Coal

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Volkonski
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Re: Coal

#26

Post by Volkonski » Wed Feb 07, 2018 7:14 pm


High Country News

@highcountrynews

Today hundreds of Hopi and Navajo miners marched to oppose the Navajo Generating Station shutdown. Inside the tribes' complicated relationship with the plant:
http://
hcne.ws/2tpsASG
The plant’s operator, Salt River Project (SRP), says natural gas is cleaner and cheaper. For the Navajo Nation, the loss of NGS will trigger a sudden and traumatic bow out from the coal industry while reinforcing a relationship based on exploitation and colonialism.

To SRP and the states of Arizona, California and Nevada, the Navajo Nation is simply a resource that can be used and discarded.

In 2009, SRP approached the Navajo Nation to renew their lease and extend the life of NGS until 2044. A deal was struck, and in 2013, the Navajo council passed the agreement after a grueling six months of debate, special sessions, workshops and other expenditures of time and money. However, SRP never signed the lease, and many Navajos found out when the utility announced that it would decommission the plant by 2019 – a complete reversal of its previous position and clear indication of how little concern the company had for its hosts.

When SRP announced that it would cease operations by the end of the year, it sent the entire Navajo Council scrambling to keep the plant from closing. To avoid the catastrophic shock to the Nation’s annual budget, and the sudden layoff of hundreds of workers, the Council passed a “replacement lease” which will keep the plant running until 2019 and delay its dismantlement until 2022.
The Navajo are between a rock and a hard place.


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gupwalla
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Re: Coal

#27

Post by gupwalla » Wed Feb 07, 2018 8:39 pm

While I sympathize with the plight of the Navajo, the hard cold economics say that coal is dead. Accept that and move your people forward, or reject it and hold your people back.

I say the same for the coal region of WV-OH-PA-KY. Stop dreaming for the world that was and start planning for the world that will be. You're already too late, but maybe you can still make a difference to your people's lives.


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Re: Coal

#28

Post by AndyinPA » Wed Feb 07, 2018 11:28 pm

gupwalla wrote:
Wed Feb 07, 2018 8:39 pm
While I sympathize with the plight of the Navajo, the hard cold economics say that coal is dead. Accept that and move your people forward, or reject it and hold your people back.

I say the same for the coal region of WV-OH-PA-KY. Stop dreaming for the world that was and start planning for the world that will be. You're already too late, but maybe you can still make a difference to your people's lives.
Yes on the last part. There's just something about coal miners that doesn't let them let go. I have a cousin whose dad worked in the mine and he died young of black lung disease. She's still gung-ho on coal. She really bought into 45's promises on coal. She doesn't even live in coal country any more. I've somewhat suspected that it's something about the bonding of miners over the dangers of the jobs that keeps them tied to it. But it's way past time to wake up, though. I understand change is tough, but change happens and you either adapt or get left behind.

Pittsburgh decided to adapt when we lost the steel mills. It can be done and be done well. We've adapted well enough to be in the top 20 list of HQ2 (or whatever they are calling it) for Amazon (I hope we don't get it).



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Danraft
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Re: Coal

#29

Post by Danraft » Thu Feb 08, 2018 2:59 am

D9nt know if this was posted. Came across a comment about new coal subsidies and this it.
A c9ntrived subsidy to solve a non existent problem of power grid fuel shortages.
https://www.theguardian.com/environment ... rick-perry


The Mercury Project

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DejaMoo
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Re: Coal

#30

Post by DejaMoo » Thu Feb 08, 2018 10:35 am

Black Lung Study Finds Biggest Cluster Ever Of Fatal Coal Miners' Disease
Epidemiologists at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health say they've identified the largest cluster of advanced black lung disease ever reported, a cluster that was first uncovered by NPR 14 months ago.

"This is the largest cluster of progressive massive fibrosis ever reported in the scientific literature," says Scott Laney, a NIOSH epidemiologist involved in the study.

"We've gone from having nearly eradicated PMF in the mid-1990s to the highest concentration of cases that anyone has ever seen," he said.

:snippity: "Miners are dying at a much younger age," he says, noting that in the 1990s, the clinic's PMF diagnoses typically involved miners in their 60s, 70s and 80s. Now the disease strikes miners in their 50s, 40s and even 30s with fewer years mining coal.

"A high proportion" of the miners in the NIOSH study had severely advanced disease and "coal mining tenure of less than 20 years, which are indications of exceptionally severe and rapidly progressive disease," the study says.
This is terrible news! In response, I expect the administration will cut funding for tracking and reporting such incidents.


I've heard this bull before.

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RTH10260
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Re: Coal

#31

Post by RTH10260 » Thu Feb 08, 2018 11:35 am

The prior article mentioned in above article indicates further down a suspected cause, mining scarcer resources out of rock than mining pure coal.
Advanced Black Lung Cases Surge In Appalachia

December 15, 2016 6:13 PM ET Howard Berkes

Across Appalachia, coal miners are suffering from the most serious form of the deadly mining disease black lung in numbers more than 10 times what federal regulators report, an NPR investigation has found.

The government, through the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, reported 99 cases of "complicated" black lung, or progressive massive fibrosis, throughout the country the last five years.

But NPR obtained data from 11 black lung clinics in Virginia, West Virginia, Pennsylvania and Ohio, which reported a total of 962 cases so far this decade. The true number is probably even higher, because some clinics had incomplete records and others declined to provide data.


www.npr.org/2016/12/15/505577680/advanc ... appalachia



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Volkonski
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Re: Coal

#32

Post by Volkonski » Thu Mar 01, 2018 1:27 pm


ABC News

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Big blast brings down two giant smokestacks at a Canadian power plant on the shores of Lake Erie in Nanticoke, Ontario.
http://
abcn.ws/2FGKeom

Officials called the demolition "symbolic" of Ontario having eliminated coal-fired electricity.
11:17 PM - Feb 28, 2018


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Volkonski
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Re: Coal

#33

Post by Volkonski » Thu Jul 12, 2018 2:09 pm

UK to pass 1,000 hours without coal as energy shift accelerates

https://www.theguardian.com/business/20 ... CMP=twt_gu
Britain will soon have been powered for more than a thousand hours without coal this year, in a new milestone underscoring how the polluting fuel’s decline is accelerating.

The UK’s last eight coal power plants staged a brief revival when the “beast from the east” pushed up gas prices earlier this year, causing coal plants to fire up.

However, the blip proved short-lived and immaterial, figures compiled by MyGridGB show. The country is expected to pass the threshold of 1,000 coal-free hours before the weekend is out and possibly as early as Thursday night.

The pace of coal power’s demise is speeding up. Throughout the whole of 2017 there were 624 coal-free hours, up from 210 hours in 2016.


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RTH10260
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Re: Coal

#34

Post by RTH10260 » Thu Jul 12, 2018 5:06 pm

Volkonski wrote:
Thu Jul 12, 2018 2:09 pm
UK to pass 1,000 hours without coal as energy shift accelerates

https://www.theguardian.com/business/20 ... CMP=twt_gu
Britain will soon have been powered for more than a thousand hours without coal this year, in a new milestone underscoring how the polluting fuel’s decline is accelerating.

The UK’s last eight coal power plants staged a brief revival when the “beast from the east” pushed up gas prices earlier this year, causing coal plants to fire up.

However, the blip proved short-lived and immaterial, figures compiled by MyGridGB show. The country is expected to pass the threshold of 1,000 coal-free hours before the weekend is out and possibly as early as Thursday night.

The pace of coal power’s demise is speeding up. Throughout the whole of 2017 there were 624 coal-free hours, up from 210 hours in 2016.
OMFSM - how will dotus put down Ms. May over this ?:? :doh: :think:



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Re: Coal

#35

Post by Volkonski » Mon Dec 31, 2018 1:21 pm

Trump seems to have failed to increase coal usage.

Miners Cut Back in Largest U.S. Coal Region

https://www.wsj.com/articles/miners-cut ... 1546264800
Miners in the nation’s largest coal-producing region are leaving more of the fossil fuel in the ground as prices fall for alternatives, including natural gas, and demand erodes from power-generation customers.

Coal production from the Powder River Basin, an arid region spread over parts of Wyoming and Montana that produces about 40% of all U.S. coal, has declined by one-third between 2008 and 2017. It is expected to continue to drop in 2019. That has prompted many mining companies in the region to cut staff or benefits,


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RTH10260
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Re: Coal

#36

Post by RTH10260 » Mon Dec 31, 2018 8:45 pm

Volkonski wrote:
Mon Dec 31, 2018 1:21 pm
Trump seems to have failed to increase coal usage.

Miners Cut Back in Largest U.S. Coal Region

https://www.wsj.com/articles/miners-cut ... 1546264800
Miners in the nation’s largest coal-producing region are leaving more of the fossil fuel in the ground as prices fall for alternatives, including natural gas, and demand erodes from power-generation customers.

Coal production from the Powder River Basin, an arid region spread over parts of Wyoming and Montana that produces about 40% of all U.S. coal, has declined by one-third between 2008 and 2017. It is expected to continue to drop in 2019. That has prompted many mining companies in the region to cut staff or benefits,
Strategic decisions on coal use have been made by the companies long before DJT poped up on the political scence as a presidential candidate. dotus never developed any long term policy in support of coal. He only presented over and over his coal miner support, not addressing potential coal consumers. Just cutting back on some environmental restrictions does not make coal mining per se a lucrative business.



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Volkonski
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Re: Coal

#37

Post by Volkonski » Mon Jan 07, 2019 4:12 pm

Trump fail.

More coal-fired power plants have closed under Trump than in Obama's first term

https://www.cnn.com/2019/01/07/politics ... index.html
But thanks largely to free-market forces, more coal-fired power plants have been deactivated in Trump's first two years in office then in Obama's entire first term. When asked about the President's claim to be the savior of coal, veteran miner and industry consultant Art Sullivan bristles.

"He's trying to get their votes," he says, standing by the fenced-off entrance to a mine not far from Mitchell where he once served as Face Boss, a coal industry term for managers. "He's lying to them."

:snippity:

"They wanted hope," Blair Zimmerman says of his fellow miners in Greene County, Pennsylvania, who put their faith in Trump. "If someone that has a sickness or a cancer and the doctor says 'I can cure that,' they believe ... I can't blame them or question them for trusting (Trump)."

Now a county commissioner, Zimmerman is part of a local group hoping to lure natural gas investors from Texas to drill in Pennsylvania and he scoffs at the Trump administration's efforts to deregulate coal-fired power plants. "It will help this much," he says, holding his fingers an inch apart. "But it won't bring back coal as king."


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tek
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Re: Coal

#38

Post by tek » Mon Jan 07, 2019 4:59 pm

Volkonski wrote:
Mon Jan 07, 2019 4:12 pm
More coal-fired power plants have closed under Trump than in Obama's first term
Nobody could have predicted this!
(anybody with an IQ above room temperature could have predicted this)


A truckload of bricks
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Slim Cognito
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Re: Coal

#39

Post by Slim Cognito » Mon Jan 07, 2019 5:33 pm

tek wrote:
Mon Jan 07, 2019 4:59 pm
Volkonski wrote:
Mon Jan 07, 2019 4:12 pm
More coal-fired power plants have closed under Trump than in Obama's first term
Nobody could have predicted this!
(anybody with an IQ above room temperature could have predicted this)
I expect an upcoming tweet or statement, "Nobody knew the need for coal was diminishing."


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Volkonski
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Re: Coal

#40

Post by Volkonski » Tue Jan 08, 2019 1:50 pm

More Trump fail.

Another Texas power plant is mothballed, raising concerns over reserves and prices

https://www.houstonchronicle.com/busine ... =sftwitter
Gibbons Creek Generating Station, a coal-fired power plant about 20 miles from Bryan near College Station, put the state’s grid operator on notice that the plant will not operate this summer. The closure reduces the state’s already tight power reserves and is sparking forecasts of higher electricity prices.

The Texas Municipal Power Agency, a group comprising the cities of Bryan, Garland, Denton and Greenville, owns the plant and notified the Electric Reliability Council of Texas that it will suspend operations of the 470-megawatt plant through at least the summer. The move follows the shutdown last year of three coal plants with a combined generation capacity of more than 4,000 megawatts — enough to power at least 800,000 Texas homes — by Vistra Energy of Irving.


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Re: Coal

#41

Post by DejaMoo » Tue Jan 08, 2019 4:49 pm

Volkonski wrote:
Tue Jan 08, 2019 1:50 pm
More Trump fail.

Another Texas power plant is mothballed, raising concerns over reserves and prices

https://www.houstonchronicle.com/busine ... =sftwitter
Gibbons Creek Generating Station, a coal-fired power plant about 20 miles from Bryan near College Station, put the state’s grid operator on notice that the plant will not operate this summer. The closure reduces the state’s already tight power reserves and is sparking forecasts of higher electricity prices.
Texas has enough sun and wind to quit coal, Rice researchers say
Texas might have the perfect environment to quit coal for good.

Texas is one of the only places where the natural patterns of wind and sun could produce power around the clock, according to new research from Rice University.

Scientists found that between wind energy from West Texas and the Gulf Coast, and solar energy across the state, Texas could meet a significant portion of its electricity demand from renewable power without extensive battery storage.

“There is no where else in the world better positioned to operate without coal than Texas is,” said Dan Cohan, an associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at Rice University who co-authored the report with a student, Joanna Slusarewicz. “Wind and solar are easily capable of picking up the slack.”


I've heard this bull before.

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Volkonski
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Re: Coal

#42

Post by Volkonski » Sun Jan 27, 2019 8:08 pm

ABC News

Verified account

@ABC
51m51 minutes ago

In a pioneering move, a German government-appointed panel has recommended that Germany stop burning coal to generate electricity by 2038 at the latest, as part of efforts to curb climate change. https://abcn.ws/2DD5ITC


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Re: Coal

#43

Post by Lani » Mon Jan 28, 2019 2:55 am

Our little member owned electric company had planned to provide 70% renewable energy by 2030. However, in 2018 we reached 50+%.

"Overall, KIUC’s renewable portfolio has expanded from 8 percent in 2010 to more than 50 percent at the end of 2018, with a corresponding reduction of 15 million gallons of fossil fuel usage per year."

"We expect the PMRF project to be on line by the end of this year, and that will bring us well over 60 percent renewable. Our strategic goal is 70 percent renewable by 2030: We’ll be substantially there a full ten years early."


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Re: Coal

#44

Post by Sluffy1 » Mon Jan 28, 2019 4:43 am

Black Lung aka Pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis (Longest word in English)
Due to the length of the word it is often abbreviated by language buffs to p45 (i.e. 45 characters). Pneumoconiosis is also a simplified medical description of the condition, and the UK public at large know it as black lung or silicosis.



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Re: Coal

#45

Post by Sam the Centipede » Mon Jan 28, 2019 7:34 am

Sluffy1 wrote:
Mon Jan 28, 2019 4:43 am
Black Lung aka Pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis (Longest word in English)
Due to the length of the word it is often abbreviated by language buffs to p45 (i.e. 45 characters). Pneumoconiosis is also a simplified medical description of the condition, and the UK public at large know it as black lung or silicosis.
Mm. I suspect that's a made-up word. Pneumoconiosis is a well-known term for diseases (the -osis bit) caused by retention of dust (the -coni- bit) in the lungs (the pneumo- bit). The -ultramicroscopic- bit sounds completely phoney and irrelevant because a real term would just have -micro- for small, the -scop- bit makes little sense and the grammatical form is wrong. I might have heard of pneumosilicosis as a more specific term for silica dust in the lungs but I'm not sure about that; it's always been silicosis in reports I have read. Similarly asbestosis for asbestos-related forms of pneumoconiosis. The long alleged word probably comes from the same people who like to invent (or claim as standard) nonsensical collective terms for different animals.

Anyway, if you want a longer word, stick hyper- on the front to express an extreme form of the disease!



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Re: Coal

#46

Post by RTH10260 » Mon Jan 28, 2019 8:11 am

Volkonski wrote:
Sun Jan 27, 2019 8:08 pm
ABC News @ABC

In a pioneering move, a German government-appointed panel has recommended that Germany stop burning coal to generate electricity by 2038 at the latest, as part of efforts to curb climate change. https://abcn.ws/2DD5ITC
In December the last working underground coal mining operation in Germany was closed down. Strip mining is still happening, but recently a deforesting operation to prepare for extension of a mine was put on hold by a judge. Germany imports Chinese coal, even with the long shipping it is cheaper than locally produced coal.



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Slim Cognito
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Re: Coal

#47

Post by Slim Cognito » Mon Jan 28, 2019 8:53 am

Sam the Centipede wrote:
Mon Jan 28, 2019 7:34 am
Sluffy1 wrote:
Mon Jan 28, 2019 4:43 am
Black Lung aka Pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis (Longest word in English)
Due to the length of the word it is often abbreviated by language buffs to p45 (i.e. 45 characters). Pneumoconiosis is also a simplified medical description of the condition, and the UK public at large know it as black lung or silicosis.
Mm. I suspect that's a made-up word. Pneumoconiosis is a well-known term for diseases (the -osis bit) caused by retention of dust (the -coni- bit) in the lungs (the pneumo- bit). The -ultramicroscopic- bit sounds completely phoney and irrelevant because a real term would just have -micro- for small, the -scop- bit makes little sense and the grammatical form is wrong. I might have heard of pneumosilicosis as a more specific term for silica dust in the lungs but I'm not sure about that; it's always been silicosis in reports I have read. Similarly asbestosis for asbestos-related forms of pneumoconiosis. The long alleged word probably comes from the same people who like to invent (or claim as standard) nonsensical collective terms for different animals.

Anyway, if you want a longer word, stick hyper- on the front to express an extreme form of the disease!
I'm hypersuspicous, as well. Didn't bother to research it, but I did medical transcription for decades and the "ultramicroscopic" set off a warning bell to me. To me it means looking at very small stuff. There's no reason to put that in the diagnosis. Maybe under the diagnostic studies (with "maybe" doing a lot of work here) but not the actual diagnosis.


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Volkonski
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Re: Coal

#48

Post by Volkonski » Wed Feb 06, 2019 4:01 pm

⚡Taylor Kuykendall

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@taykuy
Follow Follow @taykuy
More
NEW: Peabody targeting lower 2019 US coal volumes due to lower domestic demand.
- Reducing production of higher-cost coal at North Antelope Rochelle in Wyoming by 10M tons.
- Largest coal mine in U.S., it produced 98.3M tons in '18. In 2017, NARM mined 13% of ALL U.S. coal.

8:40 AM - 6 Feb 2019


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Slim Cognito
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Re: Coal

#49

Post by Slim Cognito » Wed Feb 06, 2019 4:36 pm

How dare Hillary Clinton suggest coal miners be retrained. They really raked her over the (ahem) coals for that. Wonder if any of them are rethinking the issue.


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Re: Coal

#50

Post by AndyinPA » Wed Feb 06, 2019 4:51 pm

Probably not in coal country. I had relatives when I was a kid who were in coal mining. They are a tight bunch, even many years later. Even though my cousin's dad died fairly young from black lung disease, she and her family still think coal mining should be making a comeback.



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