EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler

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RTH10260
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EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler

#1

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EPA Head Targets “Worst-Case” Climate Scenarios
Administrator Wheeler has called such projections unrealistic, but experts say they are most in line with current emissions trends

By Jean Chemnick, E&E News on June 10, 2019

EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler says the use of an inappropriately pessimistic climate modeling tool is driving bad press around climate change, and he’s pledged to halt its use.

While he was still acting EPA chief, Wheeler blamed overly dire assumptions for the National Climate Assessment, released by the Trump administration last Black Friday—a launch that seemed calculated to bury the congressionally mandated report, which highlighted the findings of experts at 13 federal agencies that harmful man-made climate change is underway and growing worse.

And Wheeler used a summit last month in Metz, France, with ministers from six principal foreign allies to promise to “reexamine comprehensive modeling that best reflects the actual state of climate science.”

Then, last Monday at a National Press Club briefing, Wheeler lamented that most press coverage of the NCA focused on what he called “the worst-case scenario.”

“I do think we should take a more realistic look at the worst-case scenarios ... all the scenarios ... going forward,” he said.


https://www.scientificamerican.com/arti ... scenarios/

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RTH10260
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Re: EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler

#2

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crossposting
E.P.A. Opts Against Limits on Water Contaminant Tied to Fetal Damage
A new E.P.A. policy on perchlorate, which is used in rocket fuel, would revoke a 2011 finding that the chemical should be regulated.

Lisa Friedman
May 14, 2020, 12:13 p.m. ET

WASHINGTON — The Trump administration will not impose any limits on perchlorate, a toxic chemical compound that contaminates water and has been linked to fetal and infant brain damage, according to two Environmental Protection Agency staff members familiar with the decision.

The decision by Andrew Wheeler, the administrator of the E.P.A., appears to defy a court order that required the agency to establish a safe drinking-water standard for the chemical by the end of June. The policy, which acknowledges that exposure to high levels of perchlorate can cause I.Q. damage but opts nevertheless not to limit it, could also set a precedent for the regulation of other chemicals, people familiar with the matter said.

The chemical — which is used in rocket fuel, among other applications — has been under study for more than a decade, but because contamination is widespread, regulations have been difficult.

In 2011, the Obama administration announced that it planned to regulate perchlorate for the first time, reversing a decision by the George W. Bush administration not to control it. But the Defense Department and military contractors such as Lockheed Martin and Northrop Grumman have waged aggressive efforts to block controls, and the fight has dragged on.

According to the staff members, who asked not to be identified because they were not authorized to speak about agency decisions, the E.P.A. intends in the coming days to send a federal register notice to the White House for review that will declare it is “not in the public interest” to regulate the chemical.


https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/14/clim ... orate.html

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RTH10260
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Re: EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler

#3

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E.P.A. Limits States’ Power to Oppose Pipelines and Other Energy Projects
The agency tweaked the rules on how to apply the Clean Water Act, which New York and other states have used to fight fossil-fuel ventures.

By Lisa Friedman
June 1, 2020
Updated 4:49 p.m. ET

WASHINGTON — The Environmental Protection Agency on Monday announced that it had limited states’ ability to block the construction of energy infrastructure projects, part of the Trump administration’s goal of promoting gas pipelines, coal terminals and other fossil fuel development.

The completed rule curtails sections of the U.S. Clean Water Act that New York has used to block an interstate gas pipeline, and Washington employed to oppose a coal export terminal. The move is expected to set up a legal clash with Democratic governors who have sought to block fossil fuel projects.

Specifically, it limits to one year the amount of time states and tribes can take to review a project and restricts states to taking water quality only into consideration when judging permits. The Trump administration has accused some states of blocking projects for reasons that go beyond clean water considerations, such as climate change impacts.

Andrew Wheeler, the administrator of the E.P.A., said the agency was moving to “curb abuses of the Clean Water Act that have held our nation’s energy infrastructure projects hostage, and to put in place clear guidelines that finally give these projects a path forward.” States, he said, would no longer be allowed to use the law to object to projects “under the auspices of climate change.”


https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/01/clim ... lines.html

TexasFilly
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Re: EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler

#4

Post by TexasFilly »

That will go over well in Michigan. Folks are pretty adamant about saving the Great Lakes. Even most of the RWNJs understand that keeping their fishing waters clean is of paramount import.
I love the poorly educated!!!

Kevin McCarthy: Paul Ryan playing with a head injury -- Jon Lovett

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RTH10260
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Re: EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler

#5

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Trump Waives Environmental Reviews, Vulnerable Communities Could Bear the Brunt
Such reviews are intended to allow community input and minimize harm to the environment

By Adam Aton, Scott Waldman, E&E News on June 5, 2020
Trump Waives Environmental Reviews, Vulnerable Communities Could Bear the Brunt
President Donald Trump speaks during a news conference in the Rose Garden at the White House June 05, 2020 in Washington, DC. Credit: Chip Somodevilla Getty Images
Communities of color will have fewer ways to protect themselves from pollution and climate change under President Trump's decision to curtail environmental reviews for infrastructure projects.

Citing an economic emergency associated with the coronavirus, Trump yesterday signed an executive order waiving reviews required under the National Environmental Policy Act.

The law is often used by the public to shape federal decisions related to infrastructure; it requires agencies to analyze alternatives that could minimize harm to the environment and allows the public to comment. Trump's order also seeks to circumvent the Endangered Species Act.

The president directed federal agencies to use emergency powers and "other authorities" to accelerate infrastructure development, according to a senior administration official, and "expedite construction of highways and other projects designed for environmental, energy, transportation, natural resource, and other uses."

Little to no precedent exists for the administration's action, experts and advocates said, adding that such a waiver would hurt communities of color disproportionately because of ingrained economic insecurity and existing pollution.


https://www.scientificamerican.com/arti ... the-brunt/

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Chilidog
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Re: EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler

#6

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It's all about the fast buck with Trump.

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Re: EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler

#7

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Was also prior administrations failure, but nice to push this on individual-1
EPA faces lawsuit alleging failure to update flaring requirements
BY RACHEL FRAZIN - 06/11/20 02:43 PM EDT

A coalition of environmental groups taking legal action against the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) over the agency’s alleged failure to update requirements for an industrial process for burning pollutants.

The groups alleged in a notice of intent to sue that the EPA has not updated its requirements for the process, called flaring, since 1986 despite a requirement to do so every eight years.

Flaring is a process used in industries such as the oil and gas industry as well as the petrochemical industry in which companies attempt to burn waste gases, which can include some that can harm health and the environment.

“The problem is that the current standards for flares are very outdated, they’re 34 years old at this point and they don’t look at certain things that are really necessary to make sure flares are operating properly,” Adam Kron, a lawyer on the case, told The Hill, adding that he would like to see improved monitoring requirements.

Data from around the time that the 1986 flaring rule was put forth indicated that flares destroyed about 98 percent of pollutants. More recently, however, the agency found that ethylene flares only destroy about 90.4 percent.


https://thehill.com/policy/energy-envir ... quirements

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Re: EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler

#8

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Strongest Evidence Yet Shows Air Pollution Kills
The finding comes as the Trump administration has been rolling back clean air regulations

By Susan Cosier on July 29, 2020

As California’s Camp Fire raged in 2018, soot and other pollution filled the skies. Particulate matter concentrations widely surged above 12 micrograms per cubic meter (µg/m3), pushing them into the Environmental Protection Agency’s “unhealthy” range. And in some places, they jumped to hundreds of µg/m3.

This miasma included particles 2.5 microns in diameter or smaller, known as PM2.5, which also spew from tailpipes and smokestacks as cars burn gas and power plants combust coal. Their minuscule size lets them travel deep into the lungs, causing short-term breathing problems. Thousands of previous studies show such particles can also exacerbate asthma in the long term and contribute to cardiovascular problems, low birth weight and other issues. There is widespread medical consensus on this association, but some members of an EPA committee overhauled by a Trump administration appointee, along with oil and gas industry consultants, claim the studies did not show direct causality. Harvard University biostatistician Francesca Dominici and her colleagues address such assertions in a study published in July in Science Advances. They say their investigation shows the most comprehensive link between air pollution and premature deaths yet.


https://www.scientificamerican.com/arti ... ion-kills/

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