Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

arock
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Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#251

Post by arock » Wed Nov 21, 2018 11:01 pm

80 FEMA trailers ready for Camp Fire evacuees

About 80 travel trailers are at McClellan Air Force Base near Sacramento as officials figure out where to deploy them.

Federal Emergency Management Agency spokesman Frank Mansell says there's no timeline for when the trailers will he placed for use, but it will likely take weeks.

Mansell says FEMA would ideally place trailers at the site of people's destroyed homes and is also looking for a larger site such as the fairgrounds. It takes time to assess whether the sites have appropriate electricity, sewer or septic and other infrastructure to support the trailers.

Mansell says FEMA is also working to put people in hotels or find them other sustainable lodging.
. . .
Record Searchlight (Redding) https://www.redding.com/story/news/2018 ... new-cookie

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Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#252

Post by arock » Wed Nov 21, 2018 11:05 pm

FEMA has kept a lower profile in Camp Fire than after hurricanes. Here’s the reason.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency has directed far less resources to helping California cope with the devastating Camp Fire than it typically sends to states dealing with the aftermath of a hurricane, or other natural disasters. But experts say that’s by design, as California’s robust disaster response planning and operations make the feds less necessary in the early stages of fighting a disaster.

FEMA, which is tasked with coordinating federal agencies in responding to a disaster, has so far issued fewer than 25 task orders to federal agencies for an estimated $1.5 million worth of assistance since the California wildfires were declared a major disaster on November 12, according to FEMA’s database of daily mission assignments.

That’s a far cry from the more than 140 orders FEMA issued in the first five days after Hurricane Florence was declared a major disaster on September 14, which collectively were estimated to cost more than $200 million.

The Camp Fire has so far claimed more than 81 lives and destroyed more than 13,500 homes and nearly 5,000 other structures, forcing those displaced to seek shelter in makeshift sleeping arrangements, such as the so-called “Wallyworld” camp in a Walmart parking lot in Chico. Experts estimate the fire could ultimately cause more than $7 billion in damages.
. . .
Sacramento Bee https://www.sacbee.com/news/state/calif ... re_stories

Good article, some comparison between California and Texas (disaster relief on county level).

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Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#253

Post by arock » Wed Nov 21, 2018 11:27 pm

If you've gathered with family for the holiday, consider filling out a "Family Emergency Communication Plan." Recommended: paper copy in with your emergency supplies/go bag.

https://www.fema.gov/media-library-data ... 150820.pdf

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Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#254

Post by arock » Fri Nov 23, 2018 12:38 am

Woolsey Fire, 100% contained Tuesday (or Monday?). No major mudslides or debris flows from the current storm.

==

Camp Fire.


camp fire 11-22.JPG
camp fire 11-22a.JPG


No info yet from sheriff's office on the one additional fatality.

The sheriff did announce that some maps and aerial/drone video are available at https://buttecountyrecovers.org/Maps . There's a Cal Fire map that shows structure status (% destroyed), and the graphic presentation of that information illustrates the extent of the destruction.

Drone video is new: side-by-side, aerial map (satellite view) of area with flight path marked on map, and the actual drone video. A marker on the map moves as the drone flies. There are also the 360 degree pan tilt images, same as produced for Carr Fire.

The parcel lines and before/after photos aren't there (part of the Carr Fire GIS info), and I don't know if that's planned. Residents have been asking when they and insurance adjusters would have access to properties, and in some cases this web site will provide enough visual information that site visits won't be needed immediately.

Here's a small portion of the Cal Fire structure map, showing part of Paradise.

camp fire cal fire map.JPG
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Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#255

Post by arock » Fri Nov 23, 2018 12:45 am

Camp Fire.

One hazard mentioned last week was that the fire had melted some of the plastic covers to septic tanks, as in, watch where you're going.

An article in today's LA Times shed new light on the hazard.
Butte County faces massive cleanup after Camp fire: 'It is a historic, almost biblical disaster'

For starters, Paradise has the dubious honor of being the largest municipality west of the Mississippi River to have no sewer system. Instead, its residents and business district off its main road — Skyway — rely on between 11,000 and 12,000 septic systems that are prone to failure, according to a city website dedicated to the issue.

Unfortunately for crews tasked with scraping the topsoil then removing debris, those systems sit in shallow basalt soil resting on hardened bedrock, said Clint Snyder, assistant executive officer for the Central Valley Water Board.

If they scrape too deep into the volcanic earth, equipment could compromise the septic system — which would spoil the location for future use in many cases, he said. Finding a new septic leach field that is far from a domestic drinking well to avoid contamination would be difficult, he said.
“Our biggest concern would be anything that impedes those folks getting into [their] homes as soon as possible,” he said.

City and state officials said any rebuilding effort should seriously consider modernizing Paradise’s infrastructure — specifically its sewer system. The town mayor said last week that an old study to add sewers to its business district should be updated and considered, and Snyder said state grants could help continue that work in the residential areas.

Even if all goes well and the debris is removed and the town’s septic systems come out unscathed, there’s the looming question of where to put all the rubble.
Los Angeles Times https://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la- ... ed-content

Another good article from the LA Times.

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Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#256

Post by RTH10260 » Fri Nov 23, 2018 5:45 am

and now the interview that Juan Browne had with the nurse after the Paradise evacuation


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Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#257

Post by arock » Sat Nov 24, 2018 1:18 am

camp fire 11-23.JPG
camp fire 11-23a.JPG
BCSO 11-23.JPG


The landscape was left denuded after the vegetation burned during the Camp Fire
in Concow. Heavy rains were expected Friday afternoon.
Paul Kitagaki Jr. pkitagaki@sacbee.com
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Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#258

Post by arock » Sun Nov 25, 2018 12:08 am

camp fire 11-24.JPG
camp fire 11-24a.JPG

No details from sheriff's office on the 3 additional fatalities or about the unaccounted-for list.

Edit: And 2 minutes later, here's the info.
bcso 11-24.JPG
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Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#259

Post by RTH10260 » Sun Nov 25, 2018 8:22 pm


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Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#260

Post by arock » Sun Nov 25, 2018 11:51 pm

Camp Fire is 100% contained. Info is from this morning's Cal Fire update.

camp fire 11-25.JPG



And from the sheriff this evening:

bcso 11-25.JPG


End of daily updates -- I'll probably do one occasionally, but feel free to jump in.

The sheriff's update is from twitter account: https://twitter.com/ButteSheriff

Cal Fire has probably cut back to once-a-day updates with the 100% containment:
http://www.fire.ca.gov/current_incidents (start page)

Camp Fire:
http://www.fire.ca.gov/current_incident ... Index/2277
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Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#261

Post by arock » Mon Nov 26, 2018 12:12 am



Photo by Dan Lindsay (From Memories of Fires Past. An exhibition at
the UC Santa Barbara Library examines the local community’s long
relationship with wildfires, 2014.)


Next photo and text from http://www.californiachaparral.com/fire/firenature.html:


Toyon (Heteromeles arbutifolia) resprouting after a fire.

chaparral regeneration.JPG




Adder's tongue ferns (Ophioglossum californicum) sprouting in the ashes four months after the Paradise Fire of October 2003. This interesting (and uncommon) member of the division Pterophyta (Order Ophioglossales) is rarely observed in the chaparral of southern California. The upright stalk (spike) bears 2 rows of spore-bearing sporangia. The sprounting shrub (right) is chamise (Adenostoma fasciculatum). Photo taken on the eastern slopes of Daley Ranch, north of Escondido. Since they sprout from perennial caudices, the adder's tongue ferns were presumably established in the chamise understory.
https://www2.palomar.edu/users/warmstrong/ww0604b.htm (More photos and text of plants after this Southern California fire)


Chaparral vegetation is well adapted to fire and regenerates readily after fire, either through sprouting from stem bases (lignotubers) or from soil-stored seed. Although mature chaparral consists mainly of shrubs, herbaceous plants are the dominant vegetation during the first few years after fire. Many of these "fire-followers" are annuals, the seeds of which have lain dormant in the soil since shortly after the last fire. Germination is stimulated by heat or by chemicals in smoke or charred wood.
https://www.fs.fed.us/psw/topics/fire_s ... rral.shtml
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Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#262

Post by RTH10260 » Wed Nov 28, 2018 10:31 pm

arock wrote:
Mon Oct 01, 2018 9:36 pm
Border agent to pay $220K for Tucson-area wildfire sparked at gender-reveal party

An off-duty Border Patrol agent was holding a gender-reveal celebration for his wife’s pregnancy last year when he accidentally started a 47,000-acre wildfire, his attorney said.
:snippity:
https://tucson.com/news/local/border-ag ... ac90b.html

Pima County changed a law regarding explosive targets.
the video that was made at the fiery event:

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Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#263

Post by RTH10260 » Sat Dec 01, 2018 5:33 pm

Juan Brown flies over the "Camp" fire area of Paradise



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Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#264

Post by arock » Mon Dec 03, 2018 1:42 am

The most recent update from the Butte County sheriff, dated December 1.

bcso 12-1.JPG

https://twitter.com/ ButteSheriff/status/1069054704779354113

This is how I die.

She is standing in the driveway of a sand-colored house — she doesn’t know whose — and the air is choked with smoke.

The sky is a nuclear orange. Wind is hurling embers against her body and into her blond wavy hair.

She has just seen an ambulance melt. Transformers are blowing up around her. Homes are caving in and trees are bowing. Fleeing cars have jammed the roads, and flames dance on both sides of the asphalt.
. . .
Los Angeles Times As deadly flames approached, a mother called her daughters to say goodbye


. . .
The intersection was home to a new strip mall. Its parking lot was freshly poured concrete. Two metal-roofed buildings were under construction. At its edge was Optimo lounge, a nightspot known for live music, karaoke and Chinese food.

The sloping landscape embraced the mall, creating a kind of bowl shape. The fierce winds shot over the bowl, which kept burning embers mostly at bay.

“It doesn’t mean this was the safest place in the whole entire Paradise ridge,” said Moldovan, the first full-time firefighter on the scene. “It just means that it was the safest place that we had access to at the time.”

As the fire transformed trees into torches, Moldovan and the law enforcement officers shepherded evacuees out of cars and onto the concrete lot. Volunteers helped people in wheelchairs trundle over curbs. Others served as lookouts, monitoring flames that neared the strip mall’s buildings and threatened the panicked crowd.

“Dogs, cats and pets. People bringing suitcases,” Moldovan recalled. “People crying, people reverting in the fetal position and sleeping on the curb.”
Los Angeles Times They thought they’d die trapped in a parking lot. How 150 survivors of California's deadliest fire made it out alive


Butte County Sheriff's Deputy Aaron Parmley was searching for a group of stranded nurses when he was forced to abandon his vehicle and continue the search on foot surrounded by flames.

As smoke blackened the sky, Parmley activated his body camera thinking it would capture the last moments of his life. He found the nurses and they set off on foot on the ember-lined road.

The deputy spotted a bulldozer in the distance, used his flashlight to flag down it down, and the driver took them to safety.
Santa Rosa Press Democrat
Bodycam footage shows rescue of nurses during Camp fire

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Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#265

Post by arock » Mon Dec 03, 2018 1:58 am

CHICO — Cindy Needham’s lifelong love of quilting began when she was 13 and now, that passion has taken a new turn.

Since the Camp Fire, Needham started a collection project to help quilters who lost everything. In this case, it means everything it takes to make a quilt. She has a quilting studio on Meyers Street, and while she usually teaches classes and hosts quilting groups there, the main purpose lately is getting quilting supplies to the evacuated quilters.

The loss for these quilters is immeasurable. “We have a very strong quilting community in Chico and Paradise and yes, a lot of the quilters in Paradise lost lifetime collections and in many cases it is their livelihood. Many quilters lost all of their quilts as well,” Needham said.

She has watched the quilters warm up to the idea of starting over.

“It took a bit for ladies to start arriving. They were all shattered and broken when they came through the door. Their stories were listened to, lots of hugs and Kleenex were passed around, and then they started walking around and petting the fabric and started smiling again,” Needham said.
. . .
She stresses that this is not her solitary project. She is not affiliated with a quilting group, but said Honey Run Quilters and Annie’s Star Quilt Guild are heavily involved in the effort to help evacuated quilters.
Chico Enterprise-Register From scissors to sewing machines, huge effort helps evacuated quilters start over



On Tuesday, Sierra Nevada will begin brewing a special IPA to raise money for fire relief efforts. The beer is called Resilience Butte County Proud IPA

The fire hit close to home for the company, with 15 percent of their employees losing homes in the fire.

Sierra Nevada Founder Ken Grossman reached out to other small breweries across the country and shared the recipe.

As of Tuesday morning, 998 breweries nationwide will be making and releasing the Resilience IPA and donating the proceeds. Sierra Nevada spokesperson Robin Gregory said they now hope to raise more than a million dollars through the fundraiser.
. . .
The company's hops and malt suppliers are donating the ingredients to make the beer, and Resilience Brewing Company gave Sierra Nevada permission to use the Resilience name temporarily.
KVAL Sierra Nevada brews up Camp Fire fundraiser with help from 998 breweries

It is a simple concept — to help one family impacted by the Camp Fire.

That idea has appealed to thousands of people looking for a way to help fire victims finding an endless scroll of GoFundMe pages online and donation centers at capacity. Eric and Heather Lofholm of Rocklin took that thought and turned it into a Facebook page, “Paradise Fire Adopt a Family,” where those in need can be linked up with helpers.

People can share on the page what they need or what they want to give. There are posts with offers ranging from cash payments to orders on Amazon, places to crash and even jobs.

“We can’t financially support a family, but we are willing to open our home to a family,” wrote Rob Gracom. “We live in Eldorado County. Please get back to us. We’d like to give a family a place for the holidays.”
Chico Enterprise-Record Looking for another way to help Camp Fire victims? You can “adopt” a family

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Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#266

Post by arock » Mon Dec 03, 2018 2:07 am

Forest Service: Roughly half of Coloradans now live in areas at risk of wildfire: Staggering new number jumps 50 percent in 5 years

. . .
The Colorado State Forest Service said Monday that between 2012 and 2017, the number of people living in at-risk areas increased by nearly 50 percent to a total of approximately 2.9 million people. Colorado's population in 2017 was estimated at about 5.6 million people, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.
. . .
A community is considered at-risk if it’s within a wildland-urban interface (WUI) area where development is within or close to a natural area with flammable vegetation.

The new wildfire risk assessment is the result of a major update to the Colorado Wildfire Risk Assessment Portal (CO-WRAP), an online mapping tool that provides data on wildfire risk, historic fire data and other important factors.

"We have updated the data and information for the Colorado Wildfire Risk Assessment through 2017," said Amanda West, manager of science information for the CSFS. "These data include new vegetation fuels derived from satellite imagery, new population and housing density data, and new weather data."

West said there are three major reasons for the increase in WUI population; there is a general trend in population growth in the WUI, ongoing land use changes in these areas, and updates/refinement of the source data compared to the 2012 Colorado Wildfire Risk Assessment.
. . .
The Denver Channel https://www.thedenverchannel.com/news/l ... f-wildfire

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Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#267

Post by arock » Mon Dec 03, 2018 2:21 am

It is possible that the death toll, which stands at 88, will rise, if some remains were overlooked or are found later in forests or other areas that were not searched.
. . .
The 10,000 specialists from across California and four other states — Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon and Texas — who assisted in the search for human remains have gone home, Sheriff Honea said. Any additional searches will be handled by the staff of the Butte County Sheriff’s office.

The experts who conducted the searches first checked what they called “Priority 1” locations — burned structures where the authorities had information from a firefighter, police officer or another emergency worker that led them to believe that someone had died there.

Once those locations had been scoured, search teams moved to “Priority 2” locations — areas where there was a relatively high probability of finding human remains, like mobile home parks or apartment complexes. Finally, the search teams mapped out and searched every other destroyed structure in the fire zone.
NYT https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/29/us/v ... ssing.html


Left behind by the Camp fire: Up to 8 million tons of debris
. . .
With more than 17,000 structures destroyed by the Camp fire, authorities will soon begin a cleanup that will test their ingenuity like never before: removal of an estimated 6 to 8 million tons of toxic rubble, soil and concrete strewn across 150,000 acres of mountain terrain, an area roughly the size of Chicago.

If all goes according to plan, what is expected to be the most expensive cleanup campaign in state history will be completed within six months to a year, allowing some displaced Paradise residents to begin rebuilding their homes by summer, said Sean Smith, state debris removal coordinator.
. . .
The project will be managed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, with help from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and state and county authorities, as well as thousands of contract workers.

It will begin in a week or two, Smith said, when certified crews arrive to assess levels of hazardous and carcinogenic materials such as lead, asbestos, pesticides, herbicides and propane tanks on a lot-by-lot basis.

In January, fleets of contracted bulldozers, dump trucks, cranes and track hoes with mechanical jaws at the ends of 30-foot hydraulic arms will swarm the narrow mountain roads of the Sierra foothills city, about 10 miles east of Chico.

Half of the debris — burned concrete and metal including vehicles — will be taken to a railyard in Chico and later transported to a recycling center.
. . .
Los Angeles Times https://www.latimes.com/local/californi ... story.html

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Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#268

Post by arock » Mon Dec 03, 2018 2:35 am

Meet the motorcycle-racing CoverGirl saving animals left behind in the Camp Fire
. . .
[ Professional motorcycle racer and makeup model Shelina] Moreda, a native of Petaluma, is a pioneer on the race track. She’s the first woman to have raced a motorcycle at Indy Raceway, home of the Indianapolis 500, and is one of only a few women competing professionally internationally and in the United States.

Last year, CoverGirl tapped her for its “I am what I make up” campaign.

Moreda, 30, said racing is her “dream job,” but for the last year, she’s also had a volunteer side gig: Rogue animal rescuer.

Since the night the Camp Fire barreled out of the foothills killing at least 88 people and burning most of the town, Moreda has been crossing active fire lines and entering the evacuation zone to save animals. Working as a county-registered volunteer, she has talked her way past law enforcement barricades, broken into homes (with owners’ permission) and even chased a swan into the back of a cop car, she said.
Sacramento Bee https://www.sacbee.com/news/state/calif ... 65885.html


Feather River Hospital says reopening a matter of when, not if

A spokesperson for the Feather River Hospital said on Friday that the hospital reopening was a matter of when, not if.

This comes two days after the word was that the hospital may not reopen, as damage from the Camp Fire continues to be assessed. The hospital is the largest employer in Paradise, with over 1,000 full-time and part-time employees.

“We are reopening,” said Jill Kinney, administrative director of marketing and communications for the Northern California region for Adventist Health, which owns the hospital.

Kinney said there was still no timeline for reopening facilities but that the hospital was committed to providing services to the Paradise community.
. . .
What is known is that the lower level of the hospital on Pentz Road suffered extensive damage and many outbuildings, including offices, were destroyed, Kinney said on Wednesday.

The cancer center, the emergency department, the maternity ward, the outpatient surgery center and the large clinic on Skyway are still standing, she said. The birth center has some water damage.

Some employees have been able to work out of nearby clinics in Chico and Marysville in the meantime. Many have lost their homes. All employees with jobs interrupted by the fire have been offered full pay and benefits through Feb. 5, Kinney said.
Chico Enterprise-Record https://www.chicoer.com/2018/11/30/feat ... en-not-if/

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Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#269

Post by arock » Mon Dec 03, 2018 3:55 pm

Sacramento Bee Insurer goes bust from Camp Fire with millions in claims outstanding. How will it affect Paradise homeowners?
Millions of dollars in potential losses from the Camp Fire have ruined a small Merced County insurance company, providing another element of uncertainty for homeowners following the deadliest and most destructive wildfire in California’s history.

Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones announced that his department has asked a judge to declare Merced Property & Casualty Co. of Atwater insolvent at a court hearing Monday afternoon in Merced. The ruling would put Jones’ department in control of the busted company.

The company is facing about $64 million in potential liabilities in Paradise, the Department of Insurance said in court papers filed in Merced County Superior Court. The sum is well more than the $23 million in assets the company controls.
. . .
Once the state has taken control of Merced Property, policyholder claims will be turned over the California Insurance Guarantee Association, an industry-funded group that pays claims when insurers go under.

Under state law, the association can pay up to $500,000 per claim, said the association’s executive director, Wayne Wilson. Any policyholder with a claim in excess of $500,000 will become a creditor in a court-supervised liquidation of Merced Property’s assets, he said.

The median value of an owner-occupied home in Paradise is a little more than $200,000, according to Census estimates. About 3 percent of the homes are valued between $500,000 and $1 million. It is unknown how many Merced policy holders will exceed the state cap.
. . .

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#270

Post by arock » Mon Dec 03, 2018 4:00 pm

Los Angeles Times Woolsey fire likely worst ever to hit Malibu, with home losses topping $1.6 billion, data shows
. . .
At least 670 structures were destroyed inside the Malibu city limits, including more than 400 single-family homes with an estimated market value of at least $1.6 billion, according to an analysis of aerial imagery and property records conducted by The Times and Zillow, the real estate website.
. . .
Los Angeles County emergency officials and state fire investigators haven’t released an official damage assessment of structures in Malibu. The Times identified destroyed buildings using property data and post-fire aerial footage released by Vexcel Imaging, a company that mounts cameras to fixed-wing airplanes and flies over areas after natural disasters.

The damage documented by The Times is just a portion of the almost 97,000 acres burned by the Woolsey fire, which destroyed a total of 1,500 structures in Los Angeles and Ventura counties and killed three people, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.

That makes the Woolsey fire one of the most destructive wildfires in state history, and the number of homes lost in Malibu is expected to surpass the totals recorded in devastating blazes there in 1993, 1982, 1978 and 1970, among others.
. . .
Good graphics and aerial (drone) footage of burned properties.

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Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#271

Post by arock » Mon Dec 03, 2018 4:07 pm

URL for Vexcel Woolsey Fire images (mentioned in post above):

https://maps.geointel.org/app/gic-publi ... 7%2C102100

Both before and after images, side by side with slider bar. The after images are more high definition than the before, you can really zoom in, and there's a search box for an address.

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Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#272

Post by arock » Mon Dec 03, 2018 4:41 pm

NASA Earth Observatory
Unusual Heat Fuels Fires in Queensland





Dozens of large wildfires raged in Queensland in late November 2018 as the state sweltered through an unusual heat wave. Several cities—including Cairns, Cooktown, Innisfail, and Mackay—broke temperature records, according to Australia’s Bureau of Meteorology. Cairns surpassed its previous November high by a full 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit).

The hot temperatures are clear in the temperature anomaly map below, which is based on data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite. It shows land surface temperatures (LSTs) from November 12, 2018 to November 26, 2018, compared to the 2000–2012 average for the same fifteen-day period.

Shades of red depict areas that were hotter than average; blues were cooler than average. White pixels were normal. Note that this map represents land surface temperatures (LSTs), not air temperatures. LSTs reflect how hot the surface of the Earth would feel to the touch in a particular location. They can sometimes be significantly hotter or cooler than air temperatures.
. . .
Small, scattered fires have burned in northeastern Queensland for all of November, but they began to proliferate and grow rapidly on November 24, 2018, following thunderstorms that raked the region with lightning and strong winds.

Australian officials have called the weather conditions “unprecedented” and “horrendous.” There is also plenty of fuel for these fires to burn because downpours from Cyclone Debbie in 2017 and Cyclone Marcia in 2015 helped build up vegetation in the region.

With meteorologists expecting the hot, windy weather to persist, firefighters are bracing for the fires to worsen, and they are urging people to monitor conditions closely and heed evacuation orders.



Wildfire Today has had several posts on the Australian wildfires. www.wildfiretoday.com

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#273

Post by arock » Mon Dec 03, 2018 4:46 pm

The Guardian Longer fire seasons threaten to disrupt US-Australia firefighting cooperation

Longer bushfire seasons in Australia and the US threaten to disrupt the sharing of vital personnel and equipment between the two countries, fire experts and coordinators have revealed.
. . .
In July the US requested help from Australia and New Zealand, which sent 188 personnel to help fight the blazes. That group has now returned.

For about 20 years, Australia and the US have exchanged personnel and equipment during major fires. But there are fears that, as climate change drives more severe blazes and lengthens fire seasons, those arrangements could be strained.

A fleet of aircraft, including six adapted helicopters and two Hercules water bombers, are also shared – spending the Australian winter fighting fires in the northern hemisphere before being contracted to fight bushfires in Australia’s summer months.
. . .
This year’s deployment of 188 Australian and New Zealand firefighters followed a group of 240 who crossed the Pacific in 2017.

Most of the Australian team is made up of “incident management specialists” – staff trained in a common system used to coordinate and deploy firefighting units.

“In California there are about 4,500 firefighters deployed or available and, at the height of the fires in the western US, there were about 29,000,” Ellis said. “Where we can help is that they tend to have large numbers of firefighters but they run out of incident management specialists.”
. . .

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#274

Post by HeatherGray » Mon Dec 03, 2018 5:00 pm

I don't know if I mentioned here that my sister owns a place in Paradise. It was a bequest from a family connection for whom she served as medical and financial POA during his final days. It contained a single wide trailer with an addition and two old cars. She had planned to clear the lot and sell it but hadn't gotten around to it yet. She sent me this photo of the property today.


arock
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Joined: Sat Jul 09, 2016 8:27 am

Re: Non-breaking Fire: Updates, Related Articles

#275

Post by arock » Tue Dec 04, 2018 11:56 pm

Thanks for the update on your sister's property; I'd been wondering if she'd managed to visit.

Maybe some good news in that the state will clear the property, and not-such-good-news that there will probably be a glut of Land for Sale parcels in a few months.

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