New Diseases - Coronavirus

TexasFilly
Posts: 20514
Joined: Mon Sep 28, 2009 12:52 pm

Re: New Diseases - Coronavirus

#4176

Post by TexasFilly »

Whatever4 wrote:
Wed Apr 08, 2020 1:48 pm
In the pictures from Italy, many patients had what looked like diving bell helmets. What are those?
Oxygen. Methodist Hospital in Houston is also beginning to use them, per local news.
I love the poorly educated!!!

Kevin McCarthy: Paul Ryan playing with a head injury -- Jon Lovett

User avatar
Volkonski
Posts: 28872
Joined: Sat Mar 02, 2013 4:44 pm
Location: Texas Gulf Coast and North Fork of Long Island
Occupation: Retired Mechanical Engineer

Re: New Diseases - Coronavirus

#4177

Post by Volkonski »

:o

84 residents evacuated from California nursing home after employees do not show up for work

https://abc13.com/6087051/?ex_cid=TA_KT ... ce=twitter
RIVERSIDE, Calif. -- More than 80 residents were being evacuated from a nursing home in California Wednesday morning after employees "did not show up to care for sick patients two days in a row," health officials said in a statement.

The 84 patients will be moved from Magnolia Rehabilitation and Nursing Center, which has about 90 beds, to other nearby health care locations, a news release from health officials said.

Riverside University Health System and Kaiser Permanente sent 33 licensed vocational nurses and registered nurses to care for the residents after only one of the facility's nursing assistants showed up to work, according to the statement.

There are 34 confirmed cases of the novel coronavirus among the residents and five among employees, officials said.
Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace

User avatar
Volkonski
Posts: 28872
Joined: Sat Mar 02, 2013 4:44 pm
Location: Texas Gulf Coast and North Fork of Long Island
Occupation: Retired Mechanical Engineer

Re: New Diseases - Coronavirus

#4178

Post by Volkonski »

Republican governor noting lack of test supplies.
Chris Sununu
@GovChrisSununu
Earlier this week it was announced that NH has received 15 Abbott rapid-testing devices. While that's good news,
@fema
has only sent us a limited number of the cartridges needed to perform those tests. We have been told to only expect about 15% of the cartridges requested. (1/3)

You can imagine my frustration in being given great tools in our fight to combat #COVID19, but not being provided the resources needed to take advantage of them at even a fraction of their full capacity. What we can use, we will, & we will work to get them deployed quickly. (2/3)

I will continue to put pressure on Washington to provide New Hampshire with the supplies and resources to make full use of the Abbott rapid-testing devices - supplies that only they can provide - so that we can continue our efforts to prevent the spread of #COVID19. (3/3)
Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace

User avatar
Kendra
Posts: 16738
Joined: Fri Aug 05, 2016 7:53 am

Re: New Diseases - Coronavirus

#4179

Post by Kendra »

MSNBC shows U.S. Death count at 14,000 +. :crying:

User avatar
Bill_G
Posts: 1571
Joined: Thu Mar 22, 2018 9:10 am
Location: Portland OR
Occupation: I work at being pleasantly surprised everyday.

Re: New Diseases - Coronavirus

#4180

Post by Bill_G »

Winning!

So much winning.

User avatar
pipistrelle
Posts: 8788
Joined: Wed Oct 19, 2016 11:26 am

Re: New Diseases - Coronavirus

#4181

Post by pipistrelle »

Just noticed 1point3acres is now showing military separately.
6ABFD46B-C44B-4739-AA7B-5FC82C82E7F5.jpeg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

User avatar
tek
Posts: 4458
Joined: Fri Nov 16, 2012 6:02 pm
Location: Lake Humidity, FL
Occupation: Damned if I know

Re: New Diseases - Coronavirus

#4182

Post by tek »

Volkonski wrote:
Wed Apr 08, 2020 3:30 pm
Republican governor noting lack of test supplies.
Chris Sununu
@GovChrisSununu
Earlier this week it was announced that NH has received 15 Abbott rapid-testing devices. While that's good news,
@fema
has only sent us a limited number of the cartridges needed to perform those tests. We have been told to only expect about 15% of the cartridges requested. (1/3)

You can imagine my frustration in being given great tools in our fight to combat #COVID19, but not being provided the resources needed to take advantage of them at even a fraction of their full capacity. What we can use, we will, & we will work to get them deployed quickly. (2/3)

I will continue to put pressure on Washington to provide New Hampshire with the supplies and resources to make full use of the Abbott rapid-testing devices - supplies that only they can provide - so that we can continue our efforts to prevent the spread of #COVID19. (3/3)
Chris Sununu is one of Trump's best buds. Trump is counting on NH in the general election. Yet they too have to scrap for supplies.

Oh, and, Chris Sununu can go copulate himself with a rusty chainsaw.
There's no way back
from there to here

User avatar
RTH10260
Posts: 26607
Joined: Tue Mar 02, 2010 8:52 am
Location: Near the Swiss Alps

Re: New Diseases - Coronavirus

#4183

Post by RTH10260 »

Not Just Ventilators: Staff Trained to Run Them Are in Short Supply
Each patient on a breathing machine requires multiple doctors and nurses to care for that person

By Karen Weintraub on April 8, 2020

Governor Andrew Cuomo has warned that New York State is running out of time to get enough ventilators to treat the sickest coronavirus patients. Without them, vastly more New Yorkers could die. But the number of ventilators is not the only bottleneck: hospitals around the country are worried that a surge in COVID-19 patients will catch them short of the staff needed to run the lifesaving machines.

In a typical hospital intensive care unit, one nurse takes care of one or two patients at a time, says Ali Raja, a physician and executive vice chair of emergency medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital. Before an individual is put on a ventilator, an anesthesiologist or emergency room doctor must intubate, or feed a tube down the throat of, that person. Such patients need to be anesthetized and immobilized during this process to avoid feeling like they are choking, Raja says. Then there are the respiratory therapists—roughly one for every 10 patients—needed to set up the ventilators and routinely check in on the machines, responding if there are any alarms or malfunctions. In addition, a critical care doctor must check in on each patient twice a day. There is also the worry that the health care workers themselves will become sick with the virus.


https://www.scientificamerican.com/arti ... rt-supply/

User avatar
Volkonski
Posts: 28872
Joined: Sat Mar 02, 2013 4:44 pm
Location: Texas Gulf Coast and North Fork of Long Island
Occupation: Retired Mechanical Engineer

Re: New Diseases - Coronavirus

#4184

Post by Volkonski »

Coronavirus Was Slow to Spread to Rural America. Not Anymore.

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/202 ... tw-nytimes
Now it has. A new wave of coronavirus cases is spreading deep into rural corners of the country where people once hoped their communities might be shielded because of their isolation from hard-hit urban centers and the natural social distancing of life in the countryside.

The coronavirus has officially reached more than two-thirds of the country’s rural counties, with one in 10 reporting at least one death. Doctors and elected officials are warning that a late-arriving wave of illness could overwhelm rural communities that are older, poorer and sicker than much of the country, and already dangerously short on medical help.

:snippity:

With 42 states now urging people to stay at home, the last holdouts are the Republican governors of North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Iowa and Arkansas. Gov. Kristi Noem of South Dakota has suggested that the stricter measures violated personal liberties, and she said her state’s rural character made it better positioned to handle the outbreak.

:snippity:

“We’re behind the curve in rural America,” said Senator Jon Tester, Democrat of Montana, who said his state needs hundreds of thousands of masks, visors and gowns. “If they don’t have the protective equipment and somebody goes down and gets sick, that could close the hospital.”
Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace

User avatar
ZekeB
Posts: 17095
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2009 10:07 pm
Location: Northwest part of Semi Blue State

Re: New Diseases - Coronavirus

#4185

Post by ZekeB »

Allegedly: Iowa and Nebraska's governors claim to have spoken with Fauci, who agreed that they were taking adequate protective measures. Just looking around within a mile of my place it's obvious that the measures go nowhere near accomplishing what a stay at home declaration would.
Trump: Er hat eine größere Ente als ich.

Putin: Du bist kleiner als ich.

User avatar
Volkonski
Posts: 28872
Joined: Sat Mar 02, 2013 4:44 pm
Location: Texas Gulf Coast and North Fork of Long Island
Occupation: Retired Mechanical Engineer

Re: New Diseases - Coronavirus

#4186

Post by Volkonski »

'Cardiac calls' to 911 in New York City surge, and they may really be more COVID cases
Fire Department data show ambulances are responding to a surge in fatal or near-fatal heart attacks suffered by New Yorkers whose true health issue may be COVID-19.


https://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-n ... y-n1179286
Since the beginning of the coronavirus outbreak, residents of hard-hit New York City have been talking about ambulance sirens and how the wailing never seems to stop.

They're not imagining things — but the reality is even grimmer than some may have guessed. A huge number of those ambulances are responding to fatal or near-fatal heart attacks suffered by New Yorkers whose true health issue may be COVID-19, the disease associated with the coronavirus.

Emergency Medical Services, the part of the fire department that runs the city's paramedic response, is responding to three or four times its average daily number of cardiac calls, with each call almost twice as likely to involve a death.

According to the Fire Department of New York, or FDNY, it means more patients are calling 911 closer to death, and many more of them are dying despite the best efforts of EMTs and paramedics before they ever reach a hospital.
Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace

User avatar
MN-Skeptic
Posts: 3460
Joined: Wed Jan 25, 2012 6:36 pm
Location: Twin Cities

Re: New Diseases - Coronavirus

#4187

Post by MN-Skeptic »

Volkonski wrote:
Wed Apr 08, 2020 6:40 pm
Coronavirus Was Slow to Spread to Rural America. Not Anymore.
It's like they believe that their residents never go to the Big City or travel out of the country. And yet my nephew and his wife in rural Iowa went to Jamaica just a month ago. They did self-quarantine for two weeks after they got back. And my niece got married in Jamaica about 10 years ago. There were something like 20 friends and relatives who flew down there for the wedding.

Travel happens. Even from and to rural counties.
MAGA - Morons Are Governing America

User avatar
Sam the Centipede
Posts: 7751
Joined: Thu Aug 30, 2012 3:25 pm

Re: New Diseases - Coronavirus

#4188

Post by Sam the Centipede »

The information coming out about the nature of the respiratory failure in Covid-19 is worrying (see articles linked above by Danraft and others). I think these are the key points:
  • Covid-19 can lead to very low blood oxygen levels which usually (for non-Covid-19 conditions) indicate a need for mechanical ventilation, but this might be misleading for Covid-19
  • patients might not show the other expected signs of respiratory failure, e.g. distress, confusion, perhaps because blood carbon dioxide levels are not elevated, so the lungs are still doing that part of their job (hence the noted superficial similarity to altitude sickness)
  • lungs do not show the same patterns of damage as in many types of respiratory failure
  • mechanical ventilation perhaps could make things worse
  • for elderly patients, mechanical ventilation has inherent dangers, especially as long periods of sedation (needed when a tube is down the throat) can cause cognitive damage
  • patients on simpler non-invasive support, such as extra oxygen by nasal cannula (the little plastic gadget below the nostrils, a staple of tv medical dramas) or CPAP often do well
  • ventilators need nurses and doctors with appropriate training and experience, but these cannot be magically produced (non-invasive breathing support is much less demanding of resources)
I'm thinking that if I find myself in a hospital with this disease, I might stipulate "do not ventilate". I don't want to die but equally I don't have a desire to spend the remainder of my life with broken brain or broken lungs.

I'm sure others will correct my mistakes or misinterpretations – I am not a medic.

User avatar
MN-Skeptic
Posts: 3460
Joined: Wed Jan 25, 2012 6:36 pm
Location: Twin Cities

Re: New Diseases - Coronavirus

#4189

Post by MN-Skeptic »

My brother is a 59-year old psychiatrist in a Minnesota city of about 26K. I don't know what will happen when coronavirus comes there, but my brother has said "You don't want me intubating anyone." Hopefully they can keep more people alive without ventilators, but this is an evolving situation.
MAGA - Morons Are Governing America

TexasFilly
Posts: 20514
Joined: Mon Sep 28, 2009 12:52 pm

Re: New Diseases - Coronavirus

#4190

Post by TexasFilly »

I love the poorly educated!!!

Kevin McCarthy: Paul Ryan playing with a head injury -- Jon Lovett

TexasFilly
Posts: 20514
Joined: Mon Sep 28, 2009 12:52 pm

Re: New Diseases - Coronavirus

#4191

Post by TexasFilly »

Hey, this is just me, but I prefer to make medical decisions based on consultations with actual medical doctors. Speculation about stuff people read on the internet is interesting but I'm sure as hell not going to issue any do not ventilate orders based on amateur sleuthing.
I love the poorly educated!!!

Kevin McCarthy: Paul Ryan playing with a head injury -- Jon Lovett

User avatar
RTH10260
Posts: 26607
Joined: Tue Mar 02, 2010 8:52 am
Location: Near the Swiss Alps

Re: New Diseases - Coronavirus

#4192

Post by RTH10260 »

No longer the Chinese Virus - now it's the European Virus (or the Italian, Spanish, ...)
Coronavirus in New York came mainly from Europe, studies show.

New research indicates that the coronavirus began to circulate in the New York area by mid-February, weeks before the first confirmed case, and that it was brought to the region mainly by travelers from Europe, not Asia.

“The majority is clearly European,” said Harm van Bakel, a geneticist at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, who co-wrote a study awaiting peer review.

A separate team at N.Y.U. Grossman School of Medicine came to strikingly similar conclusions, despite studying a different group of cases. Both teams analyzed genomes from coronaviruses taken from New Yorkers starting in mid-March.

The research revealed a previously hidden spread of the virus that might have been detected if aggressive testing programs had been put in place. On Jan. 31, President Trump barred foreign nationals from entering the country if they had been in China — the site of the virus’s first known outbreak — during the previous two weeks.


part of https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/08/us/c ... k-1316a5b0

TexasFilly
Posts: 20514
Joined: Mon Sep 28, 2009 12:52 pm

Re: New Diseases - Coronavirus

#4193

Post by TexasFilly »

Just when you thought Moldy Modly had gone away:
Trip to Guam at center of top Navy official’s resignation cost taxpayers over $243,000

Acting Navy secretary Thomas Modly boarded one of his service’s executive jets Monday to visit Guam — a trip that turned out to be costly for both him and U.S. taxpayers.

For Modly, the visit resulted in his resignation, after he created an uproar by insulting the former commanding officer of the USS Theodore Roosevelt, who had raised concerns about how the Navy was handling a coronavirus outbreak on the warship.
For taxpayers, the cost of the flight alone was at least $243,151.65, according to a Navy estimate.

The figure was based on 35 hours of flight time to and from Guam, with refueling in Hawaii. Modly traveled on a C-37B at a cost of about $6,946.19 per hour, according to the estimate, which was obtained by The Washington Post. The jet is a military version of the Gulfstream G550.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/national ... st-243000/

I think he should re-imburse the taxpayers.
I love the poorly educated!!!

Kevin McCarthy: Paul Ryan playing with a head injury -- Jon Lovett

User avatar
MN-Skeptic
Posts: 3460
Joined: Wed Jan 25, 2012 6:36 pm
Location: Twin Cities

Re: New Diseases - Coronavirus

#4194

Post by MN-Skeptic »

TexasFilly wrote:
Wed Apr 08, 2020 11:44 pm
Hey, this is just me, but I prefer to make medical decisions based on consultations with actual medical doctors. Speculation about stuff people read on the internet is interesting but I'm sure as hell not going to issue any do not ventilate orders based on amateur sleuthing.
I posted a link to that article on Facebook and my sister (PhD in physiology) wrote a reply. She had listened to a podcast for ER doctors and they were interviewing an ER doctor from New York City. He was explaining that they had found that they could put patients on nasal cannulas on high flow and buy them a day or two before they needed a ventilator. The main point was to delay the use of ventilators which were in short supply. Unfortunately, once the patients are sick enough to need a ventilator, the prognosis isn’t good.
MAGA - Morons Are Governing America

User avatar
Sam the Centipede
Posts: 7751
Joined: Thu Aug 30, 2012 3:25 pm

Re: New Diseases - Coronavirus

#4195

Post by Sam the Centipede »

MN-Skeptic wrote:
Thu Apr 09, 2020 1:32 am
The main point was to delay the use of ventilators which were in short supply. Unfortunately, once the patients are sick enough to need a ventilator, the prognosis isn’t good.
I hope this conclusion is being applied by decision makers, both political and medical. Ventilators have become totemic in this campaign against the disease, but their value might be illusory. The really important aim must be to keep people off ventilators, preferably by them remaining uninfected, otherwise by using non-invasive respiratory support.

I am reminded of how CPR always occupies a large part of any first aid course despite most first aid issues requiring much simpler care and – critically – CPR is almost always unsuccessful. In the context of DNR and DNACPR instructions one doctor's explanation was that this wasn't killing patients or condemning them to death; rather, the patient had already died but resuscitation might just bring them back from the dead. A similar situation seems to apply with ventilation.

In television dramas, such as ER (remember Dr. Benton kneeling on a moving gurney beating the bejaysus out of a patient in the opening titles?), CPR is a staple because it creates great dramatic scenes, but this over-use has the downside of misleading viewers as to its success. The same seems to be happening with ventilators, but via news and comment rather than via fiction.

Just to be clear: I am not advocating abandoning CPR training!

User avatar
RTH10260
Posts: 26607
Joined: Tue Mar 02, 2010 8:52 am
Location: Near the Swiss Alps

Re: New Diseases - Coronavirus

#4196

Post by RTH10260 »

TexasFilly wrote:
Thu Apr 09, 2020 12:34 am
Just when you thought Moldy Modly had gone away:
Trip to Guam at center of top Navy official’s resignation cost taxpayers over $243,000
:snippity:
https://www.washingtonpost.com/national ... st-243000/

I think he should re-imburse the taxpayers.
Does the Navy serve champagne and multiple meals to chose from to their first class passengers on long haul :?:

User avatar
Sugar Magnolia
Posts: 11403
Joined: Sun Apr 01, 2012 6:44 am

Re: New Diseases - Coronavirus

#4197

Post by Sugar Magnolia »

Sam the Centipede wrote:
Wed Apr 08, 2020 9:41 pm
The information coming out about the nature of the respiratory failure in Covid-19 is worrying (see articles linked above by Danraft and others). I think these are the key points:
  • Covid-19 can lead to very low blood oxygen levels which usually (for non-Covid-19 conditions) indicate a need for mechanical ventilation, but this might be misleading for Covid-19
  • patients might not show the other expected signs of respiratory failure, e.g. distress, confusion, perhaps because blood carbon dioxide levels are not elevated, so the lungs are still doing that part of their job (hence the noted superficial similarity to altitude sickness)
  • lungs do not show the same patterns of damage as in many types of respiratory failure
  • mechanical ventilation perhaps could make things worse
  • for elderly patients, mechanical ventilation has inherent dangers, especially as long periods of sedation (needed when a tube is down the throat) can cause cognitive damage
  • patients on simpler non-invasive support, such as extra oxygen by nasal cannula (the little plastic gadget below the nostrils, a staple of tv medical dramas) or CPAP often do well
  • ventilators need nurses and doctors with appropriate training and experience, but these cannot be magically produced (non-invasive breathing support is much less demanding of resources)
I'm thinking that if I find myself in a hospital with this disease, I might stipulate "do not ventilate". I don't want to die but equally I don't have a desire to spend the remainder of my life with broken brain or broken lungs.

I'm sure others will correct my mistakes or misinterpretations – I am not a medic.
Do not tell them not to ventilate or they can't use anything. Tell them do not intubate, which is necessary to be put on a ventilator.

User avatar
Sugar Magnolia
Posts: 11403
Joined: Sun Apr 01, 2012 6:44 am

Re: New Diseases - Coronavirus

#4198

Post by Sugar Magnolia »

Sam the Centipede wrote:
Thu Apr 09, 2020 4:17 am
I am reminded of how CPR always occupies a large part of any first aid course despite most first aid issues requiring much simpler care and – critically – CPR is almost always unsuccessful.
The CDC doesn't agree with you.
1. CPR Saves Lives.

Currently, about 9 in 10 people who have cardiac arrest outside the hospital die. But CPR can help improve those odds. If it is performed in the first few minutes of cardiac arrest, CPR can double or triple a person’s chance of survival.

Certain people, including people in low-income, black, and Hispanic neighborhoods, are less likely to receive CPR from bystanders than people in high-income, white neighborhoods. Women may also be less likely to receive CPR if they experience cardiac arrest in a public place.
https://www.cdc.gov/features/learn-cpr/index.html

User avatar
Indigo
Posts: 134
Joined: Sun Apr 28, 2019 2:21 am
Location: Where the Sewer Meets the Sea

Re: New Diseases - Coronavirus

#4199

Post by Indigo »

Sam the Centipede wrote:
Thu Apr 09, 2020 4:17 am
MN-Skeptic wrote:
Thu Apr 09, 2020 1:32 am
The main point was to delay the use of ventilators which were in short supply. Unfortunately, once the patients are sick enough to need a ventilator, the prognosis isn’t good.
I hope this conclusion is being applied by decision makers, both political and medical. Ventilators have become totemic in this campaign against the disease, but their value might be illusory. The really important aim must be to keep people off ventilators, preferably by them remaining uninfected, otherwise by using non-invasive respiratory support.
The value of ventilators are not illusory to those patients that are being saved by them. And understanding shortages and challenges related to vent use has value, especially for family members of those patients hospitalized that end up being placed on them. Family members that are forbidden to even visit their loved ones.

A few years ago I was in an ICU, in a drug induced coma and on a ventilator for over three weeks. In my case, nothing less invasive than a vent would have worked because I was too far gone. Vents are not a Covid-19 panacea by any means. And I think most intelligent people understand that. But vents are vital given complications like severe pneumonia that I understand afflict numerous Covid-19 patients, and severe pneumonia was what I had that required a vent.

When a vent is necessary, it is necessary. And nothing else can replace it. Perhaps that is one of the reasons why so much attention is being devoted to them.
Sam the Centipede wrote:
Wed Apr 08, 2020 9:41 pm
I'm thinking that if I find myself in a hospital with this disease, I might stipulate "do not ventilate". I don't want to die but equally I don't have a desire to spend the remainder of my life with broken brain or broken lungs.
While I was on a vent my family was asked to consider authorizing them to remove me from life support as I was not expected to survive perhaps beyond a permanent vegetative state. I had (among other things) severe brain damage due to O2 interruption/loss while in the hospital, and I had already died (I'm not kidding) and been resuscitated once. My family declined consent for life support to be removed.

And I suffered horrendously when I was finally allowed to regain consciousness. I suffered for what seemed an eternity in ways that are beyond description, both physically and mentally. I had no understanding of what had happened to me at all. I could not comprehend much of anything and could not even speak, having lost that ability. At times I longed for death (when I could even form that much of a thought) as a release from the situation I found myself in. All that was followed by even more time in a regular hospital room after the ICU and at last, a lengthy in-patient rehab (that also brought on struggle and exhaustion). To re-learn how think and to do everything all over again and regain a semblance of strength. When I finally left the hospital months later I looked like a Nazi concentration camp survivor.

But I can say now that I am glad to be alive. Glad to have survived. My perspective on life no longer being entirely shaped by that awful suffering. And it still shocks me to understand that I made it through all of that and lived. Because I am unremarkable. Nothing special at all.

So be careful when considering what course to choose when it comes to instructions given to medical staff in advance of the outcome. You might do better than you think you will if given the chance; in the end I managed to escape nearly unscathed even after all I had been through. And had another chance at life.
"I know the human being and fish can coexist peacefully." --President George W. Bush

User avatar
Volkonski
Posts: 28872
Joined: Sat Mar 02, 2013 4:44 pm
Location: Texas Gulf Coast and North Fork of Long Island
Occupation: Retired Mechanical Engineer

Re: New Diseases - Coronavirus

#4200

Post by Volkonski »

Greater Houston-

Missouri City nursing home reports 28 COVID-19 cases

https://www.chron.com/neighborhood/suga ... 188478.php
A Missouri City nursing home confirmed 28 residents and staff members tested positive for COVID-19 Wednesday. Officials from Park Manor Quail Valley say they requested facility-wide testing from local health authorities after a resident tested positive March 30.

“Due to the lack of availability of test kits, we were turned down,” Derek Prince, President and CEO of HMG Healthcare, LLC said in an emailed statement. “The facility was able to purchase test kits from a private contractor on Tuesday, April 7th, and all patients and clinical staff were tested.”

Tests results showed a total of 16 residents and 12 staff members were COVID-19 positive. Park Manor Quail Valley is the first of Fort Bend County’s nursing homes to report staff or resident who have tested positive for COVID-19. However, the Richmond State-Supported Living which has roughly 320 residents and over 1,300 full-time employees, became the focus of an investigation by the Fort Bend County Health and Human Services after two residents there tested positive on March 30. County officials have so far not released any additional information about the Richmond facility, which is the second largest of the state’s 13 residential facilities for individuals with intellectual and physical disabilities.

The Denton State-Supported Living Center, the largest of the 13 facilities, has approximately 90 residents and staff members who have tested positive in recent weeks. Of Park Manor Quail Valley residents, ten are in the hospital and six are being treated at the facility. All 12 team members are recovering at home.
Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace

Post Reply

Return to “Coronavirus”