Unfamiliar Battlefields, The 2020 Map

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Re: Unfamiliar Battlefields, The 2020 Map

#51

Post by Lani » Sat Jul 27, 2019 3:04 am

3 GOP Representatives Have Dropped Reelection Bids This Week Alone
Rep. Martha Roby (R-AL) announced Friday that she will not run for reelection in 2020, making her the third Republican to decide against a reelection bid this week.
https://talkingpointsmemo.com/news/mart ... ement-2020

GOP is losing over 20% of women congresscritters. Roby won by 60%+, so probably a safe seat. But who knows?
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Re: Unfamiliar Battlefields, The 2020 Map

#52

Post by Addie » Mon Jul 29, 2019 8:36 am

Sioux Falls Argus Leader
Democrats 'actively recruiting' candidates for statewide offices, chair says

Democrats have remained mum as Republican candidate campaigns in South Dakota are starting to show signs of life for the 2020 election.

No Democratic candidates have announced for either the U.S. House or U.S. Senate seats up for election next year while on the Republican side, freshman state Rep. Scyller Borglum of Rapid City has announced her intention to run against U.S. Sen. Mike Rounds in a primary.

Although Rounds and U.S. Rep. Dusty Johnson haven't formally announced their candidacies for 2020, they've started making campaign appearances at parades or fundraisers.

The South Dakota Democratic Party is "actively recruiting" candidates for statewide, county and city-level offices and the party is looking forward to a "competitive 2020 election," said party Chair Paula Hawks.

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Re: Unfamiliar Battlefields, The 2020 Map

#53

Post by Reality Check » Mon Jul 29, 2019 9:56 am

Lani wrote:
Sat Jul 27, 2019 3:04 am
3 GOP Representatives Have Dropped Reelection Bids This Week Alone
:snippity:
I think we will see more attrition on the Republican side. I think it is sinking in that the Democrats are going to control the House for several election cycles and being in the minority isn't fun.
"“If you’re not outraged, you’re not paying attention.”

Heather Heyer, November 2016

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Re: Unfamiliar Battlefields, The 2020 Map

#54

Post by Lani » Wed Aug 07, 2019 6:10 am

Breaking News: Orange County, longtime GOP stronghold, now has more registered Democrats than Republicans
http://nsl.latimes.com/T/v40000016c6b1d ... 7446f5256f
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Re: Unfamiliar Battlefields, The 2020 Map

#55

Post by Addie » Sun Aug 11, 2019 10:56 am

Richmond Times-Dispatch
Virginia population projections show the growth is in Democratic strongholds



This map shows Virginia's current congressional districts. Much of the state's projected population growth in the next 20 years will be concentrated in 10 large counties and cities in the eastern part of the state, particularly in Northern Virginia, currently home to the 8th, 10th and 11th districts.

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Re: Unfamiliar Battlefields, The 2020 Map

#56

Post by Addie » Tue Aug 13, 2019 11:39 am

New York Mag - Ed Kilgore
Trump’s State-by-State Approval Ratings Should Scare the MAGA Out of Him

There has been a lot of discussion in political circles about Donald Trump’s job-approval ratings, what they portend, and Trump’s Electoral College strategy for 2020, which doesn’t necessarily require a popular-vote plurality. But in the end, of course, the conjunction of the Electoral College with Trump’s state-by-state popularity is where the deal will go down.

The online polling firm Civiqs has published a new set of state-by-state job-approval ratings for Trump as of August 11, and it shows how the president’s overall standing (a 43 percent approval rating nationally, which happens to match the current RealClearPolitics polling average) might translate into electorate votes. It’s not a pretty picture for the president, to put it mildly.

Civiqs shows the president’s net approval ratios being underwater (i.e., negative) in 10 states he carried in 2016: Arizona, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Michigan, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, and Wisconsin. If that were to represent how the 2020 elections turn out, Trump would have a booming 119 electoral votes. And it’s not as though he’s on a knife’s edge between victory and defeat in all these Trump 2016 states where he’s doing poorly: He’s underwater by 12 points in Pennsylvania, 11 in Michigan, and nine in Arizona, North Carolina, and Wisconsin. And there’s virtually no indication that states that narrowly went for Clinton in 2016 are trending in Trump’s direction: His approval ratios are minus 18 in Colorado, minus 15 in Minnesota, minus 12 in Nevada, and minus 27 in New Hampshire. These are, by the way, polls of registered voters, not just “adults,” so they should be a relatively sound reflection of the views of the electorate. ...

In case you just don’t trust this particular pollster, the other publicly available survey of state-by-state presidential job approval is from Morning Consult, and its latest numbers (as of July) are pretty similar. They show Georgia and Texas as positive for Trump, and North Carolina as very close. But all the other “battleground states” are quite the reach for the incumbent.

If you credit these polls at all, Trump’s reelection will require (1) a big late improvement in his approval ratings, which is possible but unlikely based on long-standing patterns during his polarizing presidency; (2) a campaign that succeeds in making the election turn on theoretical fears about his opponent rather than actual fears about a second Trump term, which won’t be easy either; (3) a big Republican turnout advantage, which is less likely among the larger presidential electorate than it was in 2018; or (4) some diabolical ability to thread the needle despite every contrary indicator, which superstitious Democrats fear for obvious reasons.

If the fourth scenario — a win against all the evidence — is Trump’s best hope for reelection, he’s the one who needs to experience some fear and trembling heading toward 2020. If anything, there’s evidence that he is likely to undershoot rather than overshoot his approval ratings as the sitting president of a country whose direction lacks any kind of public confidence. Beyond that, even those who succeed by selling their souls to the devil don’t have the collateral to pull that off twice.

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Re: Unfamiliar Battlefields, The 2020 Map

#57

Post by Addie » Thu Aug 15, 2019 12:17 pm

The Hill
House Democrats targeting six more Trump districts for 2020 ...

The districts include Florida's 16th district, Iowa's 2nd district, Michigan's 3rd district, Ohio's 12th district, Virginia's 5th district, and Montana's at-large district. ...

The newest targets include the seat held by Rep. Justin Amash (I-Mich.), who formally left the GOP last month, as well as the seat held by Democratic Iowa Rep. Dave Loebsack, who is not seeking another term in 2020.

The Cook Political Report has rated both of those districts as toss-ups.

Rep. Greg Gianforte's (R-Mont.) plans to run for governor have put the state's at-large House district on Democrats' radar. Despite Trump carrying the state by 21 points in 2016, Democrats are hopeful they can grab the seat after Gov. Steve Bullock (D-Mont.) won reelection that same year. Democratic Sen. John Tester won reelection in the state in 2018.

While the Cook Political Report rates Florida's 16th congressional district and Ohio's 12th district as likely Republican, Democrats see an opportunity to target the suburban vote in the districts.

Democrats also see an opportunity in Virginia's 5th congressional district, held by Rep. Denver Riggleman (R). The Cook Political Report rates the seat as likely Republican, but Republicans poured money into defending the district in 2018.

The newest target list demonstrates Democrats' optimism about growing their majority in the 2020 general election, especially among suburban voters potentially turned off by Trump.

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Re: Unfamiliar Battlefields, The 2020 Map

#58

Post by Addie » Tue Aug 20, 2019 3:13 pm

Politico
Dems fear another rural wipeout will reelect Trump

Pitches by some 2020 candidates aren’t yet translating into a broad conversation about the needs of rural voters.


DES MOINES, Iowa — As Democratic presidential candidates descended on the Iowa State Fair, a plane buzzed overhead, an ominous warning fluttering behind it on a banner: “Focus on Rural America.”

Democrats hoping to win the White House in 2020 recognize how critical that advice is after 2016, when Hillary Clinton turned in strong performances in many cities and suburbs but lost rural voters 2-to-1, falling short to President Donald Trump by slim margins in Florida, Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. Democrats clawed back some gains in rural counties in the 2018 midterm elections, and they want to build on that momentum in 2020.

But the presidential primary, often dominated by cultural issues and Trump-driven hot buttons, including immigration and race, isn’t helping their case. ...

Former Agriculture Secretary and Iowa Gov. Tom Vilsack — who just three years ago was a lone soldier in his quest to get the Democratic Party to show up in remote parts of the country — said that in other presidential cycles, candidates often thought if they talked about farmers, they would reach rural Americans. But people living in rural areas often work in education, health care, retail and manufacturing — not farming.

“The depth and the substance of these plans reflects a genuine effort to speak directly to rural places,” said Vilsack, who advised a handful of candidates on their platforms, including Biden, Warren, Gillibrand and Buttigieg. “It is a positive sign for the party.”

He added that a strong message emphasizing economic opportunities in rural America, combined with aggressive organizing in those communities, would make a difference in a campaign against Trump.

Democrats are climbing out of a deep hole in rural America. In 2008, Obama lost rural voters by 17 points, and by 23 points in 2012. Rock bottom arrived in 2016, when Clinton ran 34 points behind Trump among voters, according to data collected by Catalist, a Democratic data platform.

By 2018, Democrats rebounded slightly, losing rural areas by 27 points, an improvement over 2016. But “some Trump voters who sat out in 2018 will come back in 2020, so it will be important to see how well Democrats can maintain the momentum they built in these areas in the midterms,” said Yair Ghitza, chief scientist at Catalist. “I don’t think anybody expects Democrats to win rural areas writ large, but keeping the margin close is important for the overall state results.”

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Re: Unfamiliar Battlefields, The 2020 Map

#59

Post by Addie » Wed Aug 21, 2019 3:54 pm

NPR: Texas Emerges As A Battleground State Ahead Of 2020 Elections
Blue Virginia: Central and Western Virginia Democrats Form Rural GroundGame Coalition

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Re: Unfamiliar Battlefields, The 2020 Map

#60

Post by Addie » Wed Aug 21, 2019 9:02 pm

Politico
Team Trump launches 'coast-to-coast' campaign for suburban women

But a possible recession could make the message of women’s economic empowerment a tougher sell in 2020.


President Donald Trump’s reelection campaign will dispatch more than a dozen female surrogates on Thursday to some of the most important 2020 battleground states in its first major push to mobilize suburban women — a critical voting bloc that revolted against Republican candidates as recently as the midterm elections last fall.

Campaign officials have billed the cross-country events as both a celebration of women’s suffrage — Monday marks the 99th anniversary of the adoption of the 19th Amendment, which guarantees women the right to vote — and a coordinated effort to train pro-Trump women to become effective volunteers in their communities. A campaign official involved with the planning said about 2,000 attendees were expected across the gatherings in 13 states, as of Tuesday. ...

It’s the first test for the Trump campaign’s women’s coalition — a mashup of the president’s most loyal female supporters, ranging from pageant queens and YouTube personalities to Christian podcasters and political wives — and it comes as the Trump administration grapples with warnings of a possible recession that could make the coalition’s message of women’s economic empowerment a tougher sell next November. Trump and his allies have repeatedly pointed to the women’s unemployment rate, which has hovered between 3.5 and 4 percent since last summer, and the inclusion of a paid family leave plan in the latest White House budget as evidence that American women have benefited from his policies. ...

In addition to Iowa and Georgia, the campaign has planned women-focused events in Arizona, Michigan, Nevada, Texas, Pennsylvania, Colorado, North Carolina, Virginia, Ohio, Minnesota and Florida. Each will feature a member of the Women for Trump advisory board, some of whom received a general outline with tips on how to engage prospective volunteers and promote the president’s agenda.

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Re: Unfamiliar Battlefields, The 2020 Map

#61

Post by Addie » Sun Aug 25, 2019 9:09 am

270towin.com




The 2016 Map below:


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Re: Unfamiliar Battlefields, The 2020 Map

#62

Post by Addie » Mon Aug 26, 2019 11:49 am

Miami Herald
Independents’ influence grows as political parties race to register Florida voters

In battleground Florida — a state President Donald Trump believes he must win next year to be reelected — the right and left are already in voter-registration mode to build their ranks.

Democrats have audaciously aimed to add 1 million people to their cause ahead of the presidential election. Republicans, meanwhile, have quietly shrunk Democrats’ numerical advantage below 244,000 voters for the first time since at least 1972.

Both parties are setting out early in hot pursuit of an estimated 4 million unregistered and eligible voters.

But the arms race isn’t only about out-organizing the opposition. Heading into 2020, both Democrats and Republicans are also shifting tactics to keep voters from joining the fastest-growing bloc in Florida: independents, whose meteoric rise has thrown a state known for razor-thin election margins even further into electoral uncertainty.

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Re: Unfamiliar Battlefields, The 2020 Map

#63

Post by Addie » Tue Aug 27, 2019 7:27 am

Axios
Trump's net approval rating sinks in every battleground state

President Trump's net approval rating has plunged in every key battleground state since taking office in January 2017, according to Morning Consult's tracking poll.

Why it matters: These are the states that Republicans and Democrats are vying for in 2020, and where, as of now, the campaigns think the presidential election will be decided, according to conversations with several Trump and Democratic campaign staffers.

In addition to the key purple states — Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin — that both sides recognize as targets, the Trump campaign has its sights set on Minnesota, Nevada, New Hampshire and New Mexico, all states Trump lost in 2016, several campaign officials said. ...

Meanwhile, Democrats are hoping they can pick up Florida, North Carolina, Arizona, Texas and Georgia, per talks with campaign aides and Democratic strategists.
"The midterms were a strong indicator of the Dem energy in these states, particularly in Arizona, Florida and Texas, and set the groundwork for us to flip them," one Democratic strategist said.

Note, however, that Trump still has a positive approval rating in Texas and Georgia, even though it's smaller than it used to be. "We dream that the Democrats think they can get Texas. It's a total fantasy," one Trump campaign official said.

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Re: Unfamiliar Battlefields, The 2020 Map

#64

Post by Addie » Tue Aug 27, 2019 9:47 am

The Economist
Rural Minnesota’s Democratic voters are shifting allegiances

Republicans see an opening with voters in regions like the Iron Range ...


Loyalty to resource extraction endures in Eveleth and across four small mining cities—called the Quad Cities—in a region known as the Iron Range. But much else is shifting. Mr Vlaisavljevich, who was first elected in 1987, recalls how the Quad Cities had some 14,000 miners in the 1980s. That has dwindled to just 4,200. Their well-paid jobs once sustained a roaring regional economy. Eveleth alone boasted several car dealerships, jewellery and furniture shops, restaurants and “houses selling like crazy”. No more. “Back then it was hard to find parking,” says the mayor, gesturing to a wide, near-deserted street by the town hall.

Mr Vlaisavljevich has also changed. He and his family were long proud Democrats, like most on the Range. He voted for Barack Obama as president. Today he has a placard praising Donald Trump glued to his mayoral desk. He points to a Christmas card sent from the president on his wall. On the desk a joke roll of toilet paper bears an image of Hillary Clinton.

“You know what I am? I’m a Democrat that supports Republican policies,” he says, describing his political transition. “The Democrats are two parties in one, and the left has abandoned the middle class.” He lauds Republican tariffs on imported steel, saying that would once have been a Democratic policy. He thinks Democrats are soft on immigration. He resents rich, big-city folk in Minneapolis, for “selfishly” blocking plans to establish open-pit mines for copper and other materials. “Now it’s a survival thing. With all the environmental groups, they want to stop all that mining.”

In nearby Hibbing, Todd Hall is also from a mining family of fervent Democrats. But he and his wife, Kirstie Hall, have jumped party, calling liberal-minded Democrats out of touch. “The working class don’t recognise the Democratic Party,” claims Mrs Hall. She calls a statewide plan to increase petrol taxes an emblem of neglect for rural concerns. The Halls are also troubled by an influx of Somali refugees to other towns in the state.

So for three years she has organised a Republican float for Hibbing’s annual street parade. At first, she says the float was met with no more than boos and jeers. But sympathy is growing, she says. Mr Hall says it was once socially unacceptable to admit to supporting Republicans but that the taboo is lifting. Mr Vlaisavljevich says local union leaders know rank-and-file members are drifting to support “that guy”, meaning Mr Trump.

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Re: Unfamiliar Battlefields, The 2020 Map

#65

Post by Addie » Wed Aug 28, 2019 12:54 pm

Daily Beast
Dems Sound Alarm: Trump Is ‘Carpet-Bombing’ Us in Key Battlegrounds

“Where’s all the support? People generally are feeling Trump is beating us on all fronts right now,” one DNC official said.


Several Democratic National Committee members have a message to their organization’s top leadership: President Trump is crushing us.

After pledging to compete everywhere ahead of the next election, multiple DNC members told The Daily Beast they have privately sounded alarms about the organization’s strategy heading into 2020, emphasizing what they view as Chairman Tom Perez’s inability to reach swing voters in Midwestern battleground states who voted for the president. A handful of Midwestern targets were critical to Trump’s general election success in 2016.

Jim Zogby, who co-chairs the DNC’s ethnic counsel, a group that represents people across different ethnic, racial, national origin, and religious identities, says he has been pushing Perez and other party leaders to expand its outreach to voters in the same areas that Trump successfully captured: Ohio, Michigan, Pennsylvania, and—a Democratic sore spot in post-2016 politics—Wisconsin.

But that outreach to the committee has fallen on deaf ears.

“In Pennsylvania, Ohio, Wisconsin, if we do events in those states that focuses on everyone else but them, that breeds resentment,” Zogby said. “That’s why [former Vice President Joe] Biden and [Sen.] Bernie [Sanders I-VT] do well, because they talk to those folks.”

Zogby was specifically referencing voters from Irish, Italian, Polish, Eastern Central European, Arab, and Armenian-American communities highly concentrated in the Midwest.

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Re: Unfamiliar Battlefields, The 2020 Map

#66

Post by Addie » Sun Sep 01, 2019 10:18 am

NBC News
Democrats' focus on the White House may be crowding out the statehouse — and it might cost them big

The party has long been hobbled by a tendency to focus on the federal government while Republicans made major investments in the states. This cycle, some party leaders are sounding the alarm.


WASHINGTON — The political map will be set for the next decade in the 2020 elections, but the outcome of the biggest race on the ballot — the one grabbing most of the Democratic Party's attention and donor dollars — will have no effect on where the lines are drawn.

That mismatch has some party leaders worried Democrats will once again miss the boat.

"I'm definitely sounding the alarm," former Attorney General Eric Holder, who now leads the National Democratic Redistricting Committee, said in an interview with NBC News.

State legislative races rarely ignite activists' passions or open donors' wallets. But with redistricting done every 10 years after the census, whoever wins states in 2020 will get to draw the maps in 2021 that will determine the playing field for congressional and state legislative elections through 2032 — not to mention make the laws that will affect millions.

"The Republicans get it," he added. "Democrats need to focus on the states in that same way."

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Re: Unfamiliar Battlefields, The 2020 Map

#67

Post by Addie » Sun Sep 01, 2019 10:24 am

WaPo - Dan Balz
The 2020 electoral map could be the smallest in years. Here’s why.

In a politically divided nation, with attitudes among many voters hardened and resistant to changing, the 2020 general election could be contested on the narrowest electoral terrain in recent memory.

Just four states are likely to determine the outcome in 2020. Each flipped to the Republicans in 2016, but President Trump won each by only a percentage point or less. The four are Pennsylvania, Michigan, Wisconsin and Florida. Many analysts point to Wisconsin as the single state upon which the election could turn.

Shifting demographics, the growing urban-rural divide and the gap between white voters with and without college educations have helped to create an electoral map unlike those of the recent past. So too have Trump’s unique profile, messaging and appeal.

“Because of the partisanship of the country and the partisanship of the president, we are now looking at the smallest map in modern political history,” said Jim Messina, who was the campaign manager for former president Barack Obama’s 2012 reelection campaign.

Both Trump’s campaign and that of his eventual Democratic challenger will seek to put other states in play. But those opportunities are fewer than in past campaigns.

Trump has done nothing to expand his base while in office, which Democrats claim will make it extremely difficult for him to win states he lost in 2016. Trump campaign officials disagree. Democrats’ aspirations for expansion rest in part on whether politically changing, Republican-held states such as North Carolina, Georgia and Arizona are truly ready to shift.

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Re: Unfamiliar Battlefields, The 2020 Map

#68

Post by Addie » Sun Sep 01, 2019 4:16 pm

NBC News
The Senate suddenly looks like it's up for grabs in 2020

Democrats need to net only four seats to get to a 51-49 majority in the Senate, and the list of seats that Republicans need to defend is growing.


WASHINGTON — This week the 2020 Senate landscape grew a bit more interesting as Georgia’s Johnny Isakson announced he was resigning at the end of the year. That put another Republican-held seat on the battleground list — the second one in Georgia — and added more evidence that control for the upper chamber of Congress is very much in play.

The Senate campaign map that is coming into view is looking more and more like a "good news," but not "great news" situation for Democrats. The party needs to net only four seats to get to a 51-49 majority in the Senate and the list of seats that Republicans need to defend is growing — but there are not a lot of easy marks.

In essence, the Democrats' path to recapturing the Senate seems to be growing clearer, but it’s not necessarily growing easier. ...

Ask Democrats and these are three states they will cite at the top of their list in the quest for four more seats and for good reason. Democrat Hillary Clinton won the popular vote in both Colorado and Maine in the 2016 presidential race. And last year, Democratic Sen. Kyrsten Sinema won the Senate race in Arizona when she beat Martha McSally.

None of these three seats are open but all of them are already rated as toss-ups by the Cook Political Report. Colorado’s Sen. Cory Gardner is a one-term incumbent who won a close race in 2014 in a state that is trending Democratic. Maine’s Sen. Susan Collins is a four-term incumbent who is caught in the middle of the shifting terrain of the GOP. And in Arizona, the incumbent is McSally, who was appointed to her seat after Sen. John McCain died — but who also lost her 2018 senate race.

Those three seats have been on Democratic radar for months followed by the question, “But how do they capture number four?”

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Re: Unfamiliar Battlefields, The 2020 Map

#69

Post by Addie » Wed Sep 04, 2019 12:48 pm

The Guardian - George Goehl
The secret to winning the Midwest: Democrats must fight big agriculture

Not since the Rev Jesse Jackson’s candidacy for the Democratic nomination in 1988 have we seen presidential hopefuls so fiercely and consistently bring the issues facing family farmers into the national conversation. This year, five candidates for the Democratic nomination say they support a ban on factory farms.

As we know, Jackson didn’t win the nomination. Michael Dukakis did, but he lost the general election, and four years later Bill Clinton became president. Under Clinton’s leadership, Democrats joined Republicans in advancing an agenda of deregulation and privatization that favored big corporations over everyday people. This didn’t go well for workers – and it was disastrous for many farmers.

“The 1996 Farm Bill stripped away the last remnants of farm programs that used to ensure farmers were paid fairly in the marketplace by managing production and setting price floors,” Ben Lilliston, the director of rural strategies and climate change at the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy, told me.

Immediately after the so-called “Freedom to Farm Bill” passed, farm prices plunged, and farmers scrambled to stay on their land. In much the same way Nafta played workers from multiple countries against each other, the Farm Bill drove down how much farmers were able to get for their goods – furthering consolidation, and furthering a factory farm boom.

The good news is that the battle for the heart and soul of today’s Democratic Party is on, with forces ready to rein in abusive corporate actors gaining momentum. One sign of that shift: five Democrats running for president – Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren, Julian Castro, Tulsi Gabbard, and Marianne Williamson – have come out in support of a ban on the expansion of factory farms. These Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) are usually massive industrial livestock operations that pollute the air and water and ruin the quality of life for people who live close to them. ...

Factory farms are far from popular. In exit polling from the midterm elections, 73% of Iowa voters said the governor and legislature should require limits to manure pollution runoff into Iowa’s waterways. It’s not surprising. Iowa is home to 3 million people, and 26 million hogs, which create the waste equivalent of 65 million people.

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Re: Unfamiliar Battlefields, The 2020 Map

#70

Post by Addie » Wed Sep 04, 2019 1:03 pm

The Hill
The 10 counties that will decide the 2020 election

Three years after a presidential election that came down to 77,000 votes in three Midwestern battlegrounds, Democrats and Republicans are eyeing a much larger battlefield ahead of the 2020 contests, one that stretches from the picturesque coastline of rural Maine to the high desert of Arizona.

Both President Trump’s campaign and the Democrats vying to replace him are scrutinizing a political map in flux, one in which attitudes and alignments are shifting and new regions are coming into play.As many as a dozen states could be up for grabs next year as economic and international uncertainty pairs with a cauldron of domestic discontent in government.

Interviews with two dozen strategists, political scientists and observers show the 10 counties across the country that will determine the outcome of the 2020 presidential election.

The critical tipping points are as diverse as the American electorate. Some are suburban neighborhoods where both Trump and former President Obama won. Others are longtime Republican strongholds that show signs of slipping. Still others have voted Democratic since the New Deal, only to be broken by Trump’s historic campaign.

Here are the 10 counties that will determine whether Trump gets a second term: ...

Erie County, Pa.
Sauk County, Wis.
Muskegon County, Mich.
Maricopa County, Ariz.
Tarrant County, Texas
New Hanover County, N.C.
Peach County, Ga.
Washington County, Minn.
Hillsborough County, N.H.
Lincoln County, Maine

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Re: Unfamiliar Battlefields, The 2020 Map

#71

Post by Addie » Fri Sep 06, 2019 10:40 am

The Hill
Texas Republicans sound alarm about rapidly evolving state

AUSTIN, Texas — Texas Republicans are sounding the alarm as Democratic presidential candidates get ready for their debate next week in Houston, warning that the Lone Star State could become more purple if the party doesn’t treat it as a 2020 battleground.

Most in the GOP are confident President Trump will win Texas and its 38 electoral votes next year, and they think Texas GOP Sen. John Cornyn will turn aside his Democratic challenger.

But they are worried they will lose more House seats a cycle after Democrats clawed back two districts as they retook their majority.

Five House Republicans have retired, including three in seats targeted by Democrats. The nonpartisan Cook Political Report rates them as either toss-ups or lean Democratic.

More broadly, Texas Republicans say the GOP can’t rest on its laurels in a state that is growing more competitive.

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Re: Unfamiliar Battlefields, The 2020 Map

#72

Post by pipistrelle » Fri Sep 06, 2019 10:57 am

Ummm, what laurels are those?

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Re: Unfamiliar Battlefields, The 2020 Map

#73

Post by voxpopuluxe » Fri Sep 06, 2019 11:06 am

Addie wrote:
Wed Sep 04, 2019 1:03 pm
The Hill

Here are the 10 counties that will determine whether Trump gets a second term: ...

Erie County, Pa.
Sauk County, Wis.
Muskegon County, Mich.
Maricopa County, Ariz.
Tarrant County, Texas
New Hanover County, N.C.
Peach County, Ga.
Washington County, Minn.
Hillsborough County, N.H.
Lincoln County, Maine

So we just buy the votes of everyone who lives in these counties and it's all good, right?
How deep could the Deep State go if the Deep State could go deep?

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Re: Unfamiliar Battlefields, The 2020 Map

#74

Post by Addie » Fri Sep 06, 2019 11:32 am

Reuters: Farm loan delinquencies surge in U.S. election battleground Wisconsin

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Re: Unfamiliar Battlefields, The 2020 Map

#75

Post by much ado » Fri Sep 06, 2019 12:09 pm

pipistrelle wrote:
Fri Sep 06, 2019 10:57 am
Ummm, what laurels are those?
Umm... The laurels of having the RWNJ vote locked up?

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