Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#51

Post by Foggy » Tue Apr 24, 2018 6:30 pm

I know we have a gardening thread around here somewhere.

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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#52

Post by kate520 » Tue Apr 24, 2018 10:39 pm

Thanks, bill! That helps a bunch. I have a south facing wall, leaves, and clay soil. I’ve been doing the opposite - in the raised bed with other things, so the garlic was getting too much water.

The chickens have greened the hell out of my yard. Aside from eating all the nasty grubs I find, they poop everywhere. :thumbs: They scratch and turn soil,too. Plus they’re highly entertaining. :lovestruck:


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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#53

Post by Bill_G » Tue Apr 24, 2018 10:50 pm

Answered you in the garden 2018 thread ....



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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#54

Post by maydijo » Tue Apr 24, 2018 10:51 pm

Geez, you mention bladder infections one time . . .

Falls are the #1 reason people end up in assisted living, but bladder infections are near the top. Not something to ignore in the elderly.



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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#55

Post by Addie » Sat May 12, 2018 6:04 pm

Associated Press
Seniors confront an unwanted late-life pest: Bullies

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) —

The unwanted were turned away from cafeteria tables. Fistfights broke out at karaoke. Dances became breeding grounds for gossip and cruelty. It became clear this place had a bullying problem on its hands. What many found surprising was that the perpetrators and victims alike were all senior citizens. Nursing homes, senior centers and housing complexes for the elderly have introduced programs, training and policies aimed at curbing spates of bullying, an issue once thought the exclusive domain of the young. ...

At a senior high-rise, a woman who saw herself as the queen of the parking garage would key the cars of those who crossed her. Elsewhere, laundry rooms became vicious places where the bullied had their detergent stolen and their clothes thrown on the floor. Bingo rooms so often devolved into battlefields — with lucky newcomers badgered and accused of cheating by veteran players. ...

Marsha Wetzel moved into a senior apartment complex in Niles, Illinois, after her partner of 30 years died and her partner's family evicted her from the home the couple shared. At Glen St. Andrew Living Community, she said she was met with relentless bullying by residents mostly focused on her being a lesbian. One man hit Wetzel's scooter with his walker and unleashed a barrage of homophobic slurs. A woman rammed her wheelchair into Wetzel's table in the dining room and knocked it over, warning "homosexuals will burn in hell." In the mailroom, someone knocked her in the head, and in an elevator, she was spit on.

"I'd just go in my room and barricade my door and just pray," said Wetzel, now 70 and living at a senior complex in Chicago. "I just felt like a slug, like I was nothing, like I wasn't even human."


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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#56

Post by TollandRCR » Sat May 12, 2018 6:16 pm

I do not know whether Mediterranean garlic requires over-wintering, but when we had a large sunny yard in Mount Vernon, VA, that was the key to growing garlic successfully. Horseradish too.


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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#57

Post by AndyinPA » Sat May 12, 2018 6:40 pm

Addie wrote:
Sat May 12, 2018 6:04 pm
Associated Press
Seniors confront an unwanted late-life pest: Bullies

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) —

The unwanted were turned away from cafeteria tables. Fistfights broke out at karaoke. Dances became breeding grounds for gossip and cruelty. It became clear this place had a bullying problem on its hands. What many found surprising was that the perpetrators and victims alike were all senior citizens. Nursing homes, senior centers and housing complexes for the elderly have introduced programs, training and policies aimed at curbing spates of bullying, an issue once thought the exclusive domain of the young. ...

At a senior high-rise, a woman who saw herself as the queen of the parking garage would key the cars of those who crossed her. Elsewhere, laundry rooms became vicious places where the bullied had their detergent stolen and their clothes thrown on the floor. Bingo rooms so often devolved into battlefields — with lucky newcomers badgered and accused of cheating by veteran players. ...

Marsha Wetzel moved into a senior apartment complex in Niles, Illinois, after her partner of 30 years died and her partner's family evicted her from the home the couple shared. At Glen St. Andrew Living Community, she said she was met with relentless bullying by residents mostly focused on her being a lesbian. One man hit Wetzel's scooter with his walker and unleashed a barrage of homophobic slurs. A woman rammed her wheelchair into Wetzel's table in the dining room and knocked it over, warning "homosexuals will burn in hell." In the mailroom, someone knocked her in the head, and in an elevator, she was spit on.

"I'd just go in my room and barricade my door and just pray," said Wetzel, now 70 and living at a senior complex in Chicago. "I just felt like a slug, like I was nothing, like I wasn't even human."
Once a bully, always a bully.

My mother was in assisted living for seven years. While nothing like that, I did see some stuff from some people that told me some people never grow up.



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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#58

Post by TollandRCR » Sat May 12, 2018 6:59 pm

That behavior may also come from creeping dementia.


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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#59

Post by stoppingby » Sat May 12, 2018 8:17 pm

AndyinPA wrote:
Sat May 12, 2018 6:40 pm




My mother was in assisted living for seven years. While nothing like that, I did see some stuff from some people that told me some people never grow up.
My mother had been living in one of those "age in place" complexes where you start in independent living, then assisted living, then nursing home.The independent living and assisted living shared a dining room. My mother developed dementia and other health problems, but they worked with her to keep her in assisted living. But there were several residents who were obsessed with who they thought "didn't belong here" and would make loud comments in the halls, etc, and occasionally corner me to "enlighten me" on my mother's condition. Of course, I had to bite my tongue, but it was everything I could do not to tell them to go eff themselves. What a bunch of nasty b--tches.



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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#60

Post by MojoSapien » Sat May 26, 2018 8:14 pm

This is how my prostate biopsy was explained to me after the fact,

https://rumble.com/v3qcyl-man-pops-gian ... 6&mc=8jxox



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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#61

Post by Addie » Mon Jul 02, 2018 1:34 pm

New York Times
A Common Virus May Play Role in Alzheimer's Disease, Study Finds

It has long been a controversial theory about Alzheimer’s disease, often dismissed by experts as a sketchy cul-de-sac off the beaten path from mainstream research.

But a new study by a team that includes prominent Alzheimer’s scientists who were previously skeptics of this theory may well change that. The research offers compelling evidence for the idea that viruses might be involved in Alzheimer’s, particularly two types of herpes that infect most people as infants and then lie dormant for years.

The study, published Thursday in the journal Neuron, found that viruses interact with genes linked to Alzheimer’s and may play a role in how Alzheimer’s develops and progresses.

The authors emphasized they did not find that these viruses cause Alzheimer’s. But their research, along with another soon-to-be-published study, suggests that viruses could kick-start an immune response that might increase the accumulation of amyloid, a protein in human brains which clumps into the telltale plaques of Alzheimer’s.

"These viruses are probably significant players in driving the immune system in Alzheimer’s,” said Joel Dudley, the study’s senior author and an associate professor of genetics and genomic sciences at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York. “I think they’re like gas on the flames of some pathology that may be immune-driven.”

If so, that could change the course of research and possibly lead to treatments and new ways of screening for the disease.


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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#62

Post by Addie » Mon Aug 06, 2018 6:37 am

New York Times
'Too Little Too Late': Bankruptcy Booms Among Older Americans

For a rapidly growing share of older Americans, traditional ideas about life in retirement are being upended by a dismal reality: bankruptcy.

The signs of potential trouble — vanishing pensions, soaring medical expenses, inadequate savings — have been building for years. Now, new research sheds light on the scope of the problem: The rate of people 65 and older filing for bankruptcy is three times what it was in 1991, the study found, and the same group accounts for a far greater share of all filers.

Driving the surge, the study suggests, is a three-decade shift of financial risk from government and employers to individuals, who are bearing an ever-greater responsibility for their own financial well-being as the social safety net shrinks.

The transfer has come in the form of, among other things, longer waits for full Social Security benefits, the replacement of employer-provided pensions with 401(k) savings plans and more out-of-pocket spending on health care. Declining incomes, whether in retirement or leading up to it, compound the challenge. ...

As the study, from the Consumer Bankruptcy Project, explains, older people whose finances are precarious have few places to turn. “When the costs of aging are off-loaded onto a population that simply does not have access to adequate resources, something has to give,” the study says, “and older Americans turn to what little is left of the social safety net — bankruptcy court.”


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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#63

Post by Volkonski » Mon Aug 06, 2018 8:46 am

The conductor of the now defunct New York Recorder Orchestra (in which Mrs. V. used to play) and her partner have given up their NoFo home and moved into the Peconic Landing Retirement Complex.

When we got back to the NoFo we learned that a friend from the UU Fellowship had entered hospice. She died a couple of weeks ago.

Mrs. V's early music friend, who visited here a few weeks ago, passed out while feeding her cat. She fell fracturing a vertebra and ended up in the hospital.

Another Recorder Orchestra friend has had knee surgery this summer.


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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#64

Post by Addie » Wed Aug 08, 2018 2:56 pm

The Hill OpEd
The Trump administration’s absurd devaluing of cancer care for seniors ...

Starting in 2019, CMS has proposed drastically cutting E&M reimbursement for complex cancer cases by 22 percent for a new patient and 37 percent for existing patients. Oncologists and other specialists aren’t mad about yet another Medicare pay cut – although that does sting – we are insulted that CMS thinks the time and expertise of physicians who treat cancer and other incredibly complex diseases is worthless. Worse yet, this cut is an affront to seniors in the Medicare program who expect, have paid for, and deserve that expertise and time in caring for their complex medical conditions.

CMS Administrator Seema Verma said in a letter to physicians that the proposal will “dramatically reduce the amount of time you have to spend inputting unnecessary information into your patient’s records.” Because of the new proposed pay scheme, physicians would spend less time, “copying, pasting, and clicking.”

Is that what she thinks we do all day? ...

After receiving this devastating news most patients, like Mrs. Simpson, will call their oncologists back with a number of additional questions. Of course, we take those calls, answer the questions, and explain how we will best manage and face this cancer together.

The Trump administration now wants to completely devalue my expertise and time, giving the treatment of a complex case of cancer the same value as a case of the sniffles. It is simply ludicrous.

What is especially perplexing is that the proposal comes at a time when CMS wants to move physicians towards “value-based” models of health care, such as with the ongoing Oncology Care Model (OCM). A mainstay of these “quality” reforms is encouraging physicians to spend more time managing complex patients, not less. But the message we are getting from CMS’ E&M cut is that they are more interested in the quantity of patient care, not the quality of patient care.


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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#65

Post by Addie » Thu Aug 09, 2018 12:59 pm

Ooh, could be bad news for old feet :geezerette:
CBS News: Crocs to close remaining manufacturing facilities; executive to resign
Adding Update: :thumbs:
CBS News: Crocs closing owned manufacturing facilities but not going out of business, company said

The company issued a statement Thursday afternoon rebutting rumors that it was shutting down.

"[T]here have been multiple media reports that Crocs is winding down production in our owned manufacturing facilities," the statement said, in part. "While accurate, some people have interpreted that to mean that Crocs will no longer be making and selling shoes. Quite the contrary, Crocs will continue to innovate, design and produce the most comfortable shoes on the planet. As we streamline our business to meet growing demand for Crocs, we're simply shifting production to third parties to increase our manufacturing capacity."


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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#66

Post by Volkonski » Sun Aug 12, 2018 4:53 pm

Mrs. V. and I are going up to New England for a few days to visit my cousin in MA and Mrs. V's sister in ME.

Just got a text from my cousin. She has snapped a tendon in her shoulder. Looks like we may spend the visit with her in medical facilities. :(

At least she can still text. ;)


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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#67

Post by Addie » Sun Aug 12, 2018 6:50 pm

HealthDay News
Eye Disease Link to Alzheimer's Seen

SUNDAY, Aug. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have discovered a link between three degenerative eye diseases and Alzheimer's disease.

They say their findings could lead to new ways to identify people at high risk for Alzheimer's.

"We don't mean people with these eye conditions will get Alzheimer's disease," said lead researcher Cecilia Lee, an assistant professor of ophthalmology at the University of Washington School of Medicine.

"The main message from this study is that ophthalmologists should be more aware of the risks of developing dementia for people with these eye conditions and primary care doctors seeing patients with these eye conditions might be more careful on checking on possible dementia or memory loss," Lee explained in a university news release.

The study involved 3,877 randomly selected patients, aged 65 and older. They were tracked over the course of five years, during which time 792 were diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease.

Patients with age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy or glaucoma had a 40 to 50 percent greater risk of Alzheimer's disease than those without the eye conditions, the researchers said.


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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#68

Post by kate520 » Sun Aug 12, 2018 6:52 pm

Remind me again, what’s good for keeping glaucoma at bay? :mrgreen: /rhetorical


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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#69

Post by qbawl » Sun Aug 12, 2018 7:34 pm

Well isn't that special‽ Looks like I'm rockin the trifecta!



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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#70

Post by Volkonski » Mon Aug 13, 2018 12:17 pm

My cousin will see the doctor this afternoon and our dinner plans are still on. :thumbs:
Volkonski wrote:
Sun Aug 12, 2018 4:53 pm
Mrs. V. and I are going up to New England for a few days to visit my cousin in MA and Mrs. V's sister in ME.

Just got a text from my cousin. She has snapped a tendon in her shoulder. Looks like we may spend the visit with her in medical facilities. :(

At least she can still text. ;)


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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#71

Post by Addie » Sat Aug 25, 2018 5:28 pm

Futurity.org - You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4.0 International license.
Simple eye exam may detect Alzheimer's disease early

It may be possible in the future to screen patients for Alzheimer’s disease using a simple eye exam, according to new research.

Using technology similar to what is found in eye doctors’ offices, researchers have detected evidence indicating Alzheimer’s disease in older patients who had no symptoms.

“This technique has great potential to become a screening tool that helps decide who should undergo more expensive and invasive testing for Alzheimer’s disease prior to the appearance of clinical symptoms,” says first author Bliss E. O’Bryhim, a resident physician in the ophthalmology & visual sciences department at Washington University in St. Louis.

“Our hope is to use this technique to understand who is accumulating abnormal proteins in the brain that may lead them to develop Alzheimer’s.”
Hear co-principal investigator Gregory Van Stavern discuss the findings:

Thinning retina

Significant brain damage from Alzheimer’s disease can occur years before any symptoms such as memory loss and cognitive decline appear. Scientists estimate that Alzheimer’s-related plaques can build up in the brain two decades before the onset of symptoms, so researchers have been looking for ways to detect the disease sooner.

Physicians now use PET scans and lumbar punctures to help diagnose Alzheimer’s disease, but they are expensive and invasive.

In previous studies, researchers reported that the eyes of patients who had died from Alzheimer’s disease showed signs of thinning in the center of the retina and degradation of the optic nerve.

In the new study, which appears in JAMA Ophthalmology, researchers used a noninvasive technique—called optical coherence tomography angiography—to examine the retinas in eyes of 30 study participants with an average age in the mid-70s, none of whom exhibited clinical symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease.

Participants were patients in the Memory and Aging Project at Washington University’s Knight Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center. About half of those in the study had elevated levels of the Alzheimer’s proteins amyloid or tau as revealed by PET scans or cerebrospinal fluid, suggesting that although they didn’t have symptoms, they likely would develop the disease. In the other subjects, PET scans and cerebrospinal fluid analyses were normal.

“In the patients with elevated levels of amyloid or tau, we detected significant thinning in the center of the retina,” says co-principal investigator Rajendra S. Apte, distinguished professor of ophthalmology and visual sciences.

“All of us have a small area devoid of blood vessels in the center of our retinas that is responsible for our most precise vision. We found that this zone lacking blood vessels was significantly enlarged in people with preclinical Alzheimer’s disease,” Apte says.

The eye test researchers used in the study shines light into the eye, allowing a doctor to measure retinal thickness, as well as the thickness of fibers in the optic nerve. A form of that test often is available in ophthalmologist’s offices.

For the current study, however, researchers added a new component to the more common test: angiography, which allows doctors to distinguish red blood cells from other tissue in the retina.

“The angiography component allows us to look at blood-flow patterns,” says Gregory P. Van Stavern, professor of ophthalmology and visual sciences. “In the patients whose PET scans and cerebrospinal fluid showed preclinical Alzheimer’s, the area at the center of the retina without blood vessels was significantly larger, suggesting less blood flow.”

“The retina and central nervous system are so interconnected that changes in the brain could be reflected in cells in the retina,” Apte adds.
‘Nanoscope’ zooms in to see Alzheimer’s plaques

Of the patients studied, 17 had abnormal PET scans and/or lumbar punctures, and all of them also had retinal thinning and significant areas without blood vessels in the centers of their retinas. The retinas appeared normal in the patients whose PET scans and lumbar punctures were within the typical range.

More studies in patients are needed to replicate the findings, Van Stavern says, noting that if changes detected with this eye test can serve as markers for Alzheimer’s risk, it may be possible one day to screen people as young as their 40s or 50s to see whether they are at risk for the disease.

“We know the pathology of Alzheimer’s disease starts to develop years before symptoms appear, but if we could use this eye test to notice when the pathology is beginning, it may be possible one day to start treatments sooner to delay further damage.”


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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#72

Post by MRich » Sun Aug 26, 2018 4:13 pm

A couple months ago I posted about my father having memory issues. (He's the one that asked if he should go to the bank to get some traveler's checks for a trip for his brother-in-law's funeral. http://www.thefogbow.com/forum/viewtopi ... 06#p981606 if you're interested.) Here's an update - I know it's a lot but it feels good to share this even if nobody reads it.

Well, on the trip he exhibited short term memory issues - I had to show him several times how to use the key card for their hotel room, so I got a copy for me. And he kept forgetting where and when the various funeral functions were. But he never acted weird, and he really didn't act confused, frustrated or mean; he just kept asking the same questions over and over.

After we got home from the funeral, I told my mother he needed to be tested (as several Fogbow members suggested). She insisted he was all right, just a little forgetful. So I talked to my dad, told him I was concerned, and maybe he should mention it to his doctor.

My dad is the stereotypical male patient who never tells the doctor the whole truth (I have to admit I'm the same way), so imagine my surprise when he DID talk to the doctor, who started him on Donepezil (Aricept), which is the same drug my father's 94 year old brother takes - it's a "memory pill" as he describes it. He also scheduled a MRI.

About a month ago, before his scheduled MRI, my dad started experiencing extreme fatigue and tingling in his hands. My mother called me and we took him to the ER, where within 2 hours he had a stent put in! Amazing! It was in the part of the heart which pumps to the lungs. His recovery has been amazing, although he had a really bad reaction to Lipitor (2 trips to the ER to get THAT all straightened out!). He's currently off the Lipitor but is taking blood thinners, BP meds, a beta blocker, and B12. I'm sure this is the normal cocktail they give heart patients. They put him on the Pritikin diet which is low fat, low cholesterol, and he's not cheating much.

His memory actually seems a bit better, but it's still not great. This may be due to his improved blood pressure and blood flow, I suppose. He had the MRI and the results show some hardening of the arteries. I've been accompanying him to all his appointments since the heart attack, and he has an appointment with his regular doctor on Tuesday, so I'm going to make him explain all the results.

The eye test for Alzheimer's early detection sounds pretty interesting. I'm going to read up on that. Alzheimer's scares me to death!



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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#73

Post by kate520 » Sun Aug 26, 2018 4:30 pm

Thanks for the update, mrich. I think we all have gone or will go thru the parent care era of our lives, so it’s more than of passing interest to me. It’s good to hear others’ experiences and perhaps compare. For our family, it was drug interactions that caused cognitive issues in hub’s mom. Once those were straightened out she was much happier, and better.


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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#74

Post by AndyinPA » Sun Aug 26, 2018 4:47 pm

I'm sorry to hear about your dad. I hope it can be determined exactly what's wrong and he gets the help he needs. I've done the older parenting thing and I know how rough it can be. Good luck.



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Re: Aging - it's not for fraidy cats

#75

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Sun Aug 26, 2018 9:33 pm

AndyinPA wrote:
Sun Aug 26, 2018 4:47 pm
I'm sorry to hear about your dad. I hope it can be determined exactly what's wrong and he gets the help he needs. I've done the older parenting thing and I know how rough it can be. Good luck.
My mom lived with us several times after back and foot surgeries. The memory issue is one definitely to monitor. :bighug:


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