Rest in Peace

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Sterngard Friegen
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Re: Rest in Peace

#5276

Post by Sterngard Friegen »

TexasFilly wrote: Mon Feb 24, 2020 4:29 pm
Sterngard Friegen wrote: Mon Feb 24, 2020 4:26 pm Kobe Bryant 's widow filed a wrongful death case today against the helicopter company that provided the equipment and pilot. She filed it on the very death of Bryant's very public funeral, and ceremony at Staples Center (where admission was charged -- classy.) She only has $300,000,000+ in cash, so she needs the money. Maybe she figures if she files first and gets to judgment first she can get all the insurance money and beat out all the other bereaved families whose next of kin Kobe invited along for the ride. And filing it on the day of the funeral means we will never forget.
Who could've predicted the lawsuits?
On the friggin day of the funeral? Did the widow drop them off at the Superior Court on the way to Staples Center? (They're e-filed, so no. But . . .)
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JohnPCapitalist
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Re: Rest in Peace

#5277

Post by JohnPCapitalist »

Sterngard Friegen wrote: Mon Feb 24, 2020 4:26 pm Kobe Bryant 's widow filed a wrongful death case today against the helicopter company that provided the equipment and pilot. She filed it on the very death of Bryant's very public funeral, and ceremony at Staples Center (where admission was charged -- classy.) She only has $300,000,000+ in cash, so she needs the money. Maybe she figures if she files first and gets to judgment first she can get all the insurance money and beat out all the other bereaved families whose next of kin Kobe invited along for the ride. And filing it on the day of the funeral means we will never forget.
There's a good chance this won't work out the way she thinks. I wonder if there will eventually be revealed enough evidence that he overruled the pilot's no-go recommendation that some of the responsibility will come back on him, and that will enable the other families to collect money from Bryant's estate.

News reports talked about how the pilot received a "special VFR" clearance, which is really meaningless. He should have been flying IFR in that fog, which is all but impossible in a helicopter with a single pilot, as they were running that day. The workload is just too much for one person, and it's almost too much for two.
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ZekeB
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Re: Rest in Peace

#5278

Post by ZekeB »

The pilot is in command of his aircraft. He is responsible for the aircraft and all its passengers. He can't be overruled on how to operate his aircraft. If Kobe's estate is worth $300 million as they claim, they won't get a fraction of that from the insurance companies. The only thing this suit will do is put the company out of business.
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Re: Rest in Peace

#5279

Post by AndyinPA »

https://apnews.com/7e58cf76e73aba70736081a06e2715fa
Joe Coulombe envisioned a new generation of young grocery shoppers emerging in the 1960s, one that wanted healthy, tasty, high-quality food they couldn’t find in most supermarkets and couldn’t afford to buy in the few high-end gourmet outlets.

So he found a new way to bring everything from a then-exotic snack food called granola to the California-produced wines that for flavor compared with anything from France. And he made shopping for them almost as much fun as sailing the high seas when he created Trader Joe’s, a quirky little grocery store filled with nautical themes and staffed not by managers and clerks but by “captains and mates.”

From the time he opened his first store in Pasadena, California, in 1967 until his death Friday at age 89, Coulombe watched his namesake business rise from a cult favorite of educated but underpaid young people — and a few hippies — to a retail giant with more than 500 outlets in over 40 states.
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Re: Rest in Peace

#5280

Post by PaulG »

Physicist And Iconoclastic Thinker Freeman Dyson Dies At 96
Polymathematician. Futurist from way back when, when we had a future. Conceived of Dyson Sphere. Another member of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, NJ.
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Sterngard Friegen
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Re: Rest in Peace

#5281

Post by Sterngard Friegen »

AndyinPA wrote: Sat Feb 29, 2020 10:30 am https://apnews.com/7e58cf76e73aba70736081a06e2715fa
Joe Coulombe envisioned a new generation of young grocery shoppers emerging in the 1960s, one that wanted healthy, tasty, high-quality food they couldn’t find in most supermarkets and couldn’t afford to buy in the few high-end gourmet outlets.

So he found a new way to bring everything from a then-exotic snack food called granola to the California-produced wines that for flavor compared with anything from France. And he made shopping for them almost as much fun as sailing the high seas when he created Trader Joe’s, a quirky little grocery store filled with nautical themes and staffed not by managers and clerks but by “captains and mates.”

From the time he opened his first store in Pasadena, California, in 1967 until his death Friday at age 89, Coulombe watched his namesake business rise from a cult favorite of educated but underpaid young people — and a few hippies — to a retail giant with more than 500 outlets in over 40 states.
I wouldn't give him credit for that. California grape growers imported French grapes and eventually transplanted the French fruit stock onto California root stock. After a blight in France in the late 1800s, the French got our grape vines, fruit and root stocks both.

So if French and California wines taste the same it's because the plants are the same. The only variables are climate and weather, and several areas of California are very similar to the French growing regions.
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Notorial Dissent
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Re: Rest in Peace

#5282

Post by Notorial Dissent »

Basically one continent had really good blight resistant root stock the other good vines so they swapped and grafted. Seems to have worked for a couple hundred years give or take. So for the purists out there they are drinking Frankenwine because of the grafting, and you can get two different genetic reports depending on where you pull it from. Salut!!
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Re: Rest in Peace

#5283

Post by Dr. Kenneth Noisewater »

James Lipton lost his cancer battle at age 93
Lipton passed away peacefully Monday morning at his New York City home. His wife, Kedakai Turner, tells TMZ James had been battling bladder cancer. She adds, "There are so many James Lipton stories but I’m sure he would like to be remembered as someone who loved what he did and had tremendous respect for all the people he worked with."

The man had a storied career in and around television and film. Of course, he served as the Dean Emeritus of the Actors Studio Drama School at Pace University in NYC for several years. And, he was responsible for spearheading his famous talk show, "Inside the Actors Studio" -- James interviewed actors, big and small, to pick their brains about the craft.
https://www.tmz.com/2020/03/02/inside-t ... es-age-93/
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Re: Rest in Peace

#5284

Post by Somerset »

AndyinPA wrote: Sat Feb 29, 2020 10:30 am https://apnews.com/7e58cf76e73aba70736081a06e2715fa
Joe Coulombe envisioned a new generation of young grocery shoppers emerging in the 1960s, one that wanted healthy, tasty, high-quality food they couldn’t find in most supermarkets and couldn’t afford to buy in the few high-end gourmet outlets.

So he found a new way to bring everything from a then-exotic snack food called granola to the California-produced wines that for flavor compared with anything from France. And he made shopping for them almost as much fun as sailing the high seas when he created Trader Joe’s, a quirky little grocery store filled with nautical themes and staffed not by managers and clerks but by “captains and mates.”

From the time he opened his first store in Pasadena, California, in 1967 until his death Friday at age 89, Coulombe watched his namesake business rise from a cult favorite of educated but underpaid young people — and a few hippies — to a retail giant with more than 500 outlets in over 40 states.
Trader Joe's quickly became one of Mrs Somerset's favourite places to shop when she moved here from Singapore. And it was one thing I really missed when living in Asia
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Re: Rest in Peace

#5285

Post by Whatever4 »

Jack Welch, former GE CEO, is dead
Jack Welch, who led General Electric through 20 years of its greatest financial success, has died. He was 84.

Welch became CEO of GE in 1981 and led it until his retirement in 2001.

"Today is a sad day for the entire GE family," GE CEO Larry Culp said in a statement. "Jack was larger than life and the heart of GE for half a century. He reshaped the face of our company and the business world. Jack was a strong and constant influence throughout my career despite never having worked directly for him."

Welch, who was named "Manager of the Century" by Fortune magazine in 1999, massively increased the scope and financial might of GE (GE) during his time at the top of the company. The market value of the stock rose from $14 billion to more than $400 billion, an increase of more than 2,700%, during those 20 years.
https://www.cnn.com/2020/03/02/business ... index.html
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Re: Rest in Peace

#5286

Post by kate520 »

James Lipton. :brokenheart:

I watched “Inside...” occasionally, not realizing for a very long time that he was the same James Lipton who wrote An Exaltation of Larks , a book of collective nouns. It’s one of my Top 10 faves.

A pandemonium of parrots
A gulp of cormorants
An intrusion of cockroaches
An embarrassment of pandas


A boogle was not listed, so it wasn’t the definitive text. It was charming, though.
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Re: Rest in Peace

#5287

Post by fierceredpanda »

Max von Sydow, age 90. Death finally won the chess game. :(

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Re: Rest in Peace

#5288

Post by AndyinPA »

RIP. I just saw him in a movie the other day. I remember thinking he looked really old.
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Re: Rest in Peace

#5289

Post by Jez »

I knew who Max von Sydow was as an actor. I also knew him as the voice of Esbern, a character (rather important, too) in Skyrim.

I never have been able to bring myself to kill Paarthunax though, even though he never spoke to me again, in game.
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Re: Rest in Peace

#5290

Post by RVInit »

Al Worden, Apollo 15 astronaut.
“NASA sends its condolences to the family and loved ones of Apollo astronaut Al Worden, an astronaut whose achievements in space and on Earth will not be forgotten.

“A Colonel in the U.S. Air Force, Worden was a test pilot and instructor before joining NASA as an astronaut in 1966. He flew to the Moon as command module pilot aboard Apollo 15. During this time he earned a world record as “most isolated human being" while his crew mates roamed the lunar surface, and he was 2,235 miles away from anyone else.

“Later in his career, Worden became Senior Aerospace Scientist at NASA’s Ames Research Center in California. His multiple appearances on the children’s show Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood surely fueled the desire of many children to pursue careers along the lines of his and become future exploration leaders.

“Of his mission Worden said, ‘Now I know why I'm here. Not for a closer look at the Moon, but to look back at our home, the Earth.’

“We remember this pioneer whose work expanded our horizons.”

For more information about Worden’s NASA career, visit:

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/apollo-15- ... -al-worden
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Re: Rest in Peace

#5291

Post by Sunrise »

Kenny Rogers, 81
M A C A Making America Care Again :daydream:
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Notorial Dissent
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Re: Rest in Peace

#5292

Post by Notorial Dissent »

Lyle Waggoner, 84.
The fact that you sincerely and wholeheartedly believe that the “Law of Gravity” is unconstitutional and a violation of your sovereign rights, does not absolve you of adherence to it.
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Re: Rest in Peace

#5293

Post by Mikedunford »

"I don't give a fuck whether we're peers or not."
--Lord Thomas Henry Bingham to Boris Johnson, on being asked whether he would miss being in "the best club in London" if the Law Lords moved from Parliament to a Supreme Court.
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Re: Rest in Peace

#5294

Post by Chilidog »

I didn't care for Kenny Roger's music, much, but he was an accomplished photographer.

http://sportsandentertainmentnashville. ... tographer/
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Re: Rest in Peace

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Post by kate520 »

His dogs were patients at the vet I worked for, Laurel Pet Hospital. He was a doting doggy dad and very nice to staff.

RIP, Kenny.
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Re: Rest in Peace

#5296

Post by GreatGrey »

Chilidog wrote: Sat Mar 21, 2020 9:17 am I didn't care for Kenny Roger's music, much, but he was an accomplished photographer.

http://sportsandentertainmentnashville. ... tographer/
Music? I thought he was the chicken guy.
I am not "someone upthread".
Trump needs to be smashed into some kind of inedible orange pâté.
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Notorial Dissent
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Re: Rest in Peace

#5297

Post by Notorial Dissent »

GreatGrey wrote: Sat Mar 21, 2020 10:48 am
Chilidog wrote: Sat Mar 21, 2020 9:17 am I didn't care for Kenny Roger's music, much, but he was an accomplished photographer.

http://sportsandentertainmentnashville. ... tographer/
Music? I thought he was the chicken guy.
Yeah, that too.
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Re: Rest in Peace

#5298

Post by Azastan »

kate520 wrote: Sat Mar 21, 2020 10:48 am His dogs were patients at the vet I worked for, Laurel Pet Hospital. He was a doting doggy dad and very nice to staff.

RIP, Kenny.
http://news.4-hhistorypreservation.com/tag/kennyrogers/

He loved his horses, too.
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Re: Rest in Peace

#5299

Post by RTH10260 »

The playwright Terrence McNally dies of complications from the coronavirus.

Terrence McNally, the four-time Tony Award-winning playwright whose outpouring of work for the theater dramatized and domesticated gay life across five decades, died on Tuesday at Sarasota Memorial Hospital in Sarasota, Fla. He was 81.

The cause was complications from the coronavirus, a spokesman, Matt Polk said. He said Mr. McNally had chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, and had overcome lung cancer.



part of https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/24/worl ... -maps.html
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Re: Rest in Peace

#5300

Post by RTH10260 »

Albert Uderzo: Asterix co-creator and illustrator dies aged 92

Albert Uderzo, who drew the Asterix comic books, has died at the age of 92.

He created the famous stories - about the adventures of Gaulish warriors fighting the Roman Empire - with his friend René Goscinny in 1959.

As well as illustrating the series, Urderzo took over the writing following Goscinny's death in 1977.

The books have sold 370 million copies worldwide, in dozens of languages, and several stories have been turned into cartoons and feature films.

The series continues to this day under new ownership, with the most recent book, Asterix and the Chieftain's Daughter, released last October.

"Albert Uderzo died in his sleep at his home in Neuilly, after a heart attack that was not linked to the coronavirus," his son-in-law Bernard de Choisy told the AFP news agency.

https:// www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-52016721
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