Fogbow Arts and Crafts Club

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RVInit
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Re: Fogbow Arts and Crafts Club

#826

Post by RVInit » Sun Jul 07, 2019 1:41 pm

Slim Cognito wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 3:49 pm
Those are beautiful. I want to learn to knit. Now that I have my medical MJ (for arthritis), maybe it's time.
Thanks. Have you tried Portuguese knitting? It's a different style of holding the needles and takes the pressure off the fingers. You can get a Portuguese knitting pin or you can even run the yarn around your neck if you don't have a pin. I use magnetic pins so they don't tear up my clothing. Once I learned this technique I pretty much use it for everything. The biggest challenge is getting the hang of when to ease up if you are doing some kind of lace, but the rhythm comes pretty quickly. It's easy on the hands and makes purl stitches even easier than doing a normal knit stitch using any other style of knitting.

Here are a couple of videos. Andrea Wong uses the pin, but you can try this out by doing exactly the same as she is doing, just put the yarn around your neck - your neck becomes "the pin". Her video shows how to set up, where to put the yarn, how to wind the yarn through your fingers so you have tension, but also so it will slip through when you need more yarn. Don't let that scare you, you are just winding the yarn around fingers and figuring out how many and what direction to wind them around. Depending on humidity and how slippery is the yarn I might wind the yarn slightly differently each time I knit.

Here is Andrea Wong demonstrating this on an Interweave video. She has two classes on Craftsy/Blueprint, and those classes are really good.



Here is another video demonstration by someone else.


Here is a third video where you can practice this style of knitting on a simple dishcloth.

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Re: Fogbow Arts and Crafts Club

#827

Post by Whatever4 » Sun Jul 07, 2019 1:52 pm

That’s bizarre. :shock:
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Slim Cognito
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Re: Fogbow Arts and Crafts Club

#828

Post by Slim Cognito » Sun Jul 07, 2019 4:20 pm

RVInit wrote:
Sun Jul 07, 2019 1:41 pm
Slim Cognito wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 3:49 pm
Those are beautiful. I want to learn to knit. Now that I have my medical MJ (for arthritis), maybe it's time.
Thanks. Have you tried Portuguese knitting? It's a different style of holding the needles and takes the pressure off the fingers. You can get a Portuguese knitting pin or you can even run the yarn around your neck if you don't have a pin. I use magnetic pins so they don't tear up my clothing. Once I learned this technique I pretty much use it for everything. The biggest challenge is getting the hang of when to ease up if you are doing some kind of lace, but the rhythm comes pretty quickly. It's easy on the hands and makes purl stitches even easier than doing a normal knit stitch using any other style of knitting.

Here are a couple of videos. Andrea Wong uses the pin, but you can try this out by doing exactly the same as she is doing, just put the yarn around your neck - your neck becomes "the pin". Her video shows how to set up, where to put the yarn, how to wind the yarn through your fingers so you have tension, but also so it will slip through when you need more yarn. Don't let that scare you, you are just winding the yarn around fingers and figuring out how many and what direction to wind them around. Depending on humidity and how slippery is the yarn I might wind the yarn slightly differently each time I knit.

Here is Andrea Wong demonstrating this on an Interweave video. She has two classes on Craftsy/Blueprint, and those classes are really good.



Here is another video demonstration by someone else.


Here is a third video where you can practice this style of knitting on a simple dishcloth.


I will now! Thx!
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Re: Fogbow Arts and Crafts Club

#829

Post by WriteItDown » Mon Jul 15, 2019 10:05 pm

Hi all

I don't know how to post an original post so must do it under "answer ". Sorry.
It is appalling to see how undervalued handmade goods are in this society. My quilting group decided to go on a short retreat to a nearby hot springs. None of us has much money so we had a booth at the 4th of July community craft fair. Hundreds of people attended and all we made was about $200. We had bed quilts, lap quilts, baby quilts and table runners along with my hand felted animals and sock gnomes. We sold 2 table runners, 5 Christmas spiders 2 gnomes, and 2 trivets. We thought that all were fairly priced. So, are we (crafters) the only ones that get paid about 2 cents an hour? Do not people realize how much time and effort it takes to make things?
on: :smokeears:
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Re: Fogbow Arts and Crafts Club

#830

Post by Patagoniagirl » Mon Jul 15, 2019 10:31 pm

Hey, WID, cheap goods from China. I make beautiful rag rugs, each one taking on average 4-5 days. I took them to a festival this weekend and got raves for them but few buyers. On ETSY they range from $50 on up depending on size. I was desperate so priced mine from $20 - $35.

I mostly have made them for my house and for family. I'll probably stick with that.

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Re: Fogbow Arts and Crafts Club

#831

Post by Slim Cognito » Mon Jul 15, 2019 10:50 pm

Hi WID! What PG said. We've been ruined by Wal-Mart. I finally gave up my hat biz. Why buy a homemade, original pirate hat for $75 when you can get a mass produced one on eBay for $10. The people who appreciated them were talented enough to make their own.
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Re: Fogbow Arts and Crafts Club

#832

Post by Maybenaut » Mon Jul 15, 2019 11:44 pm

I make stuff... mostly bags, but other stuff too. I went to a Pride Festival recently (I was part of the entertainment :bag: ). Anyway, there were lots of vendors there selling lots of stuff. I bought a bag. I know, I could have made it myself way cheaper (but it is made from really cute cowgirl fabric I haven’t seen anywhere, with plastic laminated cotton inside, and I don’t have a bag like that). And I thought, what the heck... you can never have too many bags and these folks work hard on their art.

I love to make stuff, but I haven’t really tried to sell any of it (although I have been known to give it away). My most recent project is a simple cross-body bag made from quilted batik. I put dividers inside to hold my epi-pens and battery packs in place.

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Re: Fogbow Arts and Crafts Club

#833

Post by MN-Skeptic » Tue Jul 16, 2019 4:52 am

What would you have to charge for a handmade item if you were to get $15/hour plus the cost of materials? I can’t imagine trying to earn a living by knitting or crocheting.
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Re: Fogbow Arts and Crafts Club

#834

Post by Sugar Magnolia » Tue Jul 16, 2019 6:49 am

WriteItDown wrote:
Mon Jul 15, 2019 10:05 pm
Hi all

I don't know how to post an original post so must do it under "answer ". Sorry.
It is appalling to see how undervalued handmade goods are in this society. My quilting group decided to go on a short retreat to a nearby hot springs. None of us has much money so we had a booth at the 4th of July community craft fair. Hundreds of people attended and all we made was about $200. We had bed quilts, lap quilts, baby quilts and table runners along with my hand felted animals and sock gnomes. We sold 2 table runners, 5 Christmas spiders 2 gnomes, and 2 trivets. We thought that all were fairly priced. So, are we (crafters) the only ones that get paid about 2 cents an hour? Do not people realize how much time and effort it takes to make things?
on: :smokeears:
A lot of it is where you're trying to sell. Small craft fairs, farmer's markets, and other events (like parades) which set up craft booths as an afterthought to the main event rarely do well any more. The competition is pretty stiff in the makers markets to begin with, millennials are shedding possessions, not acquiring them, and the re-movement (re-purpose, re-make, re-cycle) has many more people hobby crafting than have in the past. A recent article in the American Craft Council (I think that's where I saw it) magazine said spending on hobby crafting is increasing, and traditional folk crafts such as quilting and knitting are growing. The Modern Quilt movement has brought many women back to the traditional craft, and popularity of Ravelry and similar sites have drawn in new knitters and crocheters. With so many making it themselves, it's harder and harder to find buyers.

Years ago people could sell hand crafted items for pin money but that's not so true any more without having a relatively unique product or high name recognition. Direct selling to the public, either through fairs and festivals or sites like Etsy are almost a full-time job just for the marketing and traveling and set up and all the other stuff that's required to sell like that, before you ever get to the actual crafting part of it. I sold for years at festivals, but limited myself to the ones I knew my target audience was attending. Multiple-day music festivals only, preferably tourist oriented, with big name musicians. That way, I knew the people seeing my work had interests that would make my stuff appealing to them, they had money to travel for the music festivals and were willing to spend it on an experience, and the festival was organized and successful enough to pay for well known musicians. I always made my expenses and occasionally did really well at the festivals, but my real income came from commissions after the fact. I knew going in I would have to either offer shipping or create pieces with an eye towards what could fit in a suitcase or trunk of a car. I also had to accept that I might not sell something until a year later (7 years in the case of a piece I sold this past Christmas) but when I did I could charge more because they never want THAT piece they saw, they want something custom that is similar to it.

Putting your work in adjudicated shows and galleries, or anything with a jury fee, pays better if that's an option for you. I can't remember ever selling an actual bed quilt at a show, but people don't bat an eye at spending upwards of $1000 for one at a gallery, or calling me months later to commission one, so I usually had at least one on display even though I didn't expect it to sell. Many of the "professional" crafters gripe about the craft hobbyists being competition for sales but I don't worry too much about them. People will pay for quality, but they will also pay for what they like. My house is full of handcrafted pieces and art from beginners. The professionals do have a point about weekend hobbyists who undercut on price though. Price your work at what it is worth, and don't undervalue it, or your time, by pricing it cheaply just to sell it. Not only does that train the buyers to undervalue crafts but it makes YOU undervalue your own work when it doesn't sell. That is a vicious cycle when you spend more time or money or effort making a better product to sell at a price point that was already too low.

Do any of the lawyers on here charge less than their time is worth just to get clients? Doctors? Plumbers? Mine don't, so why should I?

I have actually seen and touched one of Maybenaught's bags and know what they are worth. If you were selling them for less than $75, you were cheating yourself. I know the woman who bought the one at the Nasty Women show thought she was getting a killer deal at $100. Oddly enough, if you value your own time and work and price accordingly, so will other people. If I saw that bag priced at $25 I would wonder what was wrong with it or if it was badly made.

The moral of the story is that you have to put the time (lots of time) in to building your reputation and client base if you ever want to make any money at selling handcrafts, and do not undervalue your own skills and product.

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Re: Fogbow Arts and Crafts Club

#835

Post by Sugar Magnolia » Tue Jul 16, 2019 7:09 am

MN-Skeptic wrote:
Tue Jul 16, 2019 4:52 am
What would you have to charge for a handmade item if you were to get $15/hour plus the cost of materials? I can’t imagine trying to earn a living by knitting or crocheting.
Several of our craftsmen are knitters or crocheters full-time and they get more orders than they can take for $100-$200 baby sweaters. Their costs are time, yarn, buttons and ribbon, and the yarn is charged in addition to the time. Crocheted adult shawls are in the $150 and up range. An eco-dyed $8 commercial silk scarf is $60-$150 and she sells dozens of them. Simple cotton dishcloths are $20 and the gallery can barely keep them in stock. My friend can knit a cotton dish cloth with Walmart cotton in about 20 minutes. She can crochet them even faster. She knocks them out while sitting in waiting rooms, in the pick up line after school and while she's watching tv. My costs on a quilt are by the hour (mine is over $15 but I work fast) materials including fabrics, batting and thread, and an additional 20% of that total to cover electricity, machine wear, etc. My prices are still only about middle-high for the other quilts at the gallery of comparable size and complexity. Any original quilts I make, or vintage quilts I finish include my time for designing, cleaning, repairing, and any other time directly related to making or acquiring them. The same goes for the potters, jewelers, weavers, wood turners and knife makers.

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Re: Fogbow Arts and Crafts Club

#836

Post by Slim Cognito » Tue Jul 16, 2019 8:49 am

I look at my crafting as therapy. It's cheaper than a shrink and I have something to show for it. I make things for parties, then give them to guests or donate them. My problem with my hats (other than not getting what they were worth) was I kept making ones I couldn't bear to part with.

I made a small zombie rag doll of Ed from Shaun of the Dead and took it to the Miami Beach Comicon where Nick Frost was appearing. He acted (hmmmmmm) thrilled with it and showed it to his crew before posing with me and the doll. Made my week.
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(This year's Halloween party theme is Shaun of the Dead so Zombie Ed is sitting on my chessboard awaiting his debut.)
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Re: Fogbow Arts and Crafts Club

#837

Post by WriteItDown » Tue Jul 16, 2019 10:13 am

A
Sugar Magnolia wrote:
Tue Jul 16, 2019 6:49 am
WriteItDown wrote:
Mon Jul 15, 2019 10:05 pm
Hi all

I don't know how to post an original post so must do it under "answer ". Sorry.
It is appalling to see how undervalued handmade goods are in this society. My quilting group decided to go on a short retreat to a nearby hot springs. None of us has much money so we had a booth at the 4th of July community craft fair. Hundreds of people attended and all we made was about $200. We had bed quilts, lap quilts, baby quilts and table runners along with my hand felted animals and sock gnomes. We sold 2 table runners, 5 Christmas spiders 2 gnomes, and 2 trivets. We thought that all were fairly priced. So, are we (crafters) the only ones that get paid about 2 cents an hour? Do not people realize how much time and effort it takes to make things?
on: :smokeears:
A lot of it is where you're trying to sell. Small craft fairs, farmer's markets, and other events (like parades) which set up craft booths as an afterthought to the main event rarely do well any more. The competition is pretty stiff in the makers markets to begin with, millennials are shedding possessions, not acquiring them, and the re-movement (re-purpose, re-make, re-cycle) has many more people hobby crafting than have in the past. A recent article in the American Craft Council (I think that's where I saw it) magazine said spending on hobby crafting is increasing, and traditional folk crafts such as quilting and knitting are growing. The Modern Quilt movement has brought many women back to the traditional craft, and popularity of Ravelry and similar sites have drawn in new knitters and crocheters. With so many making it themselves, it's harder and harder to find buyers.

Years ago people could sell hand crafted items for pin money but that's not so true any more without having a relatively unique product or high name recognition. Direct selling to the public, either through fairs and festivals or sites like Etsy are almost a full-time job just for the marketing and traveling and set up and all the other stuff that's required to sell like that, before you ever get to the actual crafting part of it. I sold for years at festivals, but limited myself to the ones I knew my target audience was attending. Multiple-day music festivals only, preferably tourist oriented, with big name musicians. That way, I knew the people seeing my work had interests that would make my stuff appealing to them, they had money to travel for the music festivals and were willing to spend it on an experience, and the festival was organized and successful enough to pay for well known musicians. I always made my expenses and occasionally did really well at the festivals, but my real income came from commissions after the fact. I knew going in I would have to either offer shipping or create pieces with an eye towards what could fit in a suitcase or trunk of a car. I also had to accept that I might not sell something until a year later (7 years in the case of a piece I sold this past Christmas) but when I did I could charge more because they never want THAT piece they saw, they want something custom that is similar to it.

Putting your work in adjudicated shows and galleries, or anything with a jury fee, pays better if that's an option for you. I can't remember ever selling an actual bed quilt at a show, but people don't bat an eye at spending upwards of $1000 for one at a gallery, or calling me months later to commission one, so I usually had at least one on display even though I didn't expect it to sell. Many of the "professional" crafters gripe about the craft hobbyists being competition for sales but I don't worry too much about them. People will pay for quality, but they will also pay for what they like. My house is full of handcrafted pieces and art from beginners. The professionals do have a point about weekend hobbyists who undercut on price though. Price your work at what it is worth, and don't undervalue it, or your time, by pricing it cheaply just to sell it. Not only does that train the buyers to undervalue crafts but it makes YOU undervalue your own work when it doesn't sell. That is a vicious cycle when you spend more time or money or effort making a better product to sell at a price point that was already too low.

Do any of the lawyers on here charge less than their time is worth just to get clients? Doctors? Plumbers? Mine don't, so why should I?

I have actually seen and touched one of Maybenaught's bags and know what they are worth. If you were selling them for less than $75, you were cheating yourself. I know the woman who bought the one at the Nasty Women show thought she was getting a killer deal at $100. Oddly enough, if you value your own time and work and price accordingly, so will other people. If I saw that bag priced at $25 I would wonder what was wrong with it or if it was badly made.

The moral of the story is that you have to put the time (lots of time) in to building your reputation and client base if you ever want to make any money at selling handcrafts, and do not undervalue your own skills and product.
How discouraging Sugar.
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Sugar Magnolia
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Re: Fogbow Arts and Crafts Club

#838

Post by Sugar Magnolia » Tue Jul 16, 2019 10:27 am

WriteItDown wrote:
Tue Jul 16, 2019 10:13 am
How discouraging Sugar.
Unfortunately, brick and morter stores feel the same way. Their competition is coming not only from makers themselves, but from on-line sales, Amazon and cheap imports.

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Slim Cognito
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Re: Fogbow Arts and Crafts Club

#839

Post by Slim Cognito » Tue Jul 16, 2019 10:41 am

And as much as i realize I'm contributing to the problem, when pinching pennies, one does what one can. When dressing my Barbie doll zombie horde, i could buy outfits at Walmart for $10 a piece, try to make them myself but with my arthritis, small-scale items like doll clothes are literally a pain, or I could order them for 99 cents an outfit on ebay. I just had to wait 4-6 weeks for delivery.

I ordered them on ebay.

It's a :pickle:
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Re: Fogbow Arts and Crafts Club

#840

Post by Sugar Magnolia » Tue Jul 16, 2019 10:59 am

Slim Cognito wrote:
Tue Jul 16, 2019 10:41 am
And as much as i realize I'm contributing to the problem, when pinching pennies, one does what one can. When dressing my Barbie doll zombie horde, i could buy outfits at Walmart for $10 a piece, try to make them myself but with my arthritis, small-scale items like doll clothes are literally a pain, or I could order them for 99 cents an outfit on ebay. I just had to wait 4-6 weeks for delivery.

I ordered them on ebay.

It's a :pickle:
Buying from Walmart isn't really supporting small business though any more than buying from ebay is, although you may actually be buying from a real human on ebay. I took the question to be about hand made products, and I am assuming you can take that 99 cent outfit and create something as a hand made final product that can be sold for a much higher price when it is transformed into "art."

People can also buy bed quilts from Walmart for hundreds of dollars less than they can from me, but they don't always.

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Slim Cognito
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Re: Fogbow Arts and Crafts Club

#841

Post by Slim Cognito » Tue Jul 16, 2019 11:35 am

Good points.
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Re: Fogbow Arts and Crafts Club

#842

Post by Maybenaut » Mon Jul 22, 2019 11:10 am

I’ve been making a lot of bags lately. Here are three batik totes and a corduroy purse. The totes all have slip pockets Front and back, soon between the straps. And the front also has a zippered pocket. Each tote has a slip pocket inside, with a zippered compartment in front of the slip pocket.

The corduroy purse only has a zippered pocket in front, there are no inside pockets. These are all my own designs.
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Slim Cognito
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Re: Fogbow Arts and Crafts Club

#843

Post by Slim Cognito » Mon Jul 22, 2019 11:19 am

Very nice.
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Re: Fogbow Arts and Crafts Club

#844

Post by Maybenaut » Fri Jul 26, 2019 12:09 am

Just finished this quilt top. It’s not my design... this is a Jinny Beyer kit I got from Craftsy.com a couple of years ago and have been chipping away at a little at a time.
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Re: Fogbow Arts and Crafts Club

#845

Post by Notorial Dissent » Fri Jul 26, 2019 12:49 am

That is really lovely. I really like the material you used. The quarter points are neat and a nice compliment to the main pattern.
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Re: Fogbow Arts and Crafts Club

#846

Post by RoadScholar » Fri Jul 26, 2019 6:27 am

Absolutely stunning. :lovestruck:
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Slim Cognito
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Re: Fogbow Arts and Crafts Club

#847

Post by Slim Cognito » Fri Jul 26, 2019 6:55 am

Wow!
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Re: Fogbow Arts and Crafts Club

#848

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Fri Jul 26, 2019 8:26 am

Beautiful!
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Re: Fogbow Arts and Crafts Club

#849

Post by Sugar Magnolia » Fri Jul 26, 2019 9:00 am

And you've motivated me to finish one of my recent quilts. Everything done but the binding so maybe I can get that knocked out today.

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Re: Fogbow Arts and Crafts Club

#850

Post by AndyinPA » Fri Jul 26, 2019 10:26 am

That's beautiful! I love the colors.

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