Issues 2020: Medicare for All/Public Option

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Issues 2020: Medicare for All/Public Option

#1

Post by Addie » Sun Mar 10, 2019 9:55 am

CNBC
‘Medicare-for-all’ vs. the public option: How health care could shape the Democratic primary race to take on Trump in the 2020 election

As the Democratic primary season kicks off, several candidates are embracing a “Medicare-for-all” health insurance plan to cover every American.

Others who want to take a more incremental approach back a system where Americans can buy into Medicare or Medicaid.

The debate shows just how much the Democratic Party has shifted on health care in recent years.

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Re: Issues 2020: Medicare for All/Public Option

#2

Post by Addie » Sat Mar 16, 2019 9:23 am

National Memo
Poll: Huge Majorities Reject Trump's Medicare And Medicaid Cuts

New national polling from Public Policy Polling conducted for the organization Protect Our Care shows overwhelming voter rejection of the cuts to Medicare and Medicaid in the budget the Trump administration released this week, once more elevating health care to a key issue for the 2020 campaign, and creating a major headache for Republicans.

The survey found that 60 percent of voters are opposed to Trump’s proposed Medicaid cuts; 72 percent say they oppose the proposed Medicare cuts; and 50 percent say they’re less likely to vote for him because of these proposed cuts. That includes 54 percent who consider themselves independents. When the question about Trump’s proposed budget cuts was prefaced by the statement “President Trump is proposing these cuts to Medicare and Medicaid after his tax plan gave hundreds of billions of dollars in new tax breaks for big corporations, including health insurance companies and drug companies,” the number that say they are less likely to support him jumps to 54 percent. That includes 57 percent of voters over age 65 and 51 percent of independents.

The proposed budget would cut $780 billion from Medicaid over the next 10 years and reduce the growth of the program by $1.4 trillion. It would cut $846 billion from Medicare. The administration argues it’s just cutting waste, fraud, and abuse in Medicare (it doesn’t bother to justify destroying Medicaid), ignoring the fact that cuts that deep to providers in Medicare will rebound onto patients.

White House budgets are never binding, but they’re a reflection of the values and priorities of the president. Boy, is this budget a reflection of Trump—one that Democrats are going to hang around the neck of every Republican between now and November 3, 2020.

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Re: Issues 2020: Medicare for All/Public Option

#3

Post by Addie » Mon Mar 18, 2019 8:34 pm

Vox
Medicare for America, Beto O’Rourke’s favorite health care plan, explained ...

In brief, here’s what the bill authored by DeLauro and Schakowsky and now embraced by O’Rourke would do:
The uninsured, people currently purchasing insurance in the Obamacare marketplaces, Medicaid beneficiaries, and newborns would automatically be enrolled into an improved Medicare program, which would continue to cover seniors as well.

Employers could continue to offer private insurance, so long as it meets certain federal standards. Companies could also elect to send their workers to the public program and pay a contribution toward their employees’ costs. Likewise, workers could voluntarily leave their job’s insurance for the new public plan.

Participants would be required to pay premiums, on a sliding scale based on their income; people with lower incomes would pay no premium at all. Out-of-pocket costs would also be based on income and capped at $3,500 for an individual or $5,000 for a family.

Doctors would be paid Medicare rates, with an additional increase provided for primary care doctors and mental health services.
The plan is intentionally written to avoid disrupting employer-sponsored insurance for people who currently get coverage through their work. Companies could continue to offer private insurance to their employees as long as it covers at least 80 percent of health care costs. Businesses could also proactively choose to send their workers into the government plan while contributing money to the program to cover their costs. Employees would have the option of leaving their company plan on their own as well.

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Re: Issues 2020: Medicare for All/Public Option

#4

Post by AndyinPA » Mon Mar 18, 2019 9:04 pm

It is utterly appalling that this country doesn't have universal health care, or Medicare for all. It's only one of many things that many other first-world (or whatever they're calling it now) take for granted and people here have no clue. I definitely want to see the Democrats run on this in 2020. It will be a lot harder for twitler to promise cheaper, better health care for all the way he did in 2016. He has a track record on that now, and it's not good.

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Re: Issues 2020: Medicare for All/Public Option

#5

Post by Addie » Wed Mar 27, 2019 3:14 pm

Roll Call: ‘Medicare for all’ doesn’t just rival Canada’s system. It goes further

An insurance system proposed by Rep. Pramila Jayapal takes cues from other countries, but is unique in other ways

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Re: Issues 2020: Medicare for All/Public Option

#6

Post by Addie » Tue Apr 16, 2019 4:22 pm

Bloomberg
Biggest US health insurer wades into Medicare for All fight

The U.S.’s biggest health insurer sharply criticized the Medicare for All proposals being debated by Democrats, wading into a heated Washington political debate that’s likely to dominate the 2020 presidential race and the conversation about the future of private health plans in America.

For months, health insurers have kept mostly quiet about the proposal, the most-ambitious versions of which would replace privately financed health coverage with Medicare, the government program that covers about 60 million mostly elderly Americans. On Tuesday, UnitedHealth Group Inc.’s chief executive officer said such proposals would amount to a “wholesale disruption of American health care.”

As a source of coverage, UnitedHealth is almost as large as Medicare itself. It provides health-insurance services to 49.7 million people, and last year recorded revenue of $226.2 billion. Along with insurance, it operates physician practices, sells consulting and data services, and administers drug benefits. It also covers millions of people in the private-sector versions of Medicare and Medicaid.

Despite its immense size, the company has kept a relatively low profile with the wider public. Its quarterly earnings are typically buttoned-up events, treated as a financial indicator for other insurers who report later in the earnings season. Engaging in a political fight could turn it into a political target as Democrats look for winning issues.

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Re: Issues 2020: Medicare for All/Public Option

#7

Post by tek » Tue Apr 16, 2019 4:59 pm

Health insurers siphon money out of healthcare and send it to their executives and shareholders.

So yeah, they are a critical part of the healthcare system. :sarcasm:
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Re: Issues 2020: Medicare for All/Public Option

#8

Post by Dan1100 » Tue Apr 16, 2019 8:45 pm

tek wrote:
Tue Apr 16, 2019 4:59 pm
Health insurers siphon money out of healthcare and send it to their executives and shareholders.

So yeah, they are a critical part of the healthcare system. :sarcasm:
Well, F@!##ing United Health Care sure as F!@#!#ing isn't spending it on customer service infrastructure or modern customer facing IT.

I have my eye insurance with them. There is no way to email them, no way to contact them on the website and no address to snail mail them on the website. There is just one number to call and you get put on hold for at least an hour to talk to someone who then redirects your call to another number where you get put on hold for an hour again or just plain cut off. When you do talk to them, they are snotty to you.

It literally took me over 2 hours to update my credit card expiration date. When I first got it, it took me 2 1/2 hours to fix a minor account screw up on their part (they signed me up for 2 policies instead of 1 for some unknown reason).

They suck and I can't wait to cancel them when my one year commitment is over.
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Re: Issues 2020: Medicare for All/Public Option

#9

Post by Addie » Wed Apr 17, 2019 7:45 am

Axios - Drew Altman, Kaiser Family Foundation: For low-income people, employer health coverage is worse than ACA

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Re: Issues 2020: Medicare for All/Public Option

#10

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Wed Apr 17, 2019 10:02 am

What is the likelihood of the Resistance becoming the shareholders? To me it is like voting for more women, POC, LBGQT, etc., for public office.
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Re: Issues 2020: Medicare for All/Public Option

#11

Post by Chilidog » Wed Apr 17, 2019 10:08 am

Dan1100 wrote:
Tue Apr 16, 2019 8:45 pm
tek wrote:
Tue Apr 16, 2019 4:59 pm
Health insurers siphon money out of healthcare and send it to their executives and shareholders.

So yeah, they are a critical part of the healthcare system. :sarcasm:
Well, F@!##ing United Health Care sure as F!@#!#ing isn't spending it on customer service infrastructure or modern customer facing IT.

I have my eye insurance with them. There is no way to email them, no way to contact them on the website and no address to snail mail them on the website. There is just one number to call and you get put on hold for at least an hour to talk to someone who then redirects your call to another number where you get put on hold for an hour again or just plain cut off. When you do talk to them, they are snotty to you.

It literally took me over 2 hours to update my credit card expiration date. When I first got it, it took me 2 1/2 hours to fix a minor account screw up on their part (they signed me up for 2 policies instead of 1 for some unknown reason).

They suck and I can't wait to cancel them when my one year commitment is over.
I’m willing to bet that quitting them is like trying to quit “workout anytime.”

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Re: Issues 2020: Medicare for All/Public Option

#12

Post by Jim » Wed Apr 17, 2019 11:01 am

Bernie Sanders gets support for 'Medicare for All' proposal from Fox News audience
Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., held a town hall on Monday on Fox News and drew unexpected support from the audience for his plan to provide government-run health insurance to all Americans.

“I want to ask the audience a question, if you could raise your hand here,” moderator Bret Baier said, addressing the crowd assembled in Bethlehem, Pa., to see Sanders speak. “A show of hands of how many people get their insurance from work, private insurance right now.”

Most in the audience raised a hand.

“Now of those,” Baier continued, “how many are willing to transition to what the senator says, a government-run system?”

Approximately the same number of people, many of them cheering loudly, raised a hand again, apparently surprising Baier, who added, “There’s 180 million people on private insurance, and they would be lost, right?”

“Fair question,” Sanders responded. “I know it’s what the right wing throws out, so let me answer it, all right? Millions of people every single year lose their health insurance, you know why? They get fired or they quit and they go to another employer. I was a mayor for eight years and you know what I did, what probably every mayor in America does, is you look around for the best insurance program, the most cost-effective insurance. You change insurance. Every year, millions of workers wake up in the morning and their employer has changed the insurance that they have. Maybe they liked the doctors, some people are nodding their heads, OK. So this is not new, every year. Now what we’re talking about actually is stability. That when you have a ‘Medicare for All’ it is there now and will be there in the future.”
Even FOX News fans are starting to get it.

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Re: Issues 2020: Medicare for All/Public Option

#13

Post by Addie » Fri Apr 19, 2019 12:07 pm

Vox
CBO: over 1 million Americans have become uninsured since 2016

It’s not the Mueller report, but it is important.


More than 1 million Americans have lost health coverage since 2016, a new report from the Congressional Budget Office finds.

The report — which came out within hours of the Mueller report on Thursday and so didn’t get much attention — follows other studies, all suggesting that America’s uninsured rate is rising under President Trump, whose administration has passed new rules that make it more difficult to enroll in coverage.

The CBO estimates that the number of Americans without insurance has risen from 27.5 million in 2016 to 28.9 million in 2018, an increase of 1.4 million Americans going uninsured.

Much of that increase is concentrated in the Medicaid program, where the Trump administration has approved new rules like work requirements that can make it more difficult for low-income Americans to enroll in the program.

The other area where health coverage has declined is among Americans who purchase their own health insurance outside the Affordable Care Act’s marketplaces. ...

It’s notable that these declines in coverage are happening even though Republicans were unable to repeal the Affordable Care Act — and all before the repeal of the requirement to carry health insurance took effect (that provision only kicked in at the start of 2019). The rising uninsured rate is happening at a moment when, on paper, Obamacare looks a lot like it did under President Obama.

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Re: Issues 2020: Medicare for All/Public Option

#14

Post by Addie » Sun May 05, 2019 9:42 am

New York Mag - Ed Kilgore
The Health-Care Crisis Has Spread to Employer-Sponsored Health Insurance

For most of this century, the big U.S. health-care policy issue has been providing insurance to the uninsured, including the uninsurable people with expensive health conditions. Yes, the majority of non-elderly Americans covered by employer-based insurance were affected by this debate insofar as sharing the costs of more universal coverage would increase their premiums and/or taxes. But for the most part, Americans were relatively happy with the insurance they got at work.

That’s changing, as is graphically illustrated by a major new survey conducted by the Los Angeles Times and the Kaiser Family Foundation that shows insurance deductibles, co-pays, and other “cost sharing” requirements by insurers are putting the squeeze on affected policyholders in a big way.

As the Times’ Noam Levy explains, the rise of deductibles has been dramatic:
In the last 12 years, annual deductibles in job-based health plans have nearly quadrupled and now average more than $1,300.


Yet Americans’ savings are not keeping pace, data show. And more than four in 10 workers enrolled in a high-deductible plan report they don’t have enough savings to cover the deductible.


One in six Americans who get insurance through their jobs say they’ve had to make “difficult sacrifices” to pay for healthcare in the last year, including cutting back on food, moving in with friends or family, or taking extra jobs. And one in five say healthcare costs have eaten up all or most of their savings.

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Re: Issues 2020: Medicare for All/Public Option

#15

Post by Addie » Sun May 12, 2019 2:25 pm

Associated Press
Washington to offer first ‘public option’ insurance in US

SEATTLE (AP) — Washington is set to become the first state to enter the private health insurance market with a universally available public option.

A set of tiered public plans will cover standard services and are expected to be up to 10% cheaper than comparable private insurance, thanks in part to savings from a cap on rates paid to providers. But unlike existing government-managed plans, Washington’s public plans are set to be available to all residents regardless of income by 2021.

The Legislature approved the plan last month, and Gov. Jay Inslee is scheduled to sign it into law Monday.

The move thrusts Washington into the national debate over the government’s role in health care, with a hybrid model that puts the state to the left of market-only approaches but stops short of a completely public system.

Instead, the state will dictate the terms of the public option plans but hire private insurance companies to administer them, saving the state from having to create a new bureaucracy — and guaranteeing a role for the insurance industry in managing the new public option.

Lawmakers in at least eight other states including Colorado and New Mexico have proposed their own public option measures. But so far none have passed legislation implementing a public option.

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Re: Issues 2020: Medicare for All/Public Option

#16

Post by Addie » Mon Jun 03, 2019 4:22 pm

Philadelphia Inquirer
A large Pa. employer supports ‘Medicare for all’ to ‘remove an albatross from American business’

EASTON, Pa. — Walk into a big-box retailer such as Walmart or Michaels and you’re likely to see MCS Industries’ picture frames, decorative mirrors or kitschy wall décor.

Adjacent to a dairy farm a few miles west of downtown Easton, MCS is the nation’s largest maker of such household products. But MCS doesn’t actually make anything here anymore. It has moved its manufacturing operations to Mexico and China, with the last manufacturing jobs departing this city along the Delaware River in 2005. MCS now has about 175 U.S. employees and 600 people overseas.

“We were going to lose the business because we were no longer competitive,” CEO Richard Master explained. And one of the biggest impediments to keeping labor costs in line, he said, has been the increasing expense of health coverage in the United States.

Today, he’s at the vanguard of a small but growing group of business executives who are lining up to support a “Medicare for All” national health program. He argues not that health care is a human right, but that covering everyone with a government plan and decoupling health care coverage from the workplace would benefit entrepreneurship.

In February, Master stood with U.S. Rep. Pramila Jayapal (D-Wash.) outside the Capitol after she introduced her Medicare for All bill. “This bill removes an albatross from the neck of American business, puts more money in consumer products and will boost our economy,” he said.

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Re: Issues 2020: Medicare for All/Public Option

#17

Post by ZekeB » Mon Jun 03, 2019 5:00 pm

Yes. Put a tariff on their goods so consumers won't have to pay for it. I'm surprised Trump hasn't come up with this one.

OTOH I am in favor of a nationwide value added tax to pay for it. This would level the playing field somewhat.
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Re: Issues 2020: Medicare for All/Public Option

#18

Post by Dave at Sea » Tue Jun 04, 2019 3:43 am

The militant option to single payer...

Make public health care part of the (Civil) Defense budget...

Then get started training Federal Civil Defense Nurses and Doctors, while building Federal Civil Defense Hospitals and Mobile Clinics, then deploy them across the nation to provide health care for all.

Start with basic & emergency care and expand each year.

Of course you could choose private health insurance and private health treatment if you wanted, or you could use the Federal public system.

And in some areas it may be economical for the DoD to employ PMCs - in this case Private Medical Contractors - subject to strict oversight.

That way increased military spending might help more Americans.

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Re: Issues 2020: Medicare for All/Public Option

#19

Post by Addie » Fri Jun 14, 2019 5:06 pm

San Francisco Chronicle: California shows 2020 Democrats how to get to Medicare for All

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Re: Issues 2020: Medicare for All/Public Option

#20

Post by Addie » Fri Jul 05, 2019 9:08 am

The Hill
Biden says he would bring back ObamaCare's individual mandate ...

Biden, who is the frontrunner in the 2020 Democratic primary, played an integral role in the construction of the Affordable Care Act as former President Obama's vice president.

While the healthcare law has grown in popularity over the years, Democratic presidential contenders, including Biden, have said the law needs changes and updates.

However, progressives in the race, including Sens. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) have proposed a health care overhaul, saying ObamaCare does not go far enough. Both have backed moving toward a “Medicare for all” model.

Biden told Cuomo that he would rather have an option for Americans to buy into Medicare for all.

"If you provide an option for anybody who in fact wants to buy into Medicare for All, they can buy in," he said.

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Re: Issues 2020: Medicare for All/Public Option

#21

Post by Addie » Mon Jul 15, 2019 8:30 am

Current Affairs - Benjamin Studebaker & Nathan J. Robinson
Why A “Public Option” Isn’t Enough

The point of replacing private health insurance with single payer


At one point, the meaning of “Medicare For All” was quite clear. Under Medicare For All, every American, instead of having to navigate the tangled and inefficient marketplace of for-profit health insurance corporations, would simply be enrolled in Medicare. Instead of people paying premiums and copays to an insurance company, they would pay taxes, and those taxes would be used to pay providers. As Dr. Abdul El-Sayed wrote in this magazine, Medicare For All is “single-payer healthcare that would provide cradle-to-grave government-supported healthcare for all Americans.”

But as Democrats have realized how well the phrase “Medicare For All” polls with voters, its meaning has been deliberately muddied. Most of the Democratic presidential candidates now support something they call “Medicare For All,” but it’s often not clear what they mean by it. Some, when they clarify specifics, make it clear that what they actually want is a “public option,” i.e. a new kind of government insurance plan that you can buy within the structure of the existing healthcare marketplace. Pete Buttigieg says that he believes in “Medicare For All Who Want It.” Presumably, what this would mean in practice is that when you go to healthcare.gov to select your insurance plan, one option would be a thing called “Medicare For All,” and you could buy it, through premiums, if you chose it. This is, as Dr. El-Sayed points out, a “rebranding” of the concept, an attempt to present Bernie Sanders’ single payer proposal and Barack Obama’s old abandoned “public option” idea as roughly the same.

But how do proponents of (actual) Medicare For All respond to the basic arguments made by those proposing “Medicare For All Who Want It”? What Pete Buttigieg and other moderates say is this: Why force people into a government program? Most people are satisfied with their healthcare (though note the huge difference between the 70 percent of Medicare enrollees who say they are satisfied with the cost, and the 51 percent of people with private insurance who are satisfied with cost). Why abolish private insurance? Why not just have insurance companies compete against a government plan in an open marketplace where people can choose? That way, everyone who wants Medicare gets it, while people who are satisfied with their current insurance can keep it. Everyone wins. The implication here is that anyone who supports a full single-payer plan, in which everyone would just be insured under a government program, must be rigidly ideological, wanting to shutter the private insurance industry for no good reason. Why would we do that instead of just providing a new option?

To understand why full “single payer” health insurance is the left’s goal, rather than just “another insurance plan on the marketplace,” it helps first to understand the left’s vision for how healthcare should work. In an ideal world, your healthcare would not be something you have to think about very much. If you got sick, you would choose a doctor’s office and make an appointment. You would go to that appointment and see the doctor. Then you would leave. You would not have to apply for insurance, not have to pay bills. And this would be the case no matter who you were or how much money you made. In Britain, this is what you do already. As U.K. Current Affairs contributor Aisling McCrea has explained, the NHS makes healthcare easy. “Insurance” isn’t a part of it at all: Your relationship is between you and your doctor, not you and your doctor and your doctor’s hospital’s billing department and your insurance company. Leftists dream of making healthcare as easy as possible to receive and universally accessible to all regardless of how much money they have.

Private health insurance is an unnecessary part of the healthcare system. Insurance companies are middlemen, and insurance just exists to make sure that providers get paid. It was our government’s own choice to encourage the proliferation of private insurance, through laws like the Health Maintenance Organization Act of 1973. It was the federal government that subsidized private insurance companies and encouraged employers to use them. Other countries didn’t build this kind of healthcare system, for two reasons:
It doesn’t cover everyone.

It creates a bloated, inefficient insurance bureaucracy.

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Re: Issues 2020: Medicare for All/Public Option

#22

Post by Addie » Tue Jul 16, 2019 10:07 am

USA Today OpEd - David Steil
Republican business owner and former state lawmaker: We need Medicare for All. Here's why.

It's time to accept that the free market cannot handle the demands of the healthcare industry.


From 1993 to 2008, I served as a lawmaker with the Republican Party, representing the 31st District in the Pennsylvania House of Representatives, while also building my manufacturing business from the ground up.

In many ways, my story is typical of what the American vision of free market capitalism can deliver. It might surprise you to know that I’m also part of the growing coalition of people nationwide who support Medicare for All.

Despite the fact that Medicare for All has gained traction in large part due to our country’s most famous democratic-socialist, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I’m about as far from a socialist as you can be.

But I know that if we’re going to grow, expand and improve our market-based economy, it’s time to drastically overhaul the way we finance health care.

I also believe it’s possible for markets to fail, because there are services that they’re incapable of providing efficiently. There’s no better example than our health insurance system.

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Re: Issues 2020: Medicare for All/Public Option

#23

Post by Addie » Thu Jul 18, 2019 9:00 pm

The Hill
Health care moves to center stage in Democratic primary fight

The battle over health care has moved to center stage in the Democratic primary, as Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) ratchets up his fight with former Vice President Joe Biden over “Medicare for All.”

Democrats successfully took control of the House by running on protecting ObamaCare during the 2018 midterm election, but are now struggling with internal divisions over whether to move beyond the health law and dramatically expand the government’s role in providing care.

In the past week, Biden and Sanders have taken aim at each other over the Vermont senator’s proposal to eliminate private insurance and replace it with Medicare for All.

Biden has pushed a more incremental plan of keeping ObamaCare while expanding its subsidies and offering a government-run “public option.” He has sought to draw a contrast with Sanders by highlighting that under his plan, people can keep their private insurance.

When he announced his health plan this week, Biden equated Medicare for All with the GOP’s ObamaCare repeal attempts.

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Re: Issues 2020: Medicare for All/Public Option

#24

Post by Addie » Fri Jul 19, 2019 3:16 pm

New Republic - Alex Shephard
Biden’s Pitch to Voters: Dream Small

Running as the inheritor of Obama's legacy, the former vice president offers a health care plan that lacks audacity and offers little hope.


If there’s one thing Joe Biden wants people to know about his new health care plan, it’s this: It is not Medicare for All. “Read the plan,” he told reporters about his proposal, which would bolster Obamacare and add a public option. “I’m not criticizing Bernie. It’s just everybody should know the Medicare plan that will replace existing Medicare, it’s not the same plan. It doesn’t mean it’s not good or bad or different, but it’s different. It’s not the same plan.”

Driving home the point, Biden has spent much of the week targeting Sanders, making the case that Medicare for All is both a pipe dream and, apparently, an affront to Barack Obama’s legacy. “I knew the Republicans would do everything in their power to repeal Obamacare,” he said in a promotional video timed to the release of his health care plan. “They still are. But I’m surprised that so many Democrats are running on getting rid of it.” ...

Biden’s modest health care proposal is clearly intended to underline what he believes are his strengths. It is a clear, unrepentant extension of the centerpiece of Barack Obama’s legacy, the Affordable Care Act. It is a plan designed to remind voters that Biden once worked for a guy that nearly every Democratic voter holds in high esteem—which is still what likely supports the former veep’s frontrunner status. It is also, perhaps more importantly, designed to reassure skittish Democrats. While most of the field is following Sanders’s lead and embracing universal health care—and, in many instances, advocating the phaseout of private health insurance—Biden is betting that small fixes to the status quo make for the best politics.

“Under the proposal I have, you would be able to keep your insurance with your employer if your employer is still prepared to pay for the insurance,” Biden said, echoing Obama’s speeches on the Affordable Care Act. This 2020 proposal would include a buy-in to a public option that resembles Medicare, and it would also use tax increases on the wealthy to expand coverage—though Biden’s plan, unlike Medicare for All, would still leave millions without any insurance. The former vice president has defended this on the stump by arguing that an incremental approach is best, calling a public option “the quickest ... most rational way to get universal coverage.” Biden has also labeled Medicare for All “risky.”

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Re: Issues 2020: Medicare for All/Public Option

#25

Post by p0rtia » Fri Jul 19, 2019 3:25 pm

:brickwallsmall: :brickwallsmall: :brickwallsmall:
No matter where you go, there you are! :towel:
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