Racism in America Becoming Fashionable Again

boots
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Re: Racism in America Becoming Fashionable Again

#1301

Post by boots »

p0rtia wrote:
Mon Jul 29, 2019 1:33 pm
Tarrant wrote:
Mon Jul 29, 2019 10:21 am
:snippity:
So the question I posed to them was “What level of anti-gay sentiment would it take for you to consider re-assessing your support for a candidate?” The answer was usually something like “That’s a stupid/moot question because no one would take things to the level of suggesting killing or jailing gay people anymore”.

So fine; even if I’m dubious in some instances I can take people at their word when they say they support Trump but aren’t racist. But then I pose the same question - what level of abject racism would it take before they say “You know, I’m not comfortable supporting a guy who says these things?” Because if that level doesn’t exist, then they definitely ARE racist.
:bighug:
I get that. I'm not comfortable with it and that is (one of the reasons) why I don't support him.

But I still don't think everyone who does is a racist.

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Reality Check
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Re: Racism in America Becoming Fashionable Again

#1302

Post by Reality Check »

boots wrote:
Mon Jul 29, 2019 4:10 pm
:snippity:
But I still don't think everyone who does is a racist.
So what would you call them? Racism friendly? Racist tolerant?
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Re: Racism in America Becoming Fashionable Again

#1303

Post by RoadScholar »

You underestimate the slipperiness of racism, homophobia, etc. Many Repugs who don't consider themselves such will say things like:

"I'm OK with blacks as long as they act white."

"I'm OK with gays as long as I don't have to see them on TV and my children aren't exposed to them."

"I'm OK with immigrants as long as they speak English."

"I'm OK with Hispanics as long as my daughter doesn't marry one."

And so on. They have a thousand little ways of closeting their bigotry.
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Re: Racism in America Becoming Fashionable Again

#1304

Post by DejaMoo »

Turtle wrote:
Mon Jul 29, 2019 2:18 pm
Rush Limbaugh and Tucker Carlson tell them they're not racist, it's the people who accuse others of being racist who are the real racists.
AKA "label lynching", a term invented by the right wingers who accuse lefties of being snowflakes.
I've heard this bull before.

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p0rtia
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Re: Racism in America Becoming Fashionable Again

#1305

Post by p0rtia »

boots wrote:
Mon Jul 29, 2019 4:10 pm
p0rtia wrote:
Mon Jul 29, 2019 1:33 pm
Tarrant wrote:
Mon Jul 29, 2019 10:21 am
:snippity:
So the question I posed to them was “What level of anti-gay sentiment would it take for you to consider re-assessing your support for a candidate?” The answer was usually something like “That’s a stupid/moot question because no one would take things to the level of suggesting killing or jailing gay people anymore”.

So fine; even if I’m dubious in some instances I can take people at their word when they say they support Trump but aren’t racist. But then I pose the same question - what level of abject racism would it take before they say “You know, I’m not comfortable supporting a guy who says these things?” Because if that level doesn’t exist, then they definitely ARE racist.
:bighug:
I get that. I'm not comfortable with it and that is (one of the reasons) why I don't support him.

But I still don't think everyone who does is a racist.
boots, I respectfully recommend that you look a little more closely at the statements you are replying to. It appears that you have been reading "I think a MAGA hat is a racist symbol" as equal to "I think all Republicans are racist." I agree with the former, but though I made it clear that I did not agree with the latter, you responded as if I had.

The statement "I think everyone who supports 45 is a racist" is also a separate question (and still not equal to "I think all Republicans are racist" -- obviously because not all Republicans support 45). As various people have tried to explain, there is a case to be made that in the context of 2019 USA, there is no useful distinction between a racist and a person who supports or condones by word, vote, and deed a racist president. The result is the same. In that sense, I am happy to take the position that everyone who supports 45 is a racist.

Is the Republican party now a racist party running in 2020 on racist tropes, dog whistles and stereotypes? You bet it is.
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boots
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Re: Racism in America Becoming Fashionable Again

#1306

Post by boots »

p0rtia wrote:
Mon Jul 29, 2019 4:34 pm
boots wrote:
Mon Jul 29, 2019 4:10 pm
p0rtia wrote:
Mon Jul 29, 2019 1:33 pm


:bighug:
I get that. I'm not comfortable with it and that is (one of the reasons) why I don't support him.

But I still don't think everyone who does is a racist.
boots, I respectfully recommend that you look a little more closely at the statements you are replying to. It appears that you have been reading "I think a MAGA hat is a racist symbol" as equal to "I think all Republicans are racist." I agree with the former, but though I made it clear that I did not agree with the latter, you responded as if I had.
My apologies for that. Others here in the thread WERE making that generalization, I guess I lost track of exactly who.

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Re: Racism in America Becoming Fashionable Again

#1307

Post by Orlylicious »

Seems to me there's the real world, and the social media world. In the social world, the angrier you can get people with hateful rhetoric, the more clicks and views you get. Donald thinks all racist twitter is the real world. What I mean is so much is shit talking because there's no accountability (especially with anonymous social networks). For example, when that Parkland kid's racist tweets were revealed, Harvard dropped him. People are forgetting that this behavior is not acceptable in the real world but they will have a bolt of lightning hit.

Racist Comments Cost Conservative Parkland Student a Place at Harvard
By Patricia Mazzei June 17, 2019

MIAMI — Of the many student activists who emerged from the tragic shooting last year at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., Kyle Kashuv stood out as a conservative defender of the Second Amendment, surrounded by classmates who were mobilizing for sweeping new controls on guns.

He used that distinction to get meetings with the likes of President Trump and successfully push for what he believed would be more effective federal legislation to improve school security and help detect potential threats of violence at schools, as he proudly related in his admission essay to Harvard College.
***
“My intent was never to hurt anyone,” Mr. Kashuv wrote to the college. “I also feel I am no longer the same person, especially in the aftermath of the Parkland shooting and all that has transpired since.”

The Google Doc comments were made late at night as the students tried to outdo each other with outrageous remarks, Mr. Kashuv said in the interview on Monday, describing himself as thoughtless and immature at the time.

“In the same document, I said a bunch of anti-Semitic stuff,” he acknowledged. “That’s not who I am. My parents are Jewish. I’m Jewish. I go to synagogue every single week now — I’ve been going the past few weeks.”
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/17/us/p ... rvard.html


Racism is often a manifestation of fear... the census shows that whites will become a minority by 2045 and that's scary to a lot of people. Anonymously they can act out on that. But while I have family and friends that truly are racist, they are generally much older, not well educated, and looking for anyone to blame. My Dad calls it "othering". Donald specializes in it.

A comment upthread was right on for me... all we can do is live our best lives, try to set a good example, and hope that hearts and minds can be changed through love and acceptance. As terrible as all this that Donald is unleashing is, I truly believe that many people are quietly deciding they don't want to live in Trump's America. I'm often wrong but hope this smacks the spineless GOP in the ballot box. Donald's made it clear in his evil mind this will get him reelected. There are 463 days until the 2020 election (h/t: Alexa). It's impossible to imagine this level of anger and hate can be sustained for 15 months. I deeply hope not.

The US will become ‘minority white’ in 2045, Census projects

New census population projections confirm the importance of racial minorities as the primary demographic engine of the nation’s future growth, countering an aging, slow-growing and soon to be declining white population. The new statistics project that the nation will become “minority white” in 2045. During that year, whites will comprise 49.7 percent of the population in contrast to 24.6 percent for Hispanics, 13.1 percent for blacks, 7.9 percent for Asians, and 3.8 percent for multiracial populations (see Figure 1).

The shift is the result of two trends. First, between 2018 and 2060, gains will continue in the combined racial minority populations, growing by 74 percent. Second, during this time frame, the aging white population will see a modest immediate gain through 2024, and then experience a long-term decline through 2060, a consequence of more deaths than births (see Figure 2).
https://www.brookings.edu/blog/the-aven ... -projects/

April 2019 Pew Research Poll on Race in America: https://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2019/04 ... rica-2019/

Here are some of the key findings (nearly 6500 were in the poll):
Most Americans say it’s now more common for people to express racist or racially insensitive views; more than four-in-ten say it’s more acceptable

Most say it’s now more common for people to express racist or racially insensitive views. Most Americans (65%) – including majorities across racial and ethnic groups – say it has become more common for people to express racist or racially insensitive views since Trump was elected president. A smaller but substantial share (45%) say this has become more acceptable.

Democrats and those who lean Democratic are more likely than Republicans and Republican leaners to say it has become more common and more acceptable for people to express racist and racially insensitive views since Trump was elected president. Among Democrats, 84% say this is now more common and 64% say it’s more acceptable; fewer than half of Republicans say it has become more common (42%) and just 22% say it has become more acceptable for people to express these types of views.

Views of Trump’s handling of race relations are far more negative than views of how Obama handled the issue

A majority of U.S. adults say Trump has made race relations worse. A majority of Americans (56%) say Trump has made race relations worse; just 15% say he has made progress toward improving race relations, while 13% say he has tried but failed to make progress and 14% say he hasn’t addressed this issue. In contrast, 37% say Barack Obama made progress on race relations when he was president, and 27% say he tried but failed.2 A quarter of Americans say Obama made race relations worse. These retrospective views of Obama’s handling of race relations are nearly identical to views expressed during Obama’s last year in office.

Not surprisingly, assessments of Trump’s and Obama’s handling of race relations differ considerably along partisan lines. Democrats overwhelmingly say Trump has made race relations worse (84%), including large shares of black (79%) and white (86%) Democrats. Views are more divided among Republicans. About a third of Republicans (34%) say Trump has improved race relations and 25% say he has tried but failed to make progress; 19% of Republicans say he hasn’t addressed the issue, while 20% say he has made race relations worse.

When it comes to views of Obama’s handling of race relations, 55% of Democrats say he improved race relations during his presidency; just 8% say he made things worse. In contrast, 51% of Republicans say Obama made race relations worse, while 14% say he made progress toward improving it. As is the case with views of Trump’s handling of race relations, white and black Democrats offer somewhat similar assessments of how Obama handled this issue when he was president.

Republicans and Democrats have vastly different views on race

White Republicans, white Democrats differ widely in their views of the country’s racial progress In addition to being linked to views of Trump’s handling of race relations, partisanship is strongly associated with racial attitudes more broadly. In fact, after controlling for other factors, partisanship has a greater association with views about the country’s racial progress than demographic factors, though being young and more educated are also significant predictors, particularly among whites.3

Because whites and nonwhites often have widely different views of racial issues, and nonwhites disproportionately identify with or lean to the Democratic Party, gaps between Republicans and Democrats are often shown among whites in this report in order to account for differences in the racial composition of the two parties.4

White Democrats (64%) are far more likely than white Republicans (15%) to say the country hasn’t gone far enough when it comes to giving black people equal rights with whites. About half of Republicans say it’s been about right, while a sizable minority (31%) says the country has gone too far in this regard.

Eight-in-ten white Democrats – vs. 40% of white Republicans – say the legacy of slavery continues to have an impact on black people’s position in American society today. And when it comes to views about racial discrimination, 78% of white Democrats say the bigger problem is people not seeing it where it really does exist, while a similar share of white Republicans say people seeing racial discrimination where it really does not exist is the bigger problem.

Blacks are more likely than other groups to say their race has had a negative impact on their ability to get ahead; whites are the most likely to say their race helped them

About half of blacks say being black has hurt their ability to get ahead. About half of black adults (52%) say being black has hurt their ability to get ahead at least a little, with 18% saying it has hurt a lot. About a quarter of Hispanics and Asians (24% each) and just 5% of whites say their race or ethnicity has had a negative impact. In turn, whites are more likely than other groups to say their racial background has helped them at least a little.

Among blacks, those with at least some college experience are more likely than those with less education to say being black has hurt their ability to get ahead.

Education is also linked with whites’ perceptions of the impact their race has had on their ability to get ahead. Small shares of whites across educational levels say their racial background has hurt their ability to succeed, but those with a bachelor’s degree are more likely than those with less education to say being white helped them at least a little.

Across all racial and ethnic groups, more point to their own hard work than to any other attribute, including their race, their gender, the people they know or their family’s financial situation, as something that helped them get ahead.

Blacks, whites differ in assessments of why it may be harder for black people to get ahead

Blacks are far more likely than whites to say discrimination is a major obstacle for black people. Whether or not they see their race as an obstacle for them personally, about two-thirds of blacks (68%) say being black generally hurts a person’s ability to get ahead in the country; 55% of whites say the same.

Among those who say being black hurts a person’s ability to get ahead, blacks are far more likely than whites to point to racial discrimination, less access to high-paying jobs and less access to good schools as major reasons why this is the case. In turn, whites are more likely than blacks to point to family instability and lack of good role models as major obstacles for black people. The same shares in both groups (22%) say a lack of motivation to work hard is to blame.

There are wide partisan gaps in these views. Most white Democrats who say being black hurts a person’s ability to succeed point to racial discrimination (70%) and less access to good schools (75%) or high-paying jobs (64%) as major reasons for this (among black Democrats, the shares are 86%, 74% and 78%, respectively). By comparison, about a third or fewer white Republicans say these are major obstacles for blacks. White Republicans are more likely than white Democrats to cite family instability, lack of good role models and a lack of motivation to work hard.

Majorities of black and white adults say blacks are treated less fairly than whites in dealing with police and by the criminal justice system

Whites and blacks differ widely in views of how blacks are treated. Black and white adults have widely different perceptions of how blacks are treated in America, but majorities of both groups say blacks are treated less fairly than whites by the criminal justice system (87% of blacks vs. 61% of whites) and in dealing with police (84% vs. 63%, respectively).

About six-in-ten blacks or more – but fewer than half of whites – say blacks are treated less fairly than whites in hiring, pay and promotions; when applying for a loan or mortgage; in stores or restaurants; when voting in elections; and when seeking medical treatment. In each of these realms, whites tend to say blacks and whites are treated about equally; very small shares say whites are treated less fairly than blacks.

Across these different areas, there are gaps ranging from 39 to 53 percentage points in how white Democrats and white Republicans see the treatment of blacks in the U.S. About half or more white Democrats say blacks are treated less fairly than whites in dealing with the police (88% vs. 43% of white Republicans); by the criminal justice system (86% vs. 39%); in hiring, pay and promotions (72% vs. 21%); when applying for a mortgage or loan (64% vs. 17%); in stores or restaurants (62% vs. 16%); when voting in elections (60% vs. 7%); and when seeking medical treatment (48% vs. 9%).

In some of these areas, black and white Democrats express similar views, but larger shares of black Democrats say black people are treated less fairly than whites in employment situations (86%), when applying for a loan or mortgage (78%), in stores or restaurants (73%), and when seeking medical treatment (61%).

Most Americans, including similar shares of whites and blacks, say it’s never acceptable for a white person to use the N-word

Black and white adults have similar views on use of the N-word. Seven-in-ten U.S. adults say they, personally, think it’s never acceptable for a white person to use the N-word; 13% say this is rarely acceptable and about one-in-ten say it is always (3%) or sometimes (6%) acceptable for a white person to use the N-word. Roughly seven-in-ten whites and blacks say this is never acceptable.

A smaller share of Hispanics (58%) say it’s never acceptable for a white person to use the N-word, but this is driven in part by the relatively large share of foreign-born Hispanics (28%) who say they are not sure whether it’s acceptable for a white person to use the N-word. Among Hispanics born in the U.S., 67% say this is never acceptable.

When it comes to black people using the N-word, about four-in-ten adults – including similar shares of blacks and whites – say they, personally, think it is never acceptable; 15% say it is rarely acceptable and about a third say it’s always (13%) or sometimes (20%) acceptable for black people to use the N-word.

That tape of Donald using the N word is out there, Mark Burnett can keep trying to bury it and it shouldn't come out until, say, October 2020. But that would be the final straw for a lot of voters, but honest GOP and galvanizing the Democratic base. It's going to be a depressing 15 months but we all know that already.
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much ado
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Re: Racism in America Becoming Fashionable Again

#1308

Post by much ado »

boots wrote:
Sun Jul 28, 2019 5:59 pm
RoadScholar wrote:
Sun Jul 28, 2019 5:49 pm
“Make America Great Again” contains implicit racism, misogyny, xenophobia, and intolerance, according to the subscriber’s understanding of why (to them) America is no longer great.

What do they want to go back to? What is the “lost” greatness made of?

I have heard Trump supporters say that America was denigrated and weakened by at least one of the following:

The Civil Rights revolution. Feminism. Immigration. Women having the vote. Allowing people to speak languages other than English. Environmental protection. Public health initiatives. Having to work beside gay folk. Freedom of the press. Mixed-race marriages. Child protective services. Income tax. Multilateral agreements and treaties. Same-sex marriage. Jews and Muslims integrated into our society. Renewable energy.

Do you agree? Does anyone agree who is not a racist, homophobe, misogynist, or bigot? (I include those who harbor those beliefs but are in denial about them.)

More importantly, how does holding those views about why America is no longer great square with our most basic American values? With “We hold these Truths to be self-evident that all men are created equal?” With “Congress is empowered to pass laws to promote the general welfare?” With “I lift my lamp beside the golden door?”

It doesn’t. It goes against these values. Instead of seeing that all these things have gradually enhanced our greatness, it longs for a return to protectionism, Protestant Anglo-Saxon hegemony, straight male dominance... and brutally-enforced conformity with all of the above.
Aw crap. You guys are going make me argue stuff that sounds pro-Trump. I think many people are nostalgic for things of the past, in politics and otherwise, and for simpler times in general. I think there are a lot of people who may wear such a hat (and I'm not one of them, to be clear) who get there because they identify as Republicans.
Give me an actual date when times were simpler. "Simpler times" is imaginary. TImes were never simpler.

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Re: Racism in America Becoming Fashionable Again

#1309

Post by Jeffrey »

boots wrote:
Mon Jul 29, 2019 4:10 pm
I get that. I'm not comfortable with it and that is (one of the reasons) why I don't support him.

But I still don't think everyone who does is a racist.
This place is majority #nevertrump-ers so there's things you just can't say without people jumping down your throat. Better to just avoid certain topics.

boots
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Re: Racism in America Becoming Fashionable Again

#1310

Post by boots »

much ado wrote:
Mon Jul 29, 2019 5:00 pm
Give me an actual date when times were simpler. "Simpler times" is imaginary. TImes were never simpler.
I didn't say there was one. I described that many people feel that way.

Next!

boots
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Re: Racism in America Becoming Fashionable Again

#1311

Post by boots »

Jeffrey wrote:
Mon Jul 29, 2019 5:10 pm
boots wrote:
Mon Jul 29, 2019 4:10 pm
I get that. I'm not comfortable with it and that is (one of the reasons) why I don't support him.

But I still don't think everyone who does is a racist.
This place is majority #nevertrump-ers so there's things you just can't say without people jumping down your throat. Better to just avoid certain topics.
Yep. Maybe I need to just avoid this place for a couple of years, or longer, until the elections are over and the level of angst decreases.

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Re: Racism in America Becoming Fashionable Again

#1312

Post by much ado »

boots wrote:
Mon Jul 29, 2019 5:29 pm
much ado wrote:
Mon Jul 29, 2019 5:00 pm
Give me an actual date when times were simpler. "Simpler times" is imaginary. TImes were never simpler.
I didn't say there was one. I described that many people feel that way.

Next!
You might have pointed out that feeling nostalgic for times that never existed is delusional. Your implication was that this is a valid desire.

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Re: Racism in America Becoming Fashionable Again

#1313

Post by Whatever4 »

boots wrote:
Mon Jul 29, 2019 5:29 pm
much ado wrote:
Mon Jul 29, 2019 5:00 pm
Give me an actual date when times were simpler. "Simpler times" is imaginary. TImes were never simpler.
I didn't say there was one. I described that many people feel that way.

Next!
I remember a survey that showed “simpler times” meant whenever the respondent was a kid. (Crosstabs of birth years and simpler times perceptions)
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Re: Racism in America Becoming Fashionable Again

#1314

Post by boots »

much ado wrote:
Mon Jul 29, 2019 7:21 pm
boots wrote:
Mon Jul 29, 2019 5:29 pm
much ado wrote:
Mon Jul 29, 2019 5:00 pm
Give me an actual date when times were simpler. "Simpler times" is imaginary. TImes were never simpler.
I didn't say there was one. I described that many people feel that way.

Next!
You might have pointed out that feeling nostalgic for times that never existed is delusional. Your implication was that this is a valid desire.
No, the implication was that it was a common desire.

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Re: Racism in America Becoming Fashionable Again

#1315

Post by Sugar Magnolia »

All of this overt racism is Obama's fault. If we hadn't elected (twice!) a Black president, all these knuckle-draggers wouldn't have had to bite their tongues for 8 long years. This is just rebound racism that was pent up and festering for so long and is now acceptable. They're just catching up with the "lost years" of Obama. Making up for lost time, as it were.

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Re: Racism in America Becoming Fashionable Again

#1316

Post by Orlylicious »

Thought about that Sugar, the pendulum always seems to swing hard after a two term president, but this is nuts.

Paul Krugman's column was after my post but hits a lot of points. I'm sharing with my friends here. What he's talking about really is happening and the people there know it. Ask Mark Kessler.


A Racist Stuck in the Past
In Trump’s mind, it’s still 1989.
By Paul Krugman Opinion Columnist July 29, 2019

As evidence grew in 2002 to exonerate the Central Park Five, their supporters demanded an apology from Donald Trump, who, soon after their arrest, had called for the return of the death penalty.

Let’s get the obvious stuff out of the way. Yes, Donald Trump is a vile racist. He regularly uses dehumanizing language about nonwhites, including members of Congress. And while some argue that this is a cynical strategy designed to turn out Trump’s base, it is at most a strategy that builds on Trump’s pre-existing bigotry. He would be saying these things regardless (and was saying such things long before he ran for president); his team is simply trying to turn bigoted lemons into political lemonade.

What I haven’t seen pointed out much, however, is that Trump’s racism rests on a vision of America that is decades out of date. In his mind it’s always 1989. And that’s not an accident: The ways America has changed over the past three decades, both good and bad, are utterly inconsistent with Trump-style racism.

Why 1989? That was the year he demanded bringing back the death penalty in response to the case of the Central Park Five, black and Latino teenagers convicted of raping a white jogger in Central Park. They were, in fact, innocent; their convictions were vacated in 2002. Trump, nevertheless, has refused to apologize or admit that he was wrong.

His behavior then and later was vicious, and it is no excuse to acknowledge that at the time America was suffering from a crime wave. Still, there was indeed such a wave, and it was fairly common to talk about social collapse in inner-city urban communities.

But Trump doesn’t seem to be aware that times have changed. His vision of “American carnage” is one of a nation whose principal social problem is inner-city violence, perpetrated by nonwhites. That’s a comfortable vision if you’re a racist who considers nonwhites inferior. But it’s completely wrong as a picture of America today.

For one thing, violent crime has fallen drastically since the early 1990s, especially in big cities. Our cities certainly aren’t perfectly safe, and some cities — like Baltimore — haven’t shared in the progress. But the social state of urban America is vastly better than it was.

On the other hand, the social state of rural America — white rural America — is deteriorating. To the extent that there really is such a thing as American carnage — and we are in fact seeing rising age-adjusted mortality and declining life expectancy — it’s concentrated among less-educated whites, especially in rural areas, who are suffering from a surge in “deaths of despair” from opioids, suicide and alcohol that has pushed their mortality rates above those of African-Americans.

And indicators of social collapse, like the percentage of prime-age men not working, have also surged in the small town and rural areas of the “eastern heartland,” with its mostly white population.

What this says to me is that the racists, and even those who claimed that there was some peculiar problem with black culture, were wrong, and the sociologist William Julius Wilson was right.

When social collapse seemed to be basically a problem for inner-city blacks, it was possible to argue that its roots lay in some unique cultural dysfunction, and quite a few commentators hinted — or in some cases declared openly — that there was something about being nonwhite that predisposed people toward antisocial behavior.

What Wilson argued, however, was that social dysfunction was an effect, not a cause. His work, culminating in the justly celebrated book “When Work Disappears,” made the case that declining job opportunities for urban workers, rather than some underlying cultural or racial disposition, explained the decline in prime-age employment, the decline of the traditional family, and more.

How might one test Wilson’s hypothesis? Well, you could destroy job opportunities for a number of white people, and see if they experienced a decline in propensity to work, stopped forming stable families, and so on. And sure enough, that’s exactly what has happened to parts of nonmetropolitan America effectively stranded by a changing economy.

I’m not saying that there’s something wrong or inferior about the inhabitants of, say, eastern Kentucky (and no American politician would dare suggest such a thing). On the contrary: What the changing face of American social problems shows is that people are pretty much the same, whatever the color of their skin. Give them reasonable opportunities for economic and personal advancement, and they will thrive; deprive them of those opportunities, and they won’t.

Which brings us back to Trump and his attack on Representative Elijah Cummings, whom he accused of representing a district that is a “mess” where “no human being would want to live.” Actually, part of the district is quite affluent and well educated, and in any case, Trump is debasing his office by, in effect, asserting that some Americans don’t deserve political representation.

But the real irony is that if you ask which congressional districts really are “messes” in the sense of suffering from severe social problems, many — probably most — strongly supported Trump in 2016. And Trump is, of course, doing nothing to help those districts. All he has to offer is hate.
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p0rtia
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Re: Racism in America Becoming Fashionable Again

#1317

Post by p0rtia »

Apropos of not much, it struck me today that one of the main reasons--perhaps THE main reason--45 spews out so much hate and so many personal insults in every situation is that he doesn't know what any of the actual issues are. He can't debate. He can't discuss. He can say yes, no, and fuck you, you piece of stinking shit (words to that effect). It's so horrible that people forget what the point was.

My god, people were talking about Baltimore all day. Baltimore. As if that were the story.

:brickwallsmall: :brickwallsmall: :brickwallsmall:
No matter where you go, there you are! :towel:
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Dan1100
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Re: Racism in America Becoming Fashionable Again

#1318

Post by Dan1100 »

Sugar Magnolia wrote:
Mon Jul 29, 2019 8:53 pm
All of this overt racism is Obama's fault. If we hadn't elected (twice!) a Black president, all these knuckle-draggers wouldn't have had to bite their tongues for 8 long years. This is just rebound racism that was pent up and festering for so long and is now acceptable. They're just catching up with the "lost years" of Obama. Making up for lost time, as it were.
I totally agree it is racist backlash from Obama.

If you look at Missouri, before Obama, it was a 50/50 bellwether state where either the Republican or Democrats could win any statewide office. Now, after Obama, Right to Work, Campaign Finance/anti-Gerrymandering, Medical Weed, and Minimum Wage all went the Democrat's way by pretty big margins in statewide referendums, but a Democrat can't get elected to statewide office.

I believe that's because 10-15% of the electorate are straight up racists who would vote for the Democrats on the issues except that after Obama (and Ferguson) as far as they are concerned, the Democrats are the n-word party.

Jeffrey
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Re: Racism in America Becoming Fashionable Again

#1319

Post by Jeffrey »

Dan1100 wrote:
Mon Jul 29, 2019 11:29 pm
I believe that's because 10-15% of the electorate are straight up racists who would vote for the Democrats on the issues except that after Obama (and Ferguson) as far as they are concerned, the Democrats are the n-word party.
I'd say that's where there's a split in terms of strategy. Obama and the dems didn't gain any votes by mishandling Ferguson but certainly lost votes for it as you point out. Dems lose votes when they cater to the fringes of their base but as Trump proved, that's not true for the GOP.

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Reality Check
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Re: Racism in America Becoming Fashionable Again

#1320

Post by Reality Check »

Jeffrey wrote:
Tue Jul 30, 2019 6:26 am

I'd say that's where there's a split in terms of strategy. Obama and the dems didn't gain any votes by mishandling Ferguson but certainly lost votes for it as you point out. Dems lose votes when they cater to the fringes of their base but as Trump proved, that's not true for the GOP.
Oh wait, so questioning why an armed police officer shot and killed an unarmed black kid is "mishandling". I think things are becoming clear to me. :roll:

The base of the Republican party is racist. It isn't the fringe.
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RTH10260
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Re: Racism in America Becoming Fashionable Again

#1321

Post by RTH10260 »

p0rtia wrote:
Mon Jul 29, 2019 11:14 pm
Apropos of not much, it struck me today that one of the main reasons--perhaps THE main reason--45 spews out so much hate and so many personal insults in every situation is that he doesn't know what any of the actual issues are. He can't debate. He can't discuss. He can say yes, no, and fuck you, you piece of stinking shit (words to that effect). It's so horrible that people forget what the point was.

My god, people were talking about Baltimore all day. Baltimore. As if that were the story.

:brickwallsmall: :brickwallsmall: :brickwallsmall:
:shh: That would require him to read, really read full articles and books, and absorb the content.

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p0rtia
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Re: Racism in America Becoming Fashionable Again

#1322

Post by p0rtia »

Yup. And to give a fuck about what anybody else said. Ever.
No matter where you go, there you are! :towel:
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Jeffrey
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Re: Racism in America Becoming Fashionable Again

#1323

Post by Jeffrey »

Reality Check wrote:
Tue Jul 30, 2019 10:04 am
Oh wait, so questioning why an armed police officer shot and killed an unarmed black kid is "mishandling". I think things are becoming clear to me. :roll:

The base of the Republican party is racist. It isn't the fringe.
That's not what I meant by mishandling and I suspect you know it. The DOJ knew two weeks into the investigation there wouldn't be an indictment, they could have calmed things down early on.

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Chilidog
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Re: Racism in America Becoming Fashionable Again

#1324

Post by Chilidog »

President Donald Trump said Tuesday that black legislators planning to boycott his appearance at a Virginia event commemorating the 400th anniversary of the rise of American democracy are going “against their own people.”

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2019/ ... UDVAiVOmEc

Trump's racism hardly makes the news anymore.

Jeffrey
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Re: Racism in America Becoming Fashionable Again

#1325

Post by Jeffrey »

h/t Pitcavage:
A brand new Quinnipiac poll asks a straightforward question: Do you think President Trump is racist?

About half — 51 percent — of all voters say yes, while 45 percent say no.

Some of the breakdowns:

African Americans: 80 percent yes, 11 percent no
Latinos: 55 percent yes, 44 percent no
Whites: 46 percent yes, 50 percent no
Democrats: 86 percent yes, 9 percent no
Independents: 56 percent yes, 38 percent no
Republicans: 8 percent yes, 91 percent no
https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/meet-t ... d_nn_tw_ma

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