Recipes!

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tek
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Re: Recipes!

#2301

Post by tek »

update: asparagus and prosciutto = awesome!
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Re: Recipes!

#2302

Post by Whatever4 »

tek wrote:update: asparagus and prosciutto = awesome!
It's like food crack.
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Re: Recipes!

#2303

Post by Volkonski »

I had no idea that WW II British rationing was so stingy regarding cheese. :o

http://www.theoldfoodie.com/2017/02/the ... -1941.html
Cheese rationing began in May 1941 and remained rationed until 1954 – nine years after the war finished. At its most severe, the amount allowed for most folk was an almost-negligible one ounce per person per week (vegetarians and workers in some industries got more.) Over the next thirteen years the most common allowance was four ounces a week, with a glorious period in July 1942 when it was the luxurious amount of eight ounces a week.
For reference- a single slice of Kraft American cheese weighs 1 ounce.

Also, there is such a thing as Mock Pumpkin Pie! :shock:
¼ cup boiling water            ⅛ teaspoon ginger
½ cup Grape-Nuts               ¼ teaspoon cloves
 2 cups milk, scalded           ¼ teaspoon nutmeg
¼ cup sugar                          ½ teaspoon cinnamon
4 tablespoons flour              2 eggs, well-beaten
1 baked 9-inch pie shell.
Pour water over Grape-Nuts. Allow to stand 10 minutes, then add milk. Mix sugar, flour, and spices. Add to milk and Grape-Nuts mixture and cook in double boiler until thickened. Pour over eggs, stirring vigorously. Return to double boiler and cook 2-3 minutes longer. Cool. Pour into pie shell. May be served with whipped cream. Makes 1 pie or 12 tarts.
75 Ways To Enjoy A Famous Food [Grape Nuts] (1929)
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tek
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Re: Recipes!

#2304

Post by tek »

once again neighbors over.. rainy evening.. made Coq au Vin pretty much following https://www.gimmesomeoven.com/coq-au-vin-recipe

excellent.. I did the braise in a 275F oven because that's just how I do this sort of recipe.. used chicken legs, because they were on sale for $1.49/lb (normally I'd use thighs) ... seriously yummy..
coq_au_vin_sm.jpg
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Re: Recipes!

#2305

Post by Paul Lentz »

Volkonski wrote: <snip>
Also, there is such a thing as Mock Pumpkin Pie! :shock:
<snip>
During our early "leaner" years, CB would make a "mock apple pie" using Ritz crackers (no apples), plenty of cinnamon, sugar (white and brown) and butter (plus a homemade pie crust). She got the recipe from her Mom, who got it from HER Mom, a depression child. It was a mighty fine pie, and a big treat for us. :mrgreen:
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tek
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Re: Recipes!

#2306

Post by tek »

Paul Lentz wrote:
Volkonski wrote: <snip>
Also, there is such a thing as Mock Pumpkin Pie! :shock:
<snip>
During our early "leaner" years, CB would make a "mock apple pie" using Ritz crackers (no apples), plenty of cinnamon, sugar (white and brown) and butter (plus a homemade pie crust). She got the recipe from her Mom, who got it from HER Mom, a depression child. It was a mighty fine pie, and a big treat for us. :mrgreen:
A couple years ago we did a "60s dinner" with a bunch of neighbors.. one of the things we made was Ritz cracker mock apple pie.. which is an astounding thing, you would never guess there were no apples involved..

We are thinking about doing another 60s dinner this fall, might have to do the mock pumpkin pie ;)

PS: yes, we did a Jello mold.
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Re: Recipes!

#2307

Post by Paul Lentz »

tek wrote:
Paul Lentz wrote:
Volkonski wrote: <snip>
Also, there is such a thing as Mock Pumpkin Pie! :shock:
<snip>
During our early "leaner" years, CB would make a "mock apple pie" using Ritz crackers (no apples), plenty of cinnamon, sugar (white and brown) and butter (plus a homemade pie crust). She got the recipe from her Mom, who got it from HER Mom, a depression child. It was a mighty fine pie, and a big treat for us. :mrgreen:
A couple years ago we did a "60s dinner" with a bunch of neighbors.. one of the things we made was Ritz cracker mock apple pie.. which is an astounding thing, you would never guess there were no apples involved..

We are thinking about doing another 60s dinner this fall, might have to do the mock pumpkin pie ;)

PS: yes, we did a Jello mold.
Oh, God...a Jello mold. :lol: I may have mentioned here (several times) that my Mama (fine woman, with many fine qualities and skills) can't cook. Seriously, at her prime, she could make a disaster out of a pot of fresh string beans. But the woman could make a jello mold. Give her a can of fruit cocktail and a box of lime jello, and set her loose. 8-) Awful stuff, but if they gave out awards for the very best jello molds ever made, my Mama would win, hands down.

Moving on: I'm a fan of various "breads" (banana bread, zucchini bread; squash bread, etc.) made with "star" ingredients which are barely two steps away from the compost heap. Today I took two well-past-their-prime sweet potatoes and made a sweet potato bread that turned out to be a whole lot better than I imagined it would be:

SWEET POTATO BREAD (this makes two loaves)
2 C white sugar
1 C vegetable oil
3 eggs
2 C mashed sweet potatoes [peel your sweet potatoes; cut into chunks; into a pot with lightly salted water to cover; boil for 20 minutes; drain; mash with butter, brown sugar, and a bit of cream]
1 t vanilla
3 C flour
1/4 t baking powder
1 t baking soda
1/2 t salt
1 t each of cinnamon, ginger, ground cloves
1 C chopped walnuts

Preheat oven to 325º. In a large bowl, combine sugar, oil, eggs, sweet potatoes and vanilla. In a separate bowl, mix the remaining ingredients (except walnuts) together well, and then add to the wet ingredients. Stir until nicely combined. Fold in the walnuts. Pour into two regular loaf pans. Bake for 75 minutes, or until a knife inserted in the center comes out clean.

The sweet potato bread is nice plain; it's also a knockout served warm with a shmear of butter and of orange marmalade.
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vic
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Re: Recipes!

#2308

Post by vic »

Regarding apple pies which aren't made from apples - this is close...

My first job was as a programmer on the backup air defense system. A bunch of us (mostly from California) were sent to work at an AF station on Cape Cod. Churches and clubs would often have suppers to raise money, and one of my co-workers and his wife decided to go to one.

The way he tells it, he was expecting dinner, but when they sat down, they were served apple pie. He assumed he had gone to the wrong event, and wasn't quite prepared for dessert, but decided that since they had already paid, they might as well eat it.

Except it wasn't apple pie, it was clam pie. Probably would have been a fine supper, but when your taste buds are expecting apple pie, it's a rather rude surprise.

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Re: Recipes!

#2309

Post by Sugar Magnolia »

Paul Lentz wrote: Oh, God...a Jello mold. :lol: I may have mentioned here (several times) that my Mama (fine woman, with many fine qualities and skills) can't cook. Seriously, at her prime, she could make a disaster out of a pot of fresh string beans. But the woman could make a jello mold. Give her a can of fruit cocktail and a box of lime jello, and set her loose. 8-) Awful stuff, but if they gave out awards for the very best jello molds ever made, my Mama would win, hands down.
No cottage cheese or sour cream? Second place ribbon, at best.

My grandmother made "strawberry" preserves from figs and they were better than the real thing! The figs were plentiful and free but strawberries were a rare indulgence. She also made concord wine under the sink in her kitchen.

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Re: Recipes!

#2310

Post by Paul Lentz »

Sugar Magnolia wrote:
Paul Lentz wrote: Oh, God...a Jello mold. :lol: I may have mentioned here (several times) that my Mama (fine woman, with many fine qualities and skills) can't cook. Seriously, at her prime, she could make a disaster out of a pot of fresh string beans. But the woman could make a jello mold. Give her a can of fruit cocktail and a box of lime jello, and set her loose. 8-) Awful stuff, but if they gave out awards for the very best jello molds ever made, my Mama would win, hands down.
No cottage cheese or sour cream? Second place ribbon, at best.

My grandmother made "strawberry" preserves from figs and they were better than the real thing! The figs were plentiful and free but strawberries were a rare indulgence. She also made concord wine under the sink in her kitchen.

No, I don't recall jello molds with either cottage cheese or sour cream. However, I do have a (horrified) recollection of mayonnaise being whipped into the mixture. And Mama swings back into first place in the jello mold division at the Sunday supper on the ground. :pray:

Isn't it interesting how our geographic locales affect our "plentiful" and "scarce" foods? Some substantial portion of my father's kin here in Florida, mostly those centered in Hillsborough and Citrus counties, are/were/always will be strawberry (and blueberry, but that's more recent) farmers. We never went visitin' on a Sunday without coming home with a flat of strawberries, several jars of strawberry preserves, a few jugs or jars of strawberry wine, a jug of strawberry syrup, and at least one strawberry pie, and that was after having consumed some quantity of hand-cranked strawberry ice cream after dinner. By the time I was 5 years old, you'd have had to pay me to eat a strawberry.

Figs, on the other hand, were available in Central Florida, but not plentiful...just not a money crop here, at least not in my family. Our Georgia kin had a small stand of fig trees, but we weren't there enough for me to get sick of them. And, by the time I was 5 years old, I'd have paid every grubby little penny in my piggy bank for just one fresh fig.
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Re: Recipes!

#2311

Post by Chilidog »

Got some brats and a couple kabobs on the grill right now.

It's a bit cool out in the Chicago area tonight. But a beautiful afternoon nonetheless

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Re: Recipes!

#2312

Post by Chilidog »

Sugar Magnolia wrote:I built a deck at the studio this afternoon so I'm rewarding myself with an egg and olive sandwich for supper.
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Re: Recipes!

#2313

Post by Whatever4 »

Paul Lentz wrote:
Isn't it interesting how our geographic locales affect our "plentiful" and "scarce" foods?
Definitely. I used to work with the daughter of a lobsterman. She was always willing to trade her lobster lunch for PB&J or tuna salad. She was sick of so much lobster!

Also, cooked cherries are scarce up here. If something comes in 6 flavors, we get 5 -- no cherry. But blueberries? Big AND small. (Small are best, they are Maine blueberries.)
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Re: Recipes!

#2314

Post by Paul Lentz »

Whatever4 wrote:
Paul Lentz wrote:
Isn't it interesting how our geographic locales affect our "plentiful" and "scarce" foods?
Definitely. I used to work with the daughter of a lobsterman. She was always willing to trade her lobster lunch for PB&J or tuna salad. She was sick of so much lobster!

Also, cooked cherries are scarce up here. If something comes in 6 flavors, we get 5 -- no cherry. But blueberries? Big AND small. (Small are best, they are Maine blueberries.)

The history of lobster (from a culinary perspective) has always fascinated me. My understanding is that, early on (100+ years ago, in New England), lobster catches were simply a 'collateral damage' by-product of fishing, i.e., you pull up your cod nets and, along with your cod catch, you netted other stuff, including lobsters. The lobsters were considered a "trash" catch, so were parceled out to the servants and to folks in prisons and workhouses, who felt sorely abused by this division of the day's spoils. Somewhere along the way, apparently, the tables turned. I suspect Volky could give a far better perspective on lobster than I.

But yes. Anything which is in great abundance loses its value for those possessing it in that abundance. Besides strawberries, when I was growing up, I had a distaste for citrus (particularly oranges, tangerines and grapefruit). After all, my father was a grove caretaker--and I (and my siblings) a "grove rat," which is what the uptown kids in Orlando called those of us whose families were tied to, and worked, the groves still existing in Orlando back then--and we lived in a caretaker's shack at the edge of the grove. I know (now, I didn't know then) there were times, given our financial circumstances, when it was the abundant free citrus on the table (plus a very fine veggie garden) which probably kept us more than a step or two from malnutrition. All I knew then was that it was endlessly grapefruit for breakfast, a tangerine in my lunch sack (the other kids had apples or pears or a peach), and "ambrosia" (call it what you like, in our house, it was fuckin' oranges, a little coconut, some chopped maraschino cherries (which I still won't eat), and chopped pecans) at supper.

Of course, somewhere along the way, I managed to get over my disdain for strawberries, as well as citrus. Because of the continuing family agriculture connections and businesses, both are still easily obtained, but with pleasure and gratitude.
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Re: Recipes!

#2315

Post by Sugar Magnolia »

Paul Lentz wrote:
Whatever4 wrote:
Isn't it interesting how our geographic locales affect our "plentiful" and "scarce" foods?
...and "ambrosia" (call it what you like, in our house, it was fuckin' oranges, a little coconut, some chopped maraschino cherries (which I still won't eat), and chopped pecans) at supper.
Mmmmmmm....ambrosia is the one thing my mom makes for me when she does the every-child's-favorite-dish meals, except she puts whipped cream in it. Growing up, very skimpy on the (relatively expensive) whipped cream but half the bowl would be pecans. My great aunt owned a pecan plantation in the Delta and we ALWAYS had shelled and picked pecans in the freezer. Until she finally went in a nursing home, my grandmother would send everyone a shoe box full of either cracked or shelled and picked pecans at Christmas. The cracked ones came the last few years when her arthritis got so bad she could no long pick 12 or 15 boxes of pecans.

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Re: Recipes!

#2316

Post by Volkonski »

Paul Lentz wrote:
Whatever4 wrote:
Paul Lentz wrote:
Isn't it interesting how our geographic locales affect our "plentiful" and "scarce" foods?
Definitely. I used to work with the daughter of a lobsterman. She was always willing to trade her lobster lunch for PB&J or tuna salad. She was sick of so much lobster!

Also, cooked cherries are scarce up here. If something comes in 6 flavors, we get 5 -- no cherry. But blueberries? Big AND small. (Small are best, they are Maine blueberries.)

The history of lobster (from a culinary perspective) has always fascinated me. My understanding is that, early on (100+ years ago, in New England), lobster catches were simply a 'collateral damage' by-product of fishing, i.e., you pull up your cod nets and, along with your cod catch, you netted other stuff, including lobsters. The lobsters were considered a "trash" catch, so were parceled out to the servants and to folks in prisons and workhouses, who felt sorely abused by this division of the day's spoils. Somewhere along the way, apparently, the tables turned. I suspect Volky could give a far better perspective on lobster than I.

:snippity:
That's correct. Lobster began to be popular in the mid-nineteenth century when fast trains brought lobsters to large cities for the first time. About the same time boats were developed with water filled holds to store live lobsters.

Image

In coastal New England lobsters where fairly cheap into the 1950's. When I was a young boy we ate them quite often. After a day at the beach I would have the choice of a hot dog or lobster roll (I invariable chose the lobster roll). As commercial aircraft grew larger, lobsters learned to fly. This increased the market for lobster and the price went up. :( Now a lot of Maine lobster is shipped to China. :madguy:

The 1959 romantic comedy, It Happened to Jane , tells the story of a lobsterwoman's troubles when the railroad messes up and her shipped lobsters die.

Image

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0052933/
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Re: Recipes!

#2317

Post by RTH10260 »

Volkonski wrote: :snippity:

The 1959 romantic comedy, It Happened to Jane , tells the story of a lobsterwoman's troubles when the railroad messes up and her shipped lobsters die.



http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0052933/
Hmmm - did United Airlines run trains in the olden days too, also?

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Re: Recipes!

#2318

Post by tek »

Artichokes are in.

What's your fave artichoke recipe?

I usually do them up in a pressure cooker and then have my guests peel off the leaves and dip them in melted butter.. and of course divide up the heart at the end..

I need to perfect the wood-grilled artichoke that Rutherford Grill serves.. haven't gotten it yet.. but if you have a Hillstone group restaurant near you it might be on the menu now..
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Re: Recipes!

#2319

Post by Estiveo »

We use mayo instead of the melted butter and everybody gets their own so nobody has to share the heart. Some things one just doesn't share.
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Re: Recipes!

#2320

Post by Paul Lentz »

Estiveo wrote:We use mayo instead of the melted butter and everybody gets their own so nobody has to share the heart. Some things one just doesn't share.
Well, it's rare that we actually eat whole steamed artichokes (we do artichoke hearts, but as an ingredient in recipes, pretty often), but when we do, it's melted butter for us.

Two things I had never eaten until I was in my later 20's and had about a 3-month assignment in New York City:

1. Whole steamed artichokes...I'm having lunch at some toney place in NYC, and my companion (a very sophisticated woman from the HR department) says, "OH, I just LOVE the artichoke appetizer here! Let's get that!" Well, I was pretending not to be a rural southern rube, so I said, "Oh, yes, definitely!" Well, we did, and it was--of course--a whole steamed artichoke; drawn butter on the side. Sadly (tactical error), I attacked my artichoke with my knife, not my delicate fingers and teeth, without observing how it was properly eaten. My companion quickly recognized my ignorance, but was so cool and classy about it, and showed me how it was done. While I thought a whole steamed artichoke was okay, it just seemed like a fussy and skimpy thing to me, and it's never been a big favorite.

2. Sushi...when your main catch is catfish, bass, bream and mullet, let me promise you that you either pan-fry, broil, smoke, or maybe bake it. You sure as hell don't eat it raw. It wasn't long after I landed in NYC that my admin (a fellow) took me out to lunch, along with some other guys, and it was to a sushi restaurant. Well, I'd never tried it, but I'm always game, and I liked it super-much! And then (of course, you could probably see this coming, but I didn't...just too ignorant) my admin told me how much more I'd like it with a "healthy dab" of the "green mustard" "schmeared" on the piece of sushi roll. Of course, the "green mustard" was wasabi, and I generously plopped and smeared it on a piece of sushi like it was just a dollop of mayo or something. Well, you get the picture...I not only drank every beverage on our table, I snatched a full pitcher of some Japanese beer off the next table and downed it as well. Much laughter ensued while my eyes bugged out and watered; while I literally begged Jesus, Mary and Joseph for my next breath. HA HA. Okay...I still love sushi (although within my family, only our daughter shares the passion, but that sets up the perfect dad-daughter "date" ). And I still enjoy a schmear of wasabi, too, with great restraint.
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Re: Recipes!

#2321

Post by Sugar Magnolia »

About 10 years ago, my husband had triple by-pass surgery and every complication known to man for about 2 years afterwards. His doctors put him on a very restrictive diet so for the first time in 25 years I could cook anything I wanted without worrying about if he would eat it or not. He had his own food so I was free to cook whatever for our food. He wouldn't eat anything cooked with onions, bell pepper, tomatoes, corn, squash and a whole bunch of other stuff that I loved. After several years on his diet (which was even more restrictive than his life-long diet of meat, potatoes and green beans) he began tasting what I was cooking. WHAT!!!??? He actually likes all that stuff now and it didn't kill him. He has actually become a relatively brave eater even. Stuff he has always sworn he hated (corned beef hash, oysters, spinach) is now on regular rotation here. I've always been a cupboard cook and that was one of his complaints. He never knew what the same dish would taste like from one time to the next, but it's now one of his favorite things to taste what it is this time. He's even made suggestions from time to time. Y'all have no idea what a change that is from before his surgery. I am loving it too, because of all the stuff I left out of my cooking for so long has made a re-appearance and cooking for the 2 of us has become fun again with the freedom to experiment. It's a joy for me to go to NOLA and see him order stuff just because it looks good, with no thought to what is actually in it or if it's anything he's ever tasted before. He just eats it.

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Re: Recipes!

#2322

Post by Whatever4 »

My grandfather had his first heart attack in his 50. His doctor put him on a very restricted no-fat diet. Grandpa made his own special bread, cut out pretty much all fat from his life. Lost over 100 lbs.

20 years later, he mentioned to his doctor that his diet was pretty restricted. New doctor couldn't figure out why he was still on it -- he was only supposed to be that restricted for a few months. :crying: Grandpa went out and had a plate of bacon. He was pretty sensible about adding fat back i, but never went back to a regular diet. By then, he was in great demand as a dancing partner to all the widows in Florida and didn't want to disappoint the ladies.
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Re: Recipes!

#2323

Post by Volkonski »

Whatever4 wrote:My grandfather had his first heart attack in his 50. His doctor put him on a very restricted no-fat diet. Grandpa made his own special bread, cut out pretty much all fat from his life. Lost over 100 lbs.

20 years later, he mentioned to his doctor that his diet was pretty restricted. New doctor couldn't figure out why he was still on it -- he was only supposed to be that restricted for a few months. :crying: Grandpa went out and had a plate of bacon. He was pretty sensible about adding fat back i, but never went back to a regular diet. By then, he was in great demand as a dancing partner to all the widows in Florida and didn't want to disappoint the ladies.
It is wrong to disappoint a lady. At least that is what Mrs. V. always tells me. ;)
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Re: Recipes!

#2324

Post by tek »

Paul Lentz wrote:1. Whole steamed artichokes...I'm having lunch at some toney place in NYC, and my companion (a very sophisticated woman from the HR department) says, "OH, I just LOVE the artichoke appetizer here! Let's get that!" Well, I was pretending not to be a rural southern rube, so I said, "Oh, yes, definitely!" Well, we did, and it was--of course--a whole steamed artichoke; drawn butter on the side. Sadly (tactical error), I attacked my artichoke with my knife, not my delicate fingers and teeth, without observing how it was properly eaten. My companion quickly recognized my ignorance, but was so cool and classy about it, and showed me how it was done. While I thought a whole steamed artichoke was okay, it just seemed like a fussy and skimpy thing to me, and it's never been a big favorite.
Restaurants in the Hillstone group (at least Houstons and Rutherford) often have a wood-grilled artichoke appetizer on the menu.. totally deadly.. I still haven't managed to duplicate it..

Last night I brought steamed artichokes with hollandaise sauce .. [ I don't eff around with hollandaise sauce, I use Knorr ;) ] .. anyway, this couple pretty much only ever has whole artichokes with us.. which works out to a couple times a year, right around may-june.. so they forget how to eat them ;)

but they are soon in nom nom nom mode.. and then we get to the heart ;)

Truth be told, I like them with nothing else.. when I steam them I put lemon slices, a bay leaf, and sometimes a garlic clove in the water.. and I find they are fine without an added sauce..
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Re: Recipes!

#2325

Post by Patagoniagirl »

tek wrote:Artichokes are in.

What's your fave artichoke recipe?

I usually do them up in a pressure cooker and then have my guests peel off the leaves and dip them in melted butter.. and of course divide up the heart at the end..

I need to perfect the wood-grilled artichoke that Rutherford Grill serves.. haven't gotten it yet.. but if you have a Hillstone group restaurant near you it might be on the menu now..
Long ago, in a land far south of the equator, artichokes grew like dandelions in the yard. They were steamed in a pot on the wood stove, cooled a bit, split, then grilled over a wood fire dressed in a lemon butter sauce. Chimichurri was always on the table and went well with the lamb and artichokes. There wasn't a household without a gallon of pickled artichoke hearts in town.

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