James Comey

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RVInit
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Re: James Comey

#276

Post by RVInit »

RoadScholar wrote: Time wounds all heels.
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Dan1100
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Re: James Comey

#277

Post by Dan1100 »

Chilidog wrote:
Notorial Dissent wrote:It is now being reported that Comey is now refusing to testify before the Senate. This just gets better and better.
I suspect that he is waiting for a subpoena to give himself some legal cover.
I think this is it. He's got Comrade Trump threatening him and Executive Privilege issues.

If he is under subpoena, then the burden will be on Trump to try to stop him from testifying by citing Executive Privilege. That is where it might get interesting, if Comey says he wants to obey the subpoena and Trump tries to tell him not to since Comey doesn't work for Trump anymore.

There is a wikipedia article with a history of all the times Executive Privilege has been used.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Executive_privilege

Mike D might have some interesting thoughts.

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Sterngard Friegen
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Re: James Comey

#278

Post by Sterngard Friegen »

Can Trump use executive privilege to keep the former FBI Director from testifying? I'm doubtful.

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Gregg
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Re: James Comey

#279

Post by Gregg »

Sterngard Friegen wrote:Can Trump use executive privilege to keep the former FBI Director from testifying? I'm doubtful.
About certain things. Its at least a grey area, he delayed Yates' appearance.
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Dan1100
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Re: James Comey

#280

Post by Dan1100 »

Sterngard Friegen wrote:Can Trump use executive privilege to keep the former FBI Director from testifying? I'm doubtful.
I'm doubtful too (if Comey wants to testify), but assuming Trump has got something bigly to hide, I think he'll try.

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Re: James Comey

#281

Post by boots »

Not according to Laurence Tribe (as to some things).


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Re: James Comey

#282

Post by Dolly »

Avatar by Tal Peleg Art of Makeup https://www.facebook.com/TalPelegMakeUp

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woodworker
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Re: James Comey

#283

Post by woodworker »

Gregg wrote:Am I alone in thinking that Comey was just a well meaning bungler? I truly believe he struggled with all of his admittedly bad decisions, and paid the price in the court of public opinion for violating what should be any cops prime directive : "Learn to say 'No Comment' and mean it".

I really see him as basically apolitical, he wasn't trying to hurt or help anyone except himself and his own reputation. That's just the way I see it.

I still say the way Trump should have handled it was to wait until the DOJ Inspector General report issued and then ask him for his resignation. Nice, tidy, one day on the headlines and fade to black. Trump's ego and insecurity are the only thing that turned this into the complete dumpster fire it is.
I don't know if you are alone, but you are certainly in a very small number. Comey knew exactly what he was doing last year and I don't buy the political naivete line. No one gets to be director of the FBI, a four star general, etc., without being a political animal.
bring out the tumbrils -- lots of them.

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woodworker
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Re: James Comey

#284

Post by woodworker »

Sterngard Friegen wrote:Can Trump use executive privilege to keep the former FBI Director from testifying? I'm doubtful.
Trump has already discussed publicly what was allegedly said in those meetings. He has waived any privilege.
bring out the tumbrils -- lots of them.

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Re: James Comey

#285

Post by Mikedunford »

Chilidog wrote:
Notorial Dissent wrote:It is now being reported that Comey is now refusing to testify before the Senate. This just gets better and better.
I suspect that he is waiting for a subpoena to give himself some legal cover.
I think it's because he's not the FBI Director anymore, so it would be inappropriate for him to testify about ongoing FBI investigations. I was almost certain he would refuse.
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Re: James Comey

#286

Post by RTH10260 »

for the record, Al Franken the day after the dumping of Comey

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Re: James Comey

#287

Post by Addie »

Thanks, dear Eurobot. I had missed that.
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Re: James Comey

#288

Post by SLQ »

I think it's because he's not the FBI Director anymore, so it would be inappropriate for him to testify about ongoing FBI investigations. I was almost certain he would refuse.
This was a closed session he was invited to. I suspect he either is waiitng for that subpoena or wants to testify publicly (to the extent he is able).
James Comey is willing to speak to Congress following his sudden dismissal as head of the FBI earlier this week, but he wants the testimony to be public, according to a new report.

Comey declined an invitation to speak to the Senate Intelligence Committee in a closed door session next week.
more at the link: http://thehill.com/policy/national-secu ... lic-report
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Re: James Comey

#289

Post by pipistrelle »

SLQ wrote:
I think it's because he's not the FBI Director anymore, so it would be inappropriate for him to testify about ongoing FBI investigations. I was almost certain he would refuse.
This was a closed session he was invited to. I suspect he either is waiitng for that subpoena or wants to testify publicly (to the extent he is able).
James Comey is willing to speak to Congress following his sudden dismissal as head of the FBI earlier this week, but he wants the testimony to be public, according to a new report.

Comey declined an invitation to speak to the Senate Intelligence Committee in a closed door session next week.
more at the link: http://thehill.com/policy/national-secu ... lic-report
Who would be hurt by closed testimony? Him? The public? Just trying to understand the advantages (other than what I think they are).

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Re: James Comey

#290

Post by RoadScholar »

Maybe so the lying liars in the White House can't put words in his mouth about what he said behind doors.
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Re: James Comey

#291

Post by Notorial Dissent »

RoadScholar wrote:Maybe so the lying liars in the White House can't put words in his mouth about what he said behind doors.
That among all the possibilities makes the most sense. I also think he's worried about getting caught in one of his own reality revisions.
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Re: James Comey

#292

Post by listeme »

RoadScholar wrote:Maybe so the lying liars in the White House can't put words in his mouth about what he said behind doors.
I figured this was the reasoning.
We're used to being told it's our fault that men don't listen to us.

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Re: James Comey

#293

Post by pipistrelle »

RoadScholar wrote:Maybe so the lying liars in the White House can't put words in his mouth about what he said behind doors.
:yeah:

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Re: James Comey

#294

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer »

Didn't know where to put this.
http://observer.com/2017/05/lennart-mer ... elections/
TALLINN—Happily, the conference lives on and keeps asking important questions about pressing security issues. This year’s topic, “Darkest Before Dawn?: The War on Trust and How to Win It,” couldn’t be more relevant, coming just a week after Russia’s embarrassingly failed efforts to swing France’s presidential election Moscow’s way. Few cared to note too loudly, at least in open session, that identical Kremlin tricks worked in the United States last November.

:snippity:

Hanging over all the conversations in Tallinn was the knotty issue of President Trump. Numerous experts of all ideological stripes expressed concerns that if—and more likely when—a serious international crisis hits this White House, Trump and his motley crew won’t be up to the task of high-pressure decision-making. While the presence of accomplished security professionals such as Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis and National Security Advisor H. R. McMaster—both top military men of a scholarly bent and balanced demeanor—provides a sense of relief, nobody is quite sure who’s really calling the shots in the West Wing. :snippity:

The ever-growing scandal about Trump and his possible Russia connections throws another wrench into discussions of what foreign policy path the new administration is taking. There was disbelief in Tallinn about how President Trump fired FBI Director James Comey, obviously over the KremlinGate investigation, then mangled his own cover story, then proceeded to publicly threaten Comey with what Russian spies term kompromat. “This is tin-pot dictatorship stuff,” opined a European diplomat who spent considerable time in Washington. “I never thought this could happen in America,” the diplomat added with a frown.

John Schindler is a security expert and former National Security Agency analyst and counterintelligence officer. A specialist in espionage and terrorism, he’s also been a Navy officer and a War College professor. He’s published four books and is on Twitter at @20committee.
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Re: James Comey

#295

Post by Orlylicious »

Skilled opportunist is right. It's fever pitch with the right wing about, as Judge Jeanine directly says, "they should be led out in handcuffs". She told Donald that in the Oval. They've amped these stories to such a point hard to imagine what happens when they fail. Like the second special counsel nonsense. Now we learn Donald had dinner last night at Mar-A-Lago with Sean Hannity. (That sounds like the worst dinner ever! Seb Gorka at their feet getting scraps of meat.) Planning the attack on Comey month? I guess let them knock each other out.

Ready for the media’s Comey swoonfest? Nothing can stop it now.
By Margaret Sullivan Media Columnist March 31 at 8:00 AM
***
Whatever the reason, James B. Comey is about to be the focus of a full-on media swoonfest as the fired FBI director embarks on a 10-city tour to promote his memoir, “A Higher Loyalty: Truth, Lies and Leadership” which publishes April 17.

You have not seen anything like the coming overkill since the mainstream press discovered “Girls” star Lena Dunham. It is going to be embarrassing, if you happen to think media coverage should include a healthy dose of critical distance.“April is officially Comey month,” observed CNN’s Manu Raju. That is probably an understatement.

Tickets with a face price of $95 are going for $850 on StubHub for a Manhattan town hall featuring Comey, according to The Hill. Televised events including a “Late Show With Stephen Colbert” appearance on CBS, a chat with ABCs “The View,” a CNN town hall, interviews with Fox News and MSNBC and much more. Not to mention the live events.

“Comey is the most skilled opportunist ever,” wrote Glenn Greenwald, the Intercept co-founder who frequently points out the untoward love that is being offered in the Trump era to “deep state” figures who were once viewed with great skepticism. Greenwald notes the irony that the former FBI director is “about to get very rich by selling an anti-Trump book even though, according to Nate Silver, Comey is the person most responsible for Trump’s win.”
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Re: James Comey

#296

Post by Lani »

Surprise! Greenwald is right about something.
. Greenwald notes the irony that the former FBI director is “about to get very rich by selling an anti-Trump book even though, according to Nate Silver, Comey is the person most responsible for Trump’s win.”

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Re: James Comey

#297

Post by Sterngard Friegen »

Lani wrote:
Sun Apr 01, 2018 1:26 am
Surprise! Greenwald is right about something.
. Greenwald notes the irony that the former FBI director is “about to get very rich by selling an anti-Trump book even though, according to Nate Silver, Comey is the person most responsible for Trump’s win.”
I'd say it was a tie between Comey and Putin.

Two enemies to American democracy.

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Re: James Comey

#298

Post by p0rtia »

Fuck him and the vainglorious delusions he rode in on. Happy Easter.
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Re: James Comey

#299

Post by Orlylicious »

Comey is doing a CNN Town Hall with Anderson Cooper tonight (5/9) at 8pm EDT. Why? Some are saying he's getting ahead of the Inspector General's next report because it won't look good for him. He's made a few key appearances lately so seems like a good guess. Anyway, with everything going on in the world, having Comey worldwide on CNN in 2.5 hours should make for some entertaining pull quotes and twittering.

Here's an opinion piece in the Hill by Kevin Brock, who is very anti Comey. Including the story to give a view of what the Fox News crowd is expecting. They shouldn't get their hopes up.

James Comey is in trouble and he knows it
By Kevin R. Brock, opinion contributor — 05/07/19 09:30 AM EDT
The views expressed by contributors are their own and not the view of The Hill

James Comey’s planet is getting noticeably warmer. Attorney General William Barr’s emissions are the suspected cause.

Barr has made plain that he intends to examine carefully how and why Comey, as FBI director, decided that the bureau should investigate two presidential campaigns and if, in so doing, any rules or laws were broken.

In light of this, the fired former FBI director apparently has decided that photos of him on Twitter standing amid tall trees and in the middle of empty country roads, acting all metaphysical, is no longer a sufficient strategy.

No, Comey has realized, probably too late, that he has to try to counter, more directly, the narrative being set by the unsparing attorney general whose words in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee last week landed in the Trump-opposition world like holy water on Linda Blair. Shrieking heads haven’t stopped spinning since.

And so we’ve seen Comey get real busy lately. First he penned a curious op-ed in The New York Times. Then a Times reporter, with whom Comey has cooperated in the past, wrote a news article exposing an early, controversial investigative technique against the Trump campaign in an attempt to get out front and excuse it. Next, Comey is scheduled to be encouraged on a friendly cable news “town hall.”

In the op-ed, Comey trotted out his now-familiar St. James schtick, freely pronouncing on the morality of others. He sees himself as a kind of Pontiff-of-the-Potomac working his beads, but comes across more like an unraveling Captain Queeg working his ball bearings.

Comey adjudged the president as “amoral.” He declared the attorney general to be “formidable” but “lacking inner strength” unlike — the inference is clear — Comey himself. A strategy of insulting the executioner right before he swings his ax is an odd one but, then, Comey has a long record of odd decisions and questionable judgment.

“Amoral leaders [referring to the president] have a way of revealing the character of those around them,” wrote Comey without a hint of irony or self-awareness. Those whom the former FBI director assembled around him probably rue the day they ever met the man. Most are now fired or disgraced for appalling behaviors that Comey found easy to manipulate to advance his decisions.

Then, just to make sure his op-ed was odd-salted to the max, Comey mused that the president “eats your soul in small bites.” OK, let’s step back for a moment: James Comey appears to be in trouble. His strange, desperate statements and behaviors betray his nervousness and apprehension. In a way, it’s hard to watch.

Comey will claim that everything he did in the FBI was by the book. But after the investigations by Department of Justice Inspector General Michael Horowitz and U.S. Attorney John Huber, along with Barr’s promised examination, are completed, Comey’s mishandling of the FBI and legal processes likely will be fully exposed.

Ideally, Barr’s examination will aggregate information that addresses three primary streams.

The first will be whether the investigations into both presidential nominees and the Trump campaign were adequately, in Barr’s words, “predicated.” This means he will examine whether there was sufficient justification under existing guidelines for the FBI to have started an investigation in the first place.

The Mueller report’s conclusions make this a fair question for the counterintelligence investigation of the Trump campaign. Comey’s own pronouncement, that the Clinton email case was unprosecutable, makes it a fair question for that investigation.

The second will be whether Comey’s team obeyed long-established investigative guidelines while conducting the investigations and, specifically, if there was sufficient, truthful justification to lawfully conduct electronic surveillance of an American citizen.

The third will be an examination of whether Comey was unduly influenced by political agendas emanating from the previous White House and its director of national intelligence, CIA director and attorney general. This, above all, is what’s causing the 360-degree head spins.

There are early indicators that troubling behaviors may have occurred in all three scenarios. Barr will want to zero in on a particular area of concern: the use by the FBI of confidential human sources, whether its own or those offered up by the then-CIA director.

Without diving into the weeds, it’s important to understand that FBI counterintelligence investigations generally proceed sequentially from what is called a preliminary investigation or inquiry (PI) to a full investigation (FI). To move from a PI to an FI requires substantial information — predication — indicating investigative targets acted as agents of a foreign power.

This is problematic for Comey in light of Mueller’s findings. There are strict guidelines governing when the FBI can task a confidential source or a government undercover operative to collect against a U.S. citizen. Normally this is restricted to a full investigation, and normally restricted to the United States, not overseas.

There is a sense that Comey’s team was not checking the boxes, did not have adequate predication, and may have tasked sources before an investigation was even officially opened. Barr should pull case files and dig in on this.

In addition, the cast of characters leveraged by the FBI against the Trump campaign all appear to have their genesis as CIA sources (“assets,” in agency vernacular) shared at times with the FBI. From Stefan Halper and possibly Joseph Mifsud, to Christopher Steele, to Carter Page himself, and now a mysterious “government investigator” posing as Halper’s assistant and cited in The New York Times article, legitimate questions arise as to whether Comey was manipulated into furthering a CIA political operation more than an FBI counterintelligence case.

Some in the media have suggested that the Times article was an attempt by the FBI to justify its early confidential source actions. But current FBI Director Christopher Wray has shown that he would like to excise the cancerous tumor that grew during Comey’s time and not just keep smoking. It’s hard to imagine current FBI executives trying to justify past malfeasance.

James Comey is right to be apprehensive. He himself ate away at the soul of the FBI, not in small bites but in dangerously large ones. It was a dinner for one, though: His actions are not indicative of the real FBI. The attorney general’s comprehensive examination is welcome and, if done honestly and dispassionately, it will protect future presidential candidates of both parties and redeem the valuable soul of the FBI.

Kevin R. Brock, former assistant director of intelligence for the FBI, was an FBI special agent for 24 years and principal deputy director of the National Counterterrorism Center (NCTC). He is a founder and principal of NewStreet Global Solutions, which consults with private companies and public-safety agencies on strategic mission technologies.
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Re: James Comey

#300

Post by Turtle »

He's on now. They are asking sone good questions. He said he's got no problem with Barr doing a review, and if he does find something, he is good with transparency.

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