Water Troubles

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Re: Water Troubles

#301

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Tue Jun 12, 2018 5:13 pm

https://news.nationalgeographic.com/201 ... n-culture/?
How India’s Fishermen Turn Ocean Plastic Into Roads

Since August last year, he and nearly 5,000 other fishermen and boat owners in Kollam—a fishing town of 400,000 in India’s southernmost state, Kerala—have been hauling back to land all the plastic that they find while they’re out at sea. With help from several government agencies, they’ve also set up the first-ever recycling center in the region, to clean, sort, and process all the sea-tossed plastic bags, bottles, straws, flip-flops, and drowned Barbies that they fish out. So far, they’ve collected about 65 metric tons (71 short tons) of plastic waste. (Learn more about the plastic pollution crisis.)

Last summer, Mathias approached J. Mercykutty Amma, the state minister of fisheries, and a fellow Kollam native, for help. “I said, if we take it upon ourselves to collect plastic from the sea and bring it back to land, can you help us do something with it?” he says.

She said sure, but she probably couldn’t make it happen on her own. So, about a month later, she roped in five other government agencies, including the department of civil engineers, who agreed to help build a recycling facility, and the department for women’s empowerment. That agency is tasked with improving employment opportunities for women, in an area where many fields, like fishing, had long been dominated by men. So the agency helped hire an all-female crew to work there.

For the past several months, a group of 30 women have been working full time to painstakingly wash and sort plastic that the fishermen collect. Most of it is too damaged and eroded to recycle in traditional ways. Instead, it’s shredded into a fine confetti and sold to local construction crews who use it to strengthen asphalt for paving roads. The proceeds—along with government grant money—cover the women’s salaries, about 350 rupees ($5) per day. The system isn’t completely self sufficient, but it will be by next year, Mathias hopes.


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Re: Water Troubles

#302

Post by Volkonski » Mon Jun 18, 2018 11:20 am

Deadly Tensions Rise as India’s Water Supply Runs Dangerously Low

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/17/worl ... water.html
A government report released on Thursday said that India was experiencing the worst water crisis in its history, threatening millions of lives and livelihoods. Some 600 million Indians, about half the population, face high to extreme water scarcity conditions, with about 200,000 dying every year from inadequate access to safe water, according to the report. By 2030, it said, the country’s demand for water is likely to be twice the available supply.

:snippity:

And many of the country’s cities have outdated water distribution systems, said Rajendra Singh, founder and chairman of Tarun Bharat Sangh, a conservation group. India has also fallen short on conservation measures like capturing rainfall and snowmelt, he said.

“There are around 90 cities in India which are water stressed. They face crisis today, tomorrow and the day after,” Mr. Singh said. “Shimla got more media attention, but many areas are facing water scarcity.”

That includes the capital, New Delhi. This year, in the city’s chronically water-deprived neighborhood of Wazirpur, a father and son died after a scuffle broke out among people waiting in line for a tanker.
http://www.niti.gov.in/writereaddata/fi ... t_vS6B.pdf


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Re: Water Troubles

#303

Post by TollandRCR » Mon Jun 18, 2018 5:56 pm

India faces two different kinds of water problems. One concerns the quantity of available water. Water supply systems have not kept pace with urbanization and population growth. The systems are not resilient in times of drought. They are often defective.

The second problem is the quality of water. A conservative estimate is that 21% of communicable duseases in India are water-borne diseases. Perhaps 500 children die each day in India from diarrhea. https://water.org/our-impact/india/. We tend to think of diarrhea as a great inconvenience but not a deadly threat. It is a deadly threat in India.

The problems are interconnected. Water quality would he hugher if there were a steadier supply of fresh water.

In addition, major firms (some Western) are buying rights to springs that have served villages for millennia. The companies are right: their bottled spring water may be safer. The cost is out of the range of India's poor.

I think water is the most important health issue of this century.


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Re: Water Troubles

#304

Post by Somerset » Mon Jun 18, 2018 6:05 pm

TollandRCR wrote:
Mon Jun 18, 2018 5:56 pm


I think water is the most important health issue of this century.
I agree.

I had water go out periodically in China, to the point that I kept a 25 liter bucket of water around so I could flush the toilet and clean myself. You quickly realize how important clean running water is to hygiene and health.



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Re: Water Troubles

#305

Post by Addie » Mon Jun 18, 2018 6:39 pm

Grist
Rising seas could wipe out $1 trillion worth of U.S. homes and businesses

Some 2.4 million American homes and businesses worth more than $1 trillion are at risk of “chronic inundation” by the end of the century, according to a report out Monday. That’s about 15 percent of all U.S. coastal real estate, or roughly as much built infrastructure as Houston and Los Angeles combined.

The sweeping new study from the Union of Concerned Scientists is the most comprehensive analysis of the risks posed by sea level rise to the United States coastal economy. Taken in context with the lack of action to match the scale of the problem, it describes a country plowing headlong into a flood-driven financial crisis of enormous scale.

“In contrast with previous housing market crashes, values of properties chronically inundated due to sea level rise are unlikely to recover and will only continue to go further underwater, literally and figuratively,” said Rachel Cleetus, an economist at the Union of Concerned Scientists, and a report co-author, in a statement. “Many coastal communities will face declining property values as risk perceptions catch up with reality.”

The report defines chronic inundation as 26 flood events per year, or roughly one every other week — enough to “make normal routines impossible” and render the properties essentially worthless. It builds on the group’s previous work to identify the risk of chronic flooding under a sea-level-rise scenario of two meters (6.6 feet) by 2100. Using data from Zillow for every property in every coastal zip code in the lower 48, the results of this week’s report are at once familiar and surprising. (Here’s the interactive map where you can plug in your zip code).


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Re: Water Troubles

#306

Post by Addie » Sat Jun 30, 2018 11:55 am

Arizona Daily Star
Risks to Lake Mead, Colorado River intensifying greatly, federal officials say

TEMPE — The risks of Lake Mead dropping to catastrophically low levels have ramped up dramatically, say federal officials who came here Thursday to push for completion of a long-stalled drought plan for the Colorado River Basin.

At a presentation before hundreds of local and state officials, Bureau of Reclamation Commissioner Brenda Burman and a top aide warned that the risks to the lake are unacceptable. They said it’s urgent that Arizona officials resolve their differences over the drought plan and get on board with six other Colorado River Basin states that are moving toward adopting one.

Since the seven states approved a set of guidelines for managing the river’s reservoirs in 2007, the risks of Lake Mead dropping to very low levels has increased by three to six times, the bureau officials said.

They spoke at a briefing that also found once-warring Arizona Department of Water Resources and Central Arizona Project officials moving closer together on issues that had split them apart for well over a year. Both ADWR chief Tom Buschatzke and CAP general manager Ted Cooke enthusiastically endorsed the idea of a drought plan, although Cooke warned that the resulting reduction in river water use would boost water rates the CAP charges to Tucson, Phoenix and other municipal customers over time.

“We are not here to scare you. We are just presenting the best information we have,” Burman told a gathering that virtually filled a 275-person auditorium at the Arizona Historical Society Museum in Tempe.


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Re: Water Troubles

#307

Post by Volkonski » Wed Jul 18, 2018 11:46 am

This is worrying.

Alarming Report Details Southold’s Unsustainable Water Use

http://www.eastendbeacon.com/alarming-r ... water-use/
The report was funded with a grant from the Long Island Community Foundation, and makes use of both SCWA and private well data, along with U.S. Geological Survey data from 2016 that shows the groundwater elevation shrinking throughout the four separate segments of the Upper Glacial Aquifer that the North Fork relies on for its drinking water.

“In just six years, the Orient and East Marion five-foot groundwater contours have disappeared from a 2016 map documenting groundwater elevation, the deep section of the Cutchogue aquifer is not showing, and the deeper contours west of Mattituck Creek have pulled back from both the coast and the east,” said Ms. Berry, drawing on data from the U.S. Geological Survey.

:snippity:

While the state Department of Environmental Conservation and the Water Authority have set a goal of reducing peak demand from 2012 levels by 15 percent by 2020, the CDM Smith report cited by Ms. Berry shows that, for our groundwater recharge to be sustainable, peak use must be reduced by 33 percent.

“The Greenport/East Marion aquifer system should aim for an even higher goal of at least 45 percent, as the water cannot be fully sourced locally, and 100 percent of water use in the sewer district is lost, discharging directly to the LI Sound,” said Ms. Berry in her report. “Future growth needs to be reconsidered, as projected figures for 2030 have already been exceeded.”
:shock:

Perhaps we could build an aqueduct from Connecticut? :?


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Re: Water Troubles

#308

Post by RTH10260 » Wed Jul 18, 2018 12:27 pm

Volkonski wrote:
Wed Jul 18, 2018 11:46 am
This is worrying.

Alarming Report Details Southold’s Unsustainable Water Use

http://www.eastendbeacon.com/alarming-r ... water-use/

:snippity:

:shock:

Perhaps we could build an aqueduct from Connecticut? :?
dotus and Jared could ask their good friends in Saudi Arabia how they build water desalination plants in the large scale ;)
► Show Spoiler



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Re: Water Troubles

#309

Post by Addie » Wed Jul 18, 2018 2:59 pm

The Guardian
Sinking land, poisoned water: the dark side of California's mega farms

The floor of the Central Valley is slumping, and there is arsenic in the tap water. Now it seems the two problems are connected


Towns across the Central Valley region of California have had tap water arsenic levels above the federal limit for almost two decades, levels that research suggests can raise the risk of a variety of cancers and lower IQ in children. During the same period, locals and scientists have noticed another odd phenomenon: the valley is sinking, at rates as fast as 25cm a year. Now it seems that the two problems are connected.

The 50,000 sq km of the Central Valley play an essential role in American life: some 250 crops grow here, about one-quarter of the nation’s food supply. Agriculture on this scale requires an enormous amount of water, especially as water-hungry crops like almonds have gained popularity. And since the area’s river and rainfall levels fluctuate widely even month to month, farmers say they have no choice but to drill wells and draw aggressively on aquifers.

Over the past century, groundwater levels in some places have fallen as much as 200 meters during drought conditions, according to the United States Geological Survey. The subsequent changes in water pressure alter underground architectures, leading to a sometimes-surreal slumping of land by as much as 10 meters.

Around Lanare, telephone poles tilt precariously as the land under them shifts and once-sturdy agricultural wells stand on spindly legs that were buried before the ground receded. At the Delta-Mendota canal nearby, the land has dropped some 3.5 meters over 80 years. Boats once easily passed underneath the canal’s bridge; now the water laps at the bridge’s concrete sides, threatening to spill on to the road.

The same subsurface change in pressure can suck arsenic out of layers of clay and into groundwater, like a sponge being squeezed, said Dr Scott Fendorf, a professor of earth science at Stanford University and a co-author of a new study on the subject. “When we’re overdrafting the aquifer, the two things happen simultaneously.”


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Re: Water Troubles

#310

Post by Volkonski » Wed Aug 01, 2018 4:19 pm

:o


NBC News

@NBCNews
· 19m
Farmers across northern Europe — from Ireland to the Baltics — are grappling with a once-in-a-generation drought.

The unrelenting heat wave has devastated crops, with more than half of the harvest expected to be lost in some areas. http://nbcnews.to/2v4HCws (1/5) pic.twitter.com/0Ek6yP2WMW

NBC News

@NBCNews
Some of the crops hit by the drought include:

- Potatoes: At least 25% of Germany’s harvest is likely to be affected.

- Corn: Around 60% has been destroyed in the Netherlands.

- Carrots: U.K. growers expect losses from 30-40%. http://nbcnews.to/2v4HCws (2/5) pic.twitter.com/p50yXKRVUF

4:07 PM - Aug 1, 2018


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Re: Water Troubles

#311

Post by Addie » Fri Aug 03, 2018 8:22 pm

NBC News
Toxic red tide is making Floridians sick — and angry

Red tides in the Gulf of Mexico and toxic blue-green algae in inland waters are killing animals and stoking outrage in South Florida.


In South Florida this summer, one ecological scourge has piled on top of another.

First came the red tide, a flotilla of microorganisms that dyed the sea rust and eventually stretched out along 100 miles of the Gulf Coast. Oxygen-starved fish, eels, dolphins and turtles littered beaches, in numbers too vast to count. In one marina, so many fish went belly up that they appeared to pave a walkway across the water.

The foul siege reached from Sarasota nearly to the tip of Florida by early June, when ecological insult No. 2 arrived. A green film of cyanobacteria appeared, as it regularly does in summer, in vast Lake Okeechobee. But this year the bacteria also spilled over into rivers and canals, which carried the toxic green sludge east to the Atlantic Ocean and west to the Gulf of Mexico. Already distressed Floridians gagged on the noxious odor, and more than a dozen people reportedly went to local emergency rooms after coming into contact with the contaminated water. Some wept as beloved manatees expired, bloated and tinted a ghastly green. ...

The twin emergencies have hurt Florida’s tourist-driven economy, spurred calls for greater controls on fertilizers and other pollutants that fuel the fresh-water algae blooms and led to recriminations in the races for governor and the U.S. Senate.

"Here's how bad things have gotten,” wrote WINK-TV weathercaster Matt DeVitt in a Facebook post, alongside a gallery of dead wildlife photos. “Born and raised in Florida and I've never seen it this bad.”


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Re: Water Troubles

#312

Post by RTH10260 » Fri Aug 03, 2018 8:45 pm

Addie wrote:
Fri Aug 03, 2018 8:22 pm
NBC News
Toxic red tide is making Floridians sick — and angry

:snippity:
FL voters please don't forget the Great Leader you voted for and his EPA slave working for the industry and against regulations... :daydream:



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Re: Water Troubles

#313

Post by Volkonski » Sun Aug 12, 2018 3:28 pm




Chris Grisby

@ChrisWinkNews
Follow Follow @ChrisWinkNews
More
Hundreds of people are gathering right now on Fort Myers Beach to stand in solidarity for clean water. #HandsAlongTheWater


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Re: Water Troubles

#314

Post by Addie » Thu Aug 16, 2018 9:26 am

Associated Press
Number of "marine heat waves" roughly doubled between 1982 and 2016, study finds

WASHINGTON -- Even the oceans are breaking temperature records in this summer of heat waves. Off the San Diego coast, scientists earlier this month recorded all-time high seawater temperatures since daily measurements began in 1916.

"Just like we have heat waves on land, we also have heat waves in the ocean," said Art Miller of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography.

Between 1982 and 2016, the number of "marine heat waves" roughly doubled, and likely will become more common and intense as the planet warms, a study released Wednesday found. Prolonged periods of extreme heat in the oceans can damage kelp forests and coral reefs, and harm fish and other marine life. ...

His team defined marine heat waves as extreme events in which sea-surface temperatures exceeded the 99th percentile of measurements for a given location. Because oceans both absorb and release heat more slowly than air, most marine heat waves last for at least several days -- and some for several weeks, said Frolicher.


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Re: Water Troubles

#315

Post by Addie » Fri Aug 17, 2018 9:51 am

Think Progress
Fracking is destroying America’s water supply, warns shocking new study

Toxic wastewater from fracking jumps 14-fold from 2011 to 2016 — and it may get 50 times bigger by 2030.


An alarming new study reveals fracking is quite simply destroying America’s water supply.

That means we are losing potable water forever in many semi-arid regions of the country, while simultaneously producing more carbon pollution that in turn is driving ever-worsening droughts in those same regions, as fracking expert Anthony Ingraffea, a professor at Cornell University, explained to ThinkProgress.

The game-changing study from Duke University found that “from 2011 to 2016, the water use per well increased up to 770 percent.” In addition, the toxic wastewater produced in the first year of production jumped up to 1440 percent.

“Previous studies suggested hydraulic fracturing does not use significantly more water than other energy sources, but those findings were based only on aggregated data from the early years of fracking,” explained co-author Avner Vengosh, a professor of geochemistry and water quality at Duke.

“After more than a decade of fracking operation, we now have more years of data to draw upon from multiple verifiable sources,” said Vengosh. The researchers looked at data on water used — and oil, gas, and wastewater produced — for over 12,000 wells from 2011 to 2016.


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Re: Water Troubles

#316

Post by Addie » Fri Aug 17, 2018 10:32 am

Texas Observer
The US-Mexico border wall’s dangerous, costly side-effect: enormous floods

On July 27, 2014, monsoon rains hit the sister cities of Nogales, Arizona, in the US, and Nogales, Sonora, in Mexico. As the rain poured down, floodwaters rushed west of the Mariposa Port of Entry, clogging a 60-foot section of the border fence with debris. The bollard-style fence, with posts buried at least 7 feet underground, had been designed to let water pass through, but the intensity of the flooding and the size of the debris, which included tree trunks, toppled it.

For longtime Nogales residents on both sides of the border, the incident felt like déjà vu. Six years earlier, monsoon rains had flooded the downtown Nogales, Sonora, a city of about 210,000, trapping merchants in their stores, causing $8 million worth of damage, and drowning two people. That time, too, the culprit was border infrastructure.

In the 1990s, US Border Patrol had built a series of steel walls between the two Nogales towns to deter illegal activity. But traffickers simply began using the drainage tunnels between the towns to get into the United States. The agency then installed grates in the tunnels, but traffickers cut through them. In the escalating arms race, Border Patrol finally constructed a 5-foot-high concrete wall in one of the tunnels. In 2008, monsoon floodwaters built up behind the wall, collapsing the tunnel on the Mexican side. ...

“The Rio Grande Valley isn’t really a valley, it’s a delta,” says Melinda Melo, an organizer for the No Border Wall Coalition. “There are flooding risks here in the same sort of way as in Nogales.”


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Re: Water Troubles

#317

Post by RTH10260 » Sun Aug 26, 2018 10:38 pm

Kansas government didn’t tell Wichita-area residents their water was contaminated for 6 years
Sarah K. Burris SARAH K. BURRIS
26 AUG 2018 AT 22:00 ET

Like something out of the movie “Erin Brockovich,” the Kansas government had knowledge of two neighborhoods in the Wichita-area that had contaminated water. However, they didn’t act for six or seven years.

According to The Wichita Eagle, hundreds of residents drank water that was contaminated by a dry cleaning chemical known as perchloroethylene that had seeped into the groundwater.


The discovery was made in 2011 when investigating a possible expansion of a Kwik Shop, but it took six years for the Kansas Department of Health and Environment to inform the residents. But, wells owned by private citizens less than a mile away weren’t tested.

For Joe Hufman, it was seven years before he learned his suburban well was contaminated by a Haysville dry cleaner.

“Haysville knew it. KDHE knew it. Kwik Shop knew it,” he told The Eagle.

His isn’t the only case, either. Another dry cleaning site, near Central and Tyler in Wichita, was contaminated and the state didn’t notify residents of more than 200 homes for four years their drinking water had been impacted.

There are 22 contaminated sites across the state where private wells haven’t been checked, so these two could be only the beginning.


https://www.rawstory.com/2018/08/kansas ... d-6-years/



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Re: Water Troubles

#318

Post by Addie » Wed Aug 29, 2018 1:27 pm

BBC News
Scallop war: French and British boats clash in Channel

French and British fishermen have clashed in the English Channel in an escalating battle over scallops.

About 40 French boats tried to stop five larger British boats from fishing 12 nautical miles (22km) off the Normandy coast, in the Bay of Seine.

Fishing boats collided and stones were thrown, but no-one was injured.

UK boats are entitled to fish in the scallop-rich area, but their presence has angered the French, who accuse the British of depleting shellfish stocks.

Now UK fishermen are demanding government protection, while the French bewail the loss of a "primary resource".

What exactly happened?

The French boats gathered overnight on Monday in protest against so-called British "pillaging".


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Re: Water Troubles

#319

Post by Addie » Sun Sep 02, 2018 11:48 am

Smithsonian Mag: America’s Lakes Are Losing Their Blue Hue as Waters Shift to Murky Greenish-Brown

Over five-year period, the country’s number of blue lakes declined by 18 percent, while murky lakes increased by 12 percent


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Re: Water Troubles

#320

Post by Addie » Sun Sep 09, 2018 10:36 am

:thumbs:

TIME
A Dutch Teenager Had a Dream to Clean Up the World's Oceans. 7 Years On, It's Coming True

For someone who gets violently seasick, Boyan Slat spends a lot of time thinking about the ocean. The Dutch inventor has designed the world’s first ocean plastic cleanup system but admits he won’t be on the ship with it when it launches out of San Francisco on Saturday. “I am not a man of the sea,” he says.

After five and a half years of hard work, the 23-year-old Slat will watch from dry land as System 001 — a floating barrier nearly 2,000ft long — snakes its way out under the Golden Gate Bridge into the Pacific. Its destination is the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, a gyre of plastic waste twice the size of Texas held in position by ocean currents between California and Hawaii.

If all goes to plan, Slat says, an array of 60 systems could reduce the amount of plastic there by half by 2025. “I hope that this will be a turning point for the plastic pollution problem,” Slat tells TIME in a phone interview a few days before the launch, in between final preparations. “For sixty years it has only gotten worse and worse. Now hopefully we’re turning the tide.”

The eradication of the garbage patch, and more broadly the salvation of our oceans, has been Slat’s single-minded goal ever since he was 16 years old, when a diving trip to Greece yielded more plastic bag sightings than fish. Struck by the idea for a floating barrier that could collect plastic using the power of ocean currents alone, he founded his company, The Ocean Cleanup, aged just 18.


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Re: Water Troubles

#321

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Sun Sep 09, 2018 12:31 pm

I love this story too, Addie.

https://www.king5.com/article/news/nati ... 9c-18d8fa1

It took 5 years, now the Ocean Cleanup system is heading to the Great Pacific Garbage Patch


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Re: Water Troubles

#322

Post by Addie » Mon Sep 24, 2018 1:40 pm

The Guardian
'We're moving to higher ground': America's era of climate mass migration is here

By the end of this century, sea level rise alone could displace 13 million people, according to one study, including 6 million in Florida. States including Louisiana, California, New York and New Jersey will also have to grapple with hordes of residents seeking dry ground. ...


“There’s not a state unaffected by this,” said demographer Mat Hauer, lead author of the research, which is predicated on a severe 6ft sea level increase. There are established migration preferences for some places – south Florida to Georgia, New York to Colorado – but in many cases people would uproot to the closest inland city, if they have the means.

“The Great Migration was out of the south into the industrialized north, whereas this is from every coastal place in the US to every other place in the US,” said Hauer. “Not everyone can afford to move, so we could end up with trapped populations that would be in a downward spiral. I have a hard time imagining what that future would be like.”

Within just a few decades, hundreds of thousands of homes on US coasts will be chronically flooded. By the end of the century, 6ft of sea level rise would redraw the coastline with familiar parts – such as southern Florida, chunks of North Carolina and Virginia, much of Boston, all but a sliver of New Orleans – missing. Warming temperatures will fuel monstrous hurricanes – like the devastating triumvirate of Irma, Maria and Harvey in 2017, followed by Florence this year – that will scatter survivors in jarring, uncertain ways.

The projections are starting to materialize in parts of the US, forming the contours of the climate migration to come.



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Re: Water Troubles

#323

Post by Addie » Wed Oct 24, 2018 7:55 pm

Associated Press
Report: More Than 500,000 US Households Had Water Cut Off

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Water service was cut off to an estimated 1.4 million people living in more than a half-a-million American households that got behind on their bills two years ago, as some struggled to keep up with rising costs and governments didn't do enough to help, a group contends in a first-of-its-kind study released Wednesday.

Food & Water Watch, a Washington-based nonprofit that advocates for affordable and safe food and water for everyone, made public requests for 2016 residential shut-off records from the two biggest water suppliers in each state and received the information from 73 of them.

It found that among the cities with the highest rates, where at least 10 percent of residential customers had their water shut off for some period of time, were Detroit, New Orleans, Springdale, Arkansas, and Oklahoma's two largest cities, Oklahoma City and Tulsa.

Poor people and cities with large minority populations frequently had higher shut-off rates, the study found. The author of the report, Mary Grant, noted that some poor households in New Orleans and Detroit that year paid more than $1,000 for water service, which amounted to about 9 percent of their household incomes.

"Nine percent of your income just for your basic water service. That's, by any measure, unaffordable," Grant said.



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Re: Water Troubles

#324

Post by Jez » Fri Oct 26, 2018 8:44 am

Addie wrote:
Wed Oct 24, 2018 7:55 pm
Associated Press
Report: More Than 500,000 US Households Had Water Cut Off

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Water service was cut off to an estimated 1.4 million people living in more than a half-a-million American households that got behind on their bills two years ago, as some struggled to keep up with rising costs and governments didn't do enough to help, a group contends in a first-of-its-kind study released Wednesday.

Food & Water Watch, a Washington-based nonprofit that advocates for affordable and safe food and water for everyone, made public requests for 2016 residential shut-off records from the two biggest water suppliers in each state and received the information from 73 of them.

It found that among the cities with the highest rates, where at least 10 percent of residential customers had their water shut off for some period of time, were Detroit, New Orleans, Springdale, Arkansas, and Oklahoma's two largest cities, Oklahoma City and Tulsa.

Poor people and cities with large minority populations frequently had higher shut-off rates, the study found. The author of the report, Mary Grant, noted that some poor households in New Orleans and Detroit that year paid more than $1,000 for water service, which amounted to about 9 percent of their household incomes.

"Nine percent of your income just for your basic water service. That's, by any measure, unaffordable," Grant said.
We've run into that here in Dayton. I was outside when the water guy walked up to shut off the water. Luckily, he was extremely nice and gave me a few minutes to call the water department and pay the bill the Dawn hadn't paid. Luckily, I had the money, though I had ear marked it for something else. Not a bill, but saving towards a new graphics card for my PC. So, the water didn't get shut off that month.

Edit: I should add that her water bill is due quarterly. It was about $210 for the quarter, so divide by three, it comes to about $70 a month. If she sets that aside each month, she would have the money when it's due. Yes, I've had this talk with her.


I have learned silence from the talkative, toleration from the intolerant, and kindness from the unkind; yet, strange, I am ungrateful to those teachers.

~Khalil Gibran

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Addie
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Re: Water Troubles

#325

Post by Addie » Thu Nov 01, 2018 12:58 pm

Reuters: Where goats drink first: Women struggle as coastal India grows saltier



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