Robot Replacement of Human Workers

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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#101

Post by Volkonski » Wed Dec 26, 2018 3:09 pm

One Giant Step for a Chess-Playing Machine

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/26/scie ... &smtyp=cur
All of that has changed with the rise of machine learning. By playing against itself and updating its neural network as it learned from experience, AlphaZero discovered the principles of chess on its own and quickly became the best player ever. Not only could it have easily defeated all the strongest human masters — it didn’t even bother to try — it crushed Stockfish, the reigning computer world champion of chess. In a hundred-game match against a truly formidable engine, AlphaZero scored twenty-eight wins and seventy-two draws. It didn’t lose a single game.

Most unnerving was that AlphaZero seemed to express insight. It played like no computer ever has, intuitively and beautifully, with a romantic, attacking style. It played gambits and took risks. In some games it paralyzed Stockfish and toyed with it. While conducting its attack in Game 10, AlphaZero retreated its queen back into the corner of the board on its own side, far from Stockfish’s king, not normally where an attacking queen should be placed.

Yet this peculiar retreat was venomous: No matter how Stockfish replied, it was doomed. It was almost as if AlphaZero was waiting for Stockfish to realize, after billions of brutish calculations, how hopeless its position truly was, so that the beast could relax and expire peacefully, like a vanquished bull before a matador. Grandmasters had never seen anything like it. AlphaZero had the finesse of a virtuoso and the power of a machine. It was humankind’s first glimpse of an awesome new kind of intelligence.

:snippity:

The other article concerned a machine-learning algorithm that decides whether a CT scan of an emergency-room patient shows signs of a stroke, an intracranial hemorrhage or other critical neurological event. For stroke victims, every minute matters; the longer treatment is delayed, the worse the outcome tends to be. (Neurologists have a grim saying: “Time is brain.”) The new algorithm flagged these and other critical events with an accuracy comparable to human experts — but it did so 150 times faster. A faster diagnostician could allow the most urgent cases to be triaged sooner, with review by a human radiologist.
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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#102

Post by Addie » Tue Jan 15, 2019 10:36 am

WaPo
Giant Food Stores will place robotic assistants at 172 locations, company says

He goes by the name “Marty.”

Tall, slow-moving and gray, he has big cartoonish eyes that disguise something unique about the newest employee at Giant Food Stores: Marty is deliberate and relentless, and — unlike his fellow employees — he has the ability to work a seemingly endless number of hours without pay.

Though he doesn’t say much, a small message is always plastered to his slender trunk:

“This store is monitored by Marty for your safety,” it reads. “Marty is an autonomous robot that uses image capturing technology to report spills, debris and other potential hazards to store employees to improve your shopping experience.”

After a pilot program that kicked off in several Pennsylvania stores this past fall, Giant Food Stores announced Monday that it will place Martys in each of the supermarket chain’s 172 stores across Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia. The robotic rollout is part of a plan by Giant’s parent company, Ahold Delhaize USA, to deploy about 500 robots to stores such as Giant, Martin’s and Stop & Shop. The robots will begin arriving “in waves” over the coming months, according to Giant, which expects to have the devices fully deployed in about six months. ...

Giant isn’t the only retailer turning to robots to police its many aisles. In December, Walmart announced plans to place 360 autonomous robots inside stores across the country by the end of January.

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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#103

Post by Whatever4 » Tue Jan 15, 2019 12:37 pm

I’d trip over the robot.
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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#104

Post by DejaMoo » Wed Jan 16, 2019 9:23 am

Japan’s robot hotel lays off half the robots after they created more work for humans
It turns out that even robots are having a tough time holding down a job. Japan’s Henn-na “Strange” Hotel has laid off half its 243 robots after they created more problems than they could solve, as first reported by The Wall Street Journal.

One of the layoffs included a doll-shaped assistant in each hotel room called Churi. Siri, Google Assistant, and Alexa can answer questions about local businesses’ opening and closing times, but Churi couldn’t. When hotel guests asked Churi “What time does the theme park open?” it didn’t have a good answer. That was a problem because Churi was supposed to help ameliorate the Strange Hotel’s staff shortage by substituting in for human workers.

Others on the chopping block:

Two velociraptor robots positioned at check-in were also decommissioned because human workers essentially had to do their jobs for them and photocopy guests’ passports manually.

Two robot luggage carriers could only reach about 24 of the over 100 rooms in the hotel and failed in rain or snow. They would also often get stuck trying to pass by each other.

The hotel’s main concierge robot also didn’t know how to answer questions about flight schedules and nearby tourist attractions. It has since been replaced by a human.
I've heard this bull before.

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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#105

Post by neonzx » Wed Jan 16, 2019 9:43 am

DejaMoo wrote:
Wed Jan 16, 2019 9:23 am
Japan’s robot hotel lays off half the robots after they created more work for humans
It turns out that even robots are having a tough time holding down a job. Japan’s Henn-na “Strange” Hotel has laid off half its 243 robots after they created more problems than they could solve, as first reported by The Wall Street Journal.

Two velociraptor robots positioned at check-in were also decommissioned because human workers essentially had to do their jobs for them and photocopy guests’ passports manually.
:shock:
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To which Trump replied, Fuck the law. I don't give a fuck about the law. I want my fucking money.

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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#106

Post by Volkonski » Thu Jan 31, 2019 5:13 pm

How a medical assistance robot named 'Moxi' is helping UTMB Galveston nurses

https://www.chron.com/neighborhood/baya ... =sftwitter
Created by Texas-based company Diligent Robotics, the "socially intelligent healthcare service robot," as described on the company's website, is designed to help nurses with logistical tasks like delivering linens, admission supplies and lab samples. Moxi started at the Jennie Sealy Hospital at UTMB Galveston Jan. 21.

:snippity:

"She is also helping keep [the] drawers outside patient rooms stocked with essential items for the nurses - like gauze, band-aids, things like that," Thomas said. "We are working on rolling out more tasks as we figure out what the nurses need to deliver patient care."

As described on the Diligent Robotics website, the all-white, sleek looking robot is designed with a "flexible arm and precise gripper" and situated atop a mobile base that "allow it to quickly and efficiently execute end-to-end tasks." Sensors allow the robot to navigate spaces throughout the hospital, and bright blue LED eyes help give it some personality.

"A lot of people compare her to Rosie from the Jetson's," Thomas said. "They love her, she makes these heart eyes which people think is really funny."
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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#107

Post by Volkonski » Tue Mar 26, 2019 2:48 pm

The good news- a new garment factory is opening. The bad news- all the sewing is done by robots.

Sewing robots set to bring jobs to Little Rock, fight foreign labor

https://www.arkansasonline.com/news/201 ... s-to-lr-f/
The idea behind one textile manufacturing plant of the future was dreamed up in a one-story industrial building on Atlanta's west side. Twenty-four "Sewbots" will soon churn out a shirt about every 30 seconds in a new factory in Arkansas.

The fully automated assembly line in Little Rock is a closely watched advance in the U.S. textile industry, as machines produce more clothing.

Suzhou Tian Yuan Garments Co., the Chinese owner of the new Arkansas plant, has cheap reliable power, proximity to cotton and well-off customers. And it opens the way for American-made robots to compete with low-cost foreign labor, the Atlanta newspaper reported.

The Arkansas plant is expected to open later this year and employ 400 workers. Many of the positions are for technicians with coding and electro-mechanical knowledge.
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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#108

Post by RTH10260 » Tue Mar 26, 2019 5:31 pm

Time to retrain those coal miners..... :twisted:

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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#109

Post by RTH10260 » Tue Mar 26, 2019 5:45 pm

uploaded August 2013


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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#110

Post by Volkonski » Wed Mar 27, 2019 1:55 pm

How McDonald's will ask "You want fries with that?" in the near future. :o

McDonald's Is Buying a Decision-Logic Tech Company to Personalize Your Drive-Thru Experience

http://fortune.com/2019/03/26/mcdonalds ... rive-thru/
The world’s biggest restaurant chain is spending more than $300 million on Dynamic Yield Ltd., according to a person familiar with the matter. With the new technology, McDonald’s restaurants can vary their electronic menu boards’ display of items, depending on factors such as the weather—more coffee on cold days and McFlurries on hot days, for example—and the time of day or regional preferences. The menus will also suggest add-on items to customers.

Since taking the helm in 2015, Chief Executive Officer Steve Easterbrook has pushed technology—including self-order kiosks, digital menus boards and delivery— to boost sales and help McDonald’s stand out among rivals. Since McDonald’s seldom carries out acquisitions, the purchase of Dynamic Yield shows the company’s desire to leverage technology to speed growth in the fiercely competitive restaurant industry.

“Technology is a critical element of our velocity growth plan,” Easterbrook said in a statement. He said McDonald’s is expanding the role that technology will play in McDonald’s future “and the speed with which we’ll be able to implement our vision of creating more personalized experiences for our customers.”

:snippity:

With the agreement, McDonald’s becomes the sole owner of Dynamic Yield, which is based in New York and Tel Aviv. The 38,000-store burger chain will continue to invest in Dynamic Yield, which will remain a standalone company. Dynamic Yield’s website says customers have included Urban Outfitters Inc., Ikea and HelloFresh.
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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#111

Post by RTH10260 » Fri Mar 29, 2019 10:21 pm

Boston Dynamics with their next warehouse handling robot

If it looks like a duck, swims like a duck, and quacks like a duck, then...


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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#112

Post by Whatever4 » Sat Mar 30, 2019 11:56 pm

I used to employ the person the one on the back is replacing. Put the box ON the conveyer, not 12 inches ABOVE the conveyer. Damn robot does the same job exactly the same way.
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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#113

Post by RTH10260 » Sun Mar 31, 2019 1:38 am

Apprentice Show - Robots Edition

Programmer! You are fired!


:)

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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#114

Post by Volkonski » Wed Apr 03, 2019 12:46 pm

Now the robots are taking jobs from dogs.
NBC News

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Robotic pets may be the next big thing in dementia care. https://nbcnews.to/2UghUDC - @NBCNewsMACH
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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#115

Post by RTH10260 » Wed Apr 03, 2019 1:13 pm

Volkonski wrote:
Wed Apr 03, 2019 12:46 pm
Now the robots are taking jobs from dogs.
NBC News @NBCNews

Robotic pets may be the next big thing in dementia care. https://nbcnews.to/2UghUDC - @NBCNewsMACH
Image
While some may consider cheating a senior to be cruel, a dement person lacks the ability to properly care for a real dog. Carers needs to look for both the patient and the assigned pet while their time is restricted. I guess in this case I am in favour of a robotic supplement.

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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#116

Post by DejaMoo » Wed Apr 03, 2019 1:21 pm

Volkonski wrote:
Wed Apr 03, 2019 12:46 pm
Now the robots are taking jobs from dogs.
NBC News

Verified account

@NBCNews
4m4 minutes ago
More
Robotic pets may be the next big thing in dementia care. https://nbcnews.to/2UghUDC - @NBCNewsMACH
Speaking from experience, they won't be widely used. They'll be priced for the commercial market - nursing homes, hospitals - meaning they'll be priced far beyond what the typical family can afford. There are very basic models on the market now that run about a hundred bucks.

This is the problem with a lot of assistive medical devices. There's stuff on the market that would be a godsend to home caregivers, except that it's absurdly unaffordable. Lift chairs are one example. These are devices to help get a person back up after a fall. The simplest ones are fabric air bags that you connect to an inflator. Lay the bag flat on the floor, roll the person onto it, turn on the inflator and it inflates to chair height. Cost: $1200 just for the air bag, $1600 for the bag + inflator. A more sophisticated lift chair is an actual battery-operated chair that dissasembles so you can lay the seat flat on the floor, roll the person onto it, then attach the backrest and support arms, and press the button, whereupon it lifts up into chair position. Cost: $6500.

You can't persuade me that a fabric air bag's cost to manufacture requires the $1200 price. No, it's the targeted market that determines what the manufacturer will charge.
I've heard this bull before.

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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#117

Post by Volkonski » Sun Apr 07, 2019 1:02 pm

The Robots Have Descended on Trump Country

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/13/opin ... -jobs.html
They calculate the job losses resulting from the addition of one robot in a “commuting zone.” Their bottom line: “one more robot in a commuting zone reduces employment by about six workers.”

These job losses are concentrated

"in blue collar occupations such as machinists, assemblers, material handlers and welders. Workers in these occupations engage in tasks that are being automated by industrial robots, so it is natural for them to experience the bulk of the displacement effect created by this technology."

The adverse effects of automation fall disproportionately on the voters who cast most of their ballots for Trump in 2016: White men, much more than women, and whites without college degrees.
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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#118

Post by Foggy » Sun Apr 07, 2019 3:55 pm

Robots are people too, my friends. :bighug:

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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#119

Post by RTH10260 » Sun Apr 07, 2019 5:09 pm

Foggy wrote:
Sun Apr 07, 2019 3:55 pm
Robots are people too, my friends. :bighug:
Yeah - they must be female, they cost money to support, SCOTUS will agree with you and let them vote!

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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#120

Post by Volkonski » Tue Apr 09, 2019 5:34 pm

Walmart doubles down on robots to shift labor costs: "We're going big"

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/robots-in- ... d=65894053
The robots are coming for Walmart workers' jobs, with the retail giant saying it plans to add almost 4,000 robots to its stores and facilities as it seeks to remove human workers from routine tasks like scrubbing floors.

The company said the plan is part of a goal to shift human workers to customer-service roles, such as "engaging with customers," according to a blog post. The new robots include the "Auto-C," which polishes floors, and the FAST Unloader, which scans and sorts items unloaded from delivery trucks.

The investment in automation comes as the retail giant has pledged to boost worker wages, pledging $2.7 billion over two years to boost pay as well as training and education. Robots, while requiring an initial investment, promise lower labor costs because they don't require benefits, while they can often perform the same job in much less time than a human worker. Walmart said the Auto-C will replace a store worker who typically spent two hours polishing floors with a scrubbing machine.

Comparing the robots to sidekicks like R2D2, the company framed the investment as helping workers shift into roles with fewer monotonous, repeatable tasks. Each robot can cut down hours of work done by a human into a few hours, or assign fewer humans to certain jobs, representing potential savings given the retailer's 4,600 stores, the Wall Street Journal noted.
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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#121

Post by Volkonski » Thu Apr 11, 2019 6:11 pm

The Age of Robot Farmers

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2019 ... ot-farmers
Wishnatzki’s is only one of a number of startups that are trying to build a strawberry-picking robot. Among them are a machine that has been developed at Utsunomiya University, in Japan, another by Dogtooth, in the U.K., and a third by Octinion, in Belgium. The Spanish company Agrobot is also testing one. There are prototypes of high-tech orange, grape, and apple harvesters in development as well. A Silicon Valley startup called Blue River Technology created a robotic lettuce-thinner that has been getting a lot of attention from California specialty-crop farmers. (John Deere bought the company in 2017.)

All these prototypes rely on a handful of converging technologies—artificial intelligence, robotics, big data, G.P.S., machine vision, drones, and material science—that have been slowly finding their way onto the farm. Many row-crop farmers in the U.S. employ G.P.S.-guided tractors to lay out their fields. John Deere has been offering G.P.S. for its tractors since 1997. At first, satellite-assisted steering was simply a way for a farmer to keeps his rows straight, rather than rely on a tractor driver’s dead-reckoning skills. But for forward-thinking farmers G.P.S. offers much more than straight lines. A G.P.S.-planted farm provides a foundation on which to build a whole new class of automated farm tools that can use artificial intelligence to solve the hard problems that twentieth-century agricultural automation could not.

:snippity:

o far, Berry 5.1 has cost nearly ten million dollars to develop; Wishnatzki raised most of the money from investors, many of whom were other strawberry growers, including the industry giant Driscoll. “My closest competitors realize we’re all in the same boat,” he told me. His partner, Pitzer, who is forty-nine and previously worked at Intel, helped produce “Battle Bots,” the gladiator-style television show in which warrior robots fight one another. The two men are the co-founders of a tech startup called Harvest croo, which stands for “computerized robotic optimized obtainer.” They hope to have an “alpha” prototype of the harvester ready for commercial use by the end of this year—an ambitious goal. The plan is to lease the machines to farmers for the same amount as or less than they are paying for labor now. This way, in theory, a large capital investment isn’t required of the individual farmers.

:snippity:

The machine was reset, rolled back into the field, and positioned over four rows of strawberry plants, and the demonstration began. Except the robots didn’t begin by touching the plants. Whereas human pickers, who need only a few seconds per bush, use most of that time working their hands through the leaves, each robot, which spends eight seconds per plant, devoted seven and a half of them just to hovering about a foot above the bush, motionless, as though contemplating it. Two stereoscopic cameras per robot, equipped with multi-spectrum and infrared vision that can see berries through the canopy, scanned the plant in a second and a half, and made a virtual 3-D map of it. (If the harvester has encountered the same plant before, it can add this data to what it has already learned about the plant, using a high-speed link to connect with the cloud.) The system then ran all the information through its algorithms and targeted those berries at peak ripeness, based on color, size, and the amount of time that the fruit had already spent on the plant.
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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#122

Post by Volkonski » Wed Apr 17, 2019 12:46 pm

Kroger’s autonomous delivery cars latest salvo in Houston grocery wars

https://www.houstonchronicle.com/busine ... hcpromomod
Kroger, the nation’s largest grocer, has launched a self-driving grocery delivery service in Houston, the latest salvo in a hyper-competitive grocery market that has supermarket chains investing heavily in new technology to win over online shoppers.

Company officials on Tuesday showcased the first of dozens of autonomous delivery vehicles planned for Houston: Toyota Priuses outfitted with cameras, sensors and self-driving computer software. Shoppers at Kroger’s Meyerland store who live in ZIP codes 77401 and 77096 can order groceries through the company’s website and have their purchases pull up in a self-driven Prius. The Cincinnati-based grocer plans to bring the autonomous delivery service to its Buffalo Speedway store later this year, with plans to ultimately expand the program citywide.

:snippity:

In January 2018, Kroger partnered with Nuro, a Mountain View, Calif.-based self-driving delivery startup, to develop a grocery delivery service. Nuro, founded in 2016 by a pair of Google veterans, has raised $1 billion from investors, including Silicon Valley venture capital firm Greylock Partners and Japanese holding conglomerate SoftBank, to make autonomous vehicle deliveries affordable for the mass consumer.

“We believe this technology isn’t just for an elite group of people, but for everybody,” said Dan Mitchell, Nuro’s head of product operations and community engagement.
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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#123

Post by Orlylicious » Sat Jun 15, 2019 3:09 am

This isn't a replacement but wow, check out how Orly might get her next speeding ticket in our Jetsons era :lol:

GoBetween Robotics: A traffic stop robot to keep everyone safe
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Re: Robot Replacement of Human Workers

#124

Post by Volkonski » Thu Jul 04, 2019 11:38 am

Robots could take over 20 million jobs by 2030, experts say

https://www.nbcnews.com/mach/science/ro ... d_nn_tw_ma
According to a new study from Oxford Economics, within the next 11 years there could be 14 million robots put to work in China alone.

Economists analyzed long-term trends around the uptake of automation in the workplace, noting that the number of robots in use worldwide increased threefold over the past two decades to 2.25 million.

While researchers predicted the rise of robots will bring about benefits in terms of productivity and economic growth, they also acknowledged the drawbacks that were expected to arise simultaneously.

“As a result of robotization, tens of millions of jobs will be lost, especially in poorer local economies that rely on lower-skilled workers. This will therefore translate to an increase in income inequality,” the study’s authors said.
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