Network - general thread

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RTH10260
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Network - general thread

#1

Post by RTH10260 » Wed Apr 24, 2019 8:06 pm

the second "Y2K" looms for the internet routing
Some internet outages predicted for the coming month as '768k Day' approaches
768k Day expected within the month, reminiscent of 512k Day when AT&T, BT, Comcast, Sprint, and Verizon all went down.

By Catalin Cimpanu for Between the Lines | April 18, 2019 -- 15:35 GMT (16:35 BST) | Topic: Networking

WHAT IS 768K DAY?
The term 768k Day comes from the original mother of all internet outages known as 512k Day.

512k Day happened on August 12, 2014, when hundreds of ISPs from all over the world went down, causing billions of dollars in damages due to lost trade and fees, from a lack of internet connectivity or packet loss.

The original 512k Day took place because routers ran out of memory for storing the global BGP routing table, a file that holds the IPv4 addresses of all known internet-connected networks.

At the time, a large chunk of the internet was being routed through devices that were allocating TCAM (ternary content-addressable memory) large enough to store no more than 512,000 internet routes.

But when on August 12, 2014, Verizon added 15,000 new BGP routes, this caused the global BGP routing table to suddenly go over the 512,000 lines without warning. On older routers, this manifested by the global routing table file overflowing from its allocated memory, crashing the devices every time they attempted to read or work with the file. Companies like Microsoft, eBay, LastPass, BT, LiquidWeb, Comcast, AT&T, Sprint, and Verizon, were all impacted.

Many legacy routers received emergency firmware patches that allowed network admins to set a higher threshold for the size of the memory allocated to handle the global BGP routing table.

Most network administrators followed documentation provided at the time and set the new upper limit at 768,000 -- aka 768k.


https://www.zdnet.com/article/some-inte ... pproaches/

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Re: Network - general thread

#2

Post by RTH10260 » Thu May 09, 2019 9:37 am

RIAA Obtains Subpoena to Expose ‘Infringing’ Cloudflare Users
BY ERNESTO ON MAY 6, 2019

The RIAA has obtained a subpoena from a Columbia federal court ordering Cloudflare to hand over the IP and email addresses and all other identifying information related to several allegedly infringing users. The RIAA notes it will use the information it receives to protect the rights of its member companies.

Despite the increased availability of legal options, millions of people still stream, rip, or download MP3s from unofficial sources.

These sites are a thorn in the side of the RIAA, one of the music industry’s leading anti-piracy outfits.

The RIAA has a long history of going after, what it sees as, pirate sites. The problem, however, is that many owners of such sites operate anonymously. The group, therefore, often has to turn to third-party intermediaries to find out more.

While some services may be willing to voluntarily share information with the music industry group, many don’t. Cloudflare falls into the latter category. While the CDN service does voluntarily reveal the true hosting locations of some of its users, it doesn’t share any personal info. At least, not without a subpoena.

Luckily for rightsholders, getting a subpoena isn’t very hard in the US. Under the DMCA, copyright holders only have to ask a court clerk for a signature to be able to demand the personal information of alleged copyright infringers. That’s exactly what the RIAA did last week.


https://torrentfreak.com/riaa-obtains-s ... rs-180506/

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Re: Network - general thread

#3

Post by RTH10260 » Thu Jul 18, 2019 9:11 am

Fond memories of early "networking" - nearly ripe for the Today In History thread :lol:

I just opened a eight years old archive backup, and within I stumbled over an even older backup, one from my first notebook, an IBM Thinkpad of 1996, :o two decades ago.

And :shock: I was reminded of those hi-tec superb speeds that were available back then over dialup lines: 56Kbd over ISDN protocol :lol:

Just five years earlier, at least in Switzerland, the best to have had was 9600bd over leased and specially qualified copper lines.

Of course with unlicensed and therefore illegal (in Switzerland) modems I made my steps from 1200bd, 4800bd, 9600bd to 14.5Kbd over dial-up phone lines.

I did start up with an acoustic coupler over phone line and 300bd back in the early days of communications, and was proud to have once downloaded a whole Megabyte (1MB) in eight (8) hours without a hickup.

Happy internetting !

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