup’s body mummified in the cold.

She stayed buried in permafrost until four years ago, when the work of global warming and the explorations of a gold miner uncovered her in Canada’s Yukon Territory near Dawson City.

He wanted a precious metal; what he found was paleontological gold.

That mummy is now on display at the Yukon Beringia Interpretive Center in Whitehorse — body and fur intact, lips shrunken back so her teeth are visible in what looks a bit like a snarl. The puppy is so well preserved that it is easy to tell from visual observation that she is female.

She also has a name, Zhur (meaning wolf) in the language of the Trʼondëk Hwëchʼin people, in whose ancestral land the wolf was buried.
https://www.nytimes.com/2020/12/21/scie ... e=Homepage


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#54

Post by Eaststander2 »

A friend of mine here in the UK recently asked me if I could identify about a dozen coins. I’m not a numismatist, but was able to identify almost all of them. They ranged in age from around two to four hundred years old, and were mostly silver. To my eye, they appeared too worn to be seriously valuable.

When I enquired as to how they were found, the story was that one of my friend’s relatives, now deceased, was working as a gardener in the grounds of an abbey in Buckinghamshire, and came across a hoard of “hundreds” of coins while digging. He was so underwhelmed by his discovery, he took a few of the coins home and reburied the rest where they lay, never bothering to go back to the site.

This seems so extraordinary, I wonder if the story has become embellished over the years. I failed to identify where this abbey was located, and if the story is true, the hoard is laying there today, perhaps waiting to be discovered by an archaeologist of the future.


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#55

Post by RoadScholar »

Eaststander2 wrote: Tue Dec 22, 2020 12:40 pm A friend of mine here in the UK recently asked me if I could identify about a dozen coins. I’m not a numismatist, but was able to identify almost all of them. They ranged in age from around two to four hundred years old, and were mostly silver. To my eye, they appeared too worn to be seriously valuable.

When I enquired as to how they were found, the story was that one of my friend’s relatives, now deceased, was working as a gardener in the grounds of an abbey in Buckinghamshire, and came across a hoard of “hundreds” of coins while digging. He was so underwhelmed by his discovery, he took a few of the coins home and reburied the rest where they lay, never bothering to go back to the site.

This seems so extraordinary, I wonder if the story has become embellished over the years. I failed to identify where this abbey was located, and if the story is true, the hoard is laying there today, perhaps waiting to be discovered by an archaeologist of the future.
Usually, but rarity can change that equation. Some varieties of New Jersey colonial coins, for instance (with the horse-head obverses!) are so rare that a barely-identifiable worn-smooth example can be worth in the mid-5 figures.


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#56

Post by pipistrelle »

Wasn't the story posted here that bored Britons are digging up their gardens, etc., and finding all kinds of cool things?


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#57

Post by Volkonski »

Reuters
@Reuters
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17m
Archaeologists uncover ancient street food shop in Pompeii http://reut.rs/2M1BmAI

Image


Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace
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#58

Post by p0rtia »

Wow! Awesome! Thanks V!

You get the award for best poster of 2020 for ongoing outstanding posts.

:bighug: :bighug:


No matter where you go, there you are! :towel:
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#59

Post by Volkonski »

p0rtia wrote: Sat Dec 26, 2020 2:46 pm Wow! Awesome! Thanks V!

You get the award for best poster of 2020 for ongoing outstanding posts.

:bighug: :bighug:
:thankyou:


Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace
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#60

Post by Volkonski »



The New York Times
@nytimes
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Ancient leftovers from Pompeii were found this month after archaeologists excavated a thermopolium, or snack bar. A soupy concoction of snails, sheep and fish appears to have been all the rage in 79 AD. https://nyti.ms/3hkt4PV


Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace
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#61

Post by RTH10260 »

UK
Researchers win £1m grant to unlock secrets of Viking-era treasure trove
Galloway Hoard comprising more than 100 objects lay undiscovered for 1,000 years before discovery in 2014

Caroline Davies
Mon 21 Dec 2020 00.01 GMT

Researchers in Scotland hope to unlock the secrets of a stunning Viking-age hoard after a receiving a £1m grant to examine the provenance of the 10th century haul that lay undisturbed for a thousand years before being unearthed by a metal detectorist.

The incredible discovery of the Galloway Hoard, comprising more than 100 objects including silver jewellery and ingots, was made in September 2014 in a field in Dumfries and Galloway. It has since been acquired by National Museums Scotland (NMS).

NMS will carry out a three-year project, “Unwrapping the Galloway Hoard”, in partnership with the University of Glasgow, to examine in detail the objects, due to go on display in an exhibition next year.



https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/202 ... sure-trove


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#62

Post by RTH10260 »

Mamlambo

I'm an amateur fossil hunter living on the South Island of New Zealand. I enjoy hunting the coastal cliffs for Miocene and Cretaceous era fossils and venturing further afield for the petrified wood and fossils that can be found there. I'm constantly learning about the fossils that can be found here in New Zealand.


https://www.youtube.com/c/Mamlambo/about


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#63

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NYT newsletter wrote:Relics from the Horti Lamiana, the favorite hideaway of ancient Rome’s most infamous tyrant, have been recovered by archaeologists and will be put on display in the new Nymphaeum Museum of Piazza Vittorio in Rome.

The dig, carried out beneath the rubble of a condemned 19th-century apartment complex, yielded such treasures as gems, coins, cameo glass, a theater mask, above, and bones of peacocks, deer, lions, bears and ostriches.
Caligula’s Garden of Delights, Unearthed and Restored
Relics from the favorite hideaway of ancient Rome’s most infamous tyrant have been recovered and put on display by archaeologists.

By Franz Lidz
Jan. 12, 2021

The fourth of the 12 Caesars, Caligula — officially, Gaius Julius Caesar Germanicus — was a capricious, combustible first-century populist remembered, perhaps unfairly, as the empire’s most tyrannical ruler. As reported by Suetonius, the Michael Wolff of ancient Rome, he never forgot a slight, slept only a few hours a night and married several times, lastly to a woman named Milonia.

During the four years that Caligula occupied the Roman throne, his favorite hideaway was an imperial pleasure garden called Horti Lamiani, the Mar-a-Lago of its day. The vast residential compound spread out on the Esquiline Hill, one of the seven hills on which the city was originally built, in the area around the current Piazza Vittorio Emanuele II.

There, just on the edge of the city, villas, shrines and banquet halls were set in carefully constructed “natural” landscapes. An early version of a wildlife park, the Horti Lamiani featured orchards, fountains, terraces, a bath house adorned with precious colored marble from all over the Mediterranean, and exotic animals, some of which were used, as in the Colosseum, for private circus games.

When Caligula was assassinated in his palace on the Palatine Hill in 41 A.D., his body was carried to the Horti Lamiani, where he was cremated and hastily buried before being moved to the Mausoleum of Augustus on the Campus Martius, north of the Capitoline Hill. According to Suetonius, the elite garden was haunted by Caligula’s ghost.



https://www.nytimes.com/2021/01/12/scie ... miani.html


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#64

Post by MsDaisy »

RTH10260 wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 10:20 am
NYT newsletter wrote:Relics from the Horti Lamiana, the favorite hideaway of ancient Rome’s most infamous tyrant, have been recovered by archaeologists and will be put on display in the new Nymphaeum Museum of Piazza Vittorio in Rome.

The dig, carried out beneath the rubble of a condemned 19th-century apartment complex, yielded such treasures as gems, coins, cameo glass, a theater mask, above, and bones of peacocks, deer, lions, bears and ostriches.
Caligula’s Garden of Delights, Unearthed and Restored
Relics from the favorite hideaway of ancient Rome’s most infamous tyrant have been recovered and put on display by archaeologists.

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/01/12/scie ... miani.html
:thumbs: That's pretty cool!


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#65

Post by Uninformed »

As reported by Suetonius, the Michael Wolff of ancient Rome, he never forgot a slight, slept only a few hours a night and married several times, lastly to a woman named Milonia.
:think:


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#66

Post by Foggy »

@realCaligula, had a ton of followers ...


I hope y'all are still wearing your seat belts!
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#67

Post by Notorial Dissent »

Foggy wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 1:04 pm @realCaligula, had a ton of followers ...
And look how he ended up after four years!!!!!!


The fact that you sincerely and wholeheartedly believe that the “Law of Gravity” is unconstitutional and a violation of your sovereign rights, does not absolve you of adherence to it.
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#68

Post by RTH10260 »

Dire Wolves Were Not Really Wolves, New Genetic Clues Reveal
The extinct giant canids were a remarkable example of convergent evolution

By Riley Black on January 13, 2021

Somewhere in Southwestern North America during the late Pleistocene, a pack of dire wolves (Canis dirus) are feeding on their bison kill, while a pair of grey wolves (Canis lupus) approach in the hopes of scavenging. One of the dire wolves rushes in to confront the grey wolves, and their confrontation allows a comparison of the bigger, larger-headed and reddish-brown dire wolf with its smaller, grey relative. Credit: Mauricio Antón
Dire wolves are iconic beasts. Thousands of these extinct Pleistocene carnivores have been recovered from the La Brea Tar Pits in Los Angeles. And the massive canids have even received some time in the spotlight thanks to the television series Game of Thrones. But a new study of dire wolf genetics has startled paleontologists: it found that these animals were not wolves at all, but rather the last of a dog lineage that evolved in North America.

Ever since they were first described in the 1850s, dire wolves have captured modern humans’ imagination. Their remains have been found throughout much of the Americas, from Idaho to Bolivia. The La Brea asphalt seeps famously document how prey animals mired in tar lured many of these ice age predators to a sticky death. The dire wolves’ tar-preserved remains reveal an imposing hunter up to six feet long, with skull and jaw adaptations to take down enormous, struggling megafauna. Though these canids had clearly evolved to handle the mastodons, horses, bison and other large herbivores then roaming the Americas, skeletal resemblances between dire wolves and the smaller gray wolves of today suggested a close kinship. It had long been assumed that dire wolves made themselves at home in North America before gray wolves followed them across the Bering Land Bridge from Eurasia. Now some well-preserved DNA seems to be fundamentally changing the story.

The new study, published on Wednesday in Nature, began as an effort to understand dire wolves’ biological basics. “For me, it started with a decision to road-trip around the U.S. collecting dire wolf samples and see what we could get, since no one had managed to get DNA out of dire wolf samples at that point,” says Durham University archaeologist and study co-author Angela Perri. At the same time, geneticist and co-author Kieren Mitchell of the University of Adelaide in Australia was also trying to extract and study ancient DNA from dire wolf remains—as were other labs that eventually collaborated on the project.

One of the researchers’ questions was how dire wolves were related to other wolves. For decades, paleontologists have remarked on how similar the bones of dire wolves and gray wolves are. Sometimes it is difficult to tell them apart. “My hunch was that dire wolves were possibly a specialized lineage or subspecies of gray wolf,” Mitchell says.

But the new evidence told a different story. Preliminary genetic analyses indicated that dire and gray wolves were not close relatives. “I think I can speak for the whole group when I say the results were definitely a surprise,” Perri says.

After sequencing five genomes from dire wolf fossils between 50,000 and 13,000 years old, the researchers found that the animals belonged to a much older lineage of dogs. Dire wolves, it now appeared, had evolved in the Americas and had no close kinship with the gray wolves from Eurasia; the last time gray wolves and dire wolves shared a common ancestor was about 5.7 million years ago. The strong resemblance between the two, the researchers say, is a case of convergent evolution, whereby different species develop similar adaptations—or even appearances—thanks to a similar way of life. Sometimes such convergence is only rough, such as both birds and bats evolving wings despite their differing anatomy. In the case of dire and gray wolves, lives of chasing large herbivores to catch some meat on the hoof resulted in two different canid lineages independently producing wolflike forms.



https://www.scientificamerican.com/arti ... es-reveal/


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#69

Post by RTH10260 »

Pig Painting May Be World’s Oldest Cave Art Yet, Archaeologists Say
The depiction of the animal on an Indonesian island is at least 45,500 years old, the researchers say.

By Becky Ferreira
Jan. 13, 2021

In a hidden valley on an Indonesian island, there is a cave decorated with what may be the oldest figurative art ever glimpsed by modern eyes.

The vivid depiction of a wild pig, outlined and filled in with mulberry-hued pigment, dates back at least 45,500 years, according to a study published on Wednesday in Science Advances. It was discovered deep inside a cave called Leang Tedongnge in December 2017, during an archaeological survey led by Basran Burhan, a graduate student at Griffith University and co-author of the new research. The animal in the painting resembles the warty pig, a species still living today on the island of Sulawesi where the cave is.

Sulawesi was already considered by some experts to be the site of the earliest known representational cave art in the world. A captivating scene elsewhere on the island, which displays human-animal hybrids, was found to be at least 43,900 years old, reported by the same team in a 2019 study.

These examples of cave art, along with another pig figure spotted at a cave further south by Adhi Agus Oktavhiana, a graduate student at Griffith University and co-author of the study, hint at the rich cultures living on the Indonesian islands. The discoveries also open a debate over whether the artists could have been Homo sapiens, or members of another extinct human species.

The Leang Tedongnge site is only about 40 miles from Makassar, a bustling city of some 1.5 million people. But the cave has remained virtually untouched because it is so challenging to reach.

“Getting to it requires a difficult trek along a rough forest path that winds through mountainous terrain and ends in a narrow cave passage, which is the only entrance to the valley,” said Adam Brumm, also an archaeologist at Griffith University and a co-author of the study. “The valley can only be accessed during the dry season; during the wet season the valley floor is completely flooded and the residents have to travel around on dugout canoes.”



https://www.nytimes.com/2021/01/13/scie ... nesia.html


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#70

Post by Chilidog »

The headline says all you really need to know

https://www.livescience.com/amp/first-d ... found.html

1st preserved dinosaur butthole is 'perfect' and 'unique,' paleontologist says


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