Science, General Stuff

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RTH10260
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1201

Post by RTH10260 » Tue Apr 24, 2018 5:53 pm

Tiredretiredlawyer wrote:
Tue Apr 24, 2018 3:26 pm
https://www.sciencefriday.com/articles/ ... -of-seeds/

Great pics and descriptions.
SCI CANDY GALLERY
A Yearbook Of Seeds
From the Uncarina seed’s fashionable coat to the flowing orange locks of the Bird of Paradise seed, we present this year’s seed superlatives.
Politically correctness... ;)

Best Hair: Bird Of Paradise (Stelitzia reginae)

Native to South Africa ==> illegal immgrant ;)




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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1202

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Tue Apr 24, 2018 6:02 pm

:rotflmao:


"The people must know before they can act, and there is no educator to compare with the press." - Ida B. Wells-Barnett, journalist, newspaper editor, suffragist, feminist and founder with others of NAACP.

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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1203

Post by Volkonski » Wed Apr 25, 2018 10:43 am

A moment frozen in time: evidence of a late fifth-century massacre at Sandby borg

https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals ... ore-reader
Abstract

The European Migration Period (c. AD 400–550) was characterised by political, social and economic instability. Recent excavations at Sandby borg ringfort on the island of Öland in Sweden have revealed indisputable evidence of a massacre which occurred at that time. Osteological, contextual and artefactual evidence strongly suggest that the fort was abandoned immediately following the attack and was left undisturbed throughout antiquity. Sandby borg offers a unique snapshot of domestic life and abrupt death in the Scandinavian Migration Period, and provides evidence highly relevant to studies of ancient conflict, and on social and military aspects of Iron Age and Migration Period societies.
Wow!

The people were brutally killed but the killers didn't bother top steal their valuables. :? The site remained untouched for 1500 years until the recent excavations.

So far only a small part of the site has been excavated, just 3 of 53 houses. That took 3 years. We will be getting new revelations about this for along time.

News story about this here-

https://www.theguardian.com/science/201 ... 1524662005


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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1204

Post by Whatever4 » Wed Apr 25, 2018 5:17 pm

Volkonski wrote:
Wed Apr 25, 2018 10:43 am
A moment frozen in time: evidence of a late fifth-century massacre at Sandby borg

https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals ... ore-reader
Abstract

The European Migration Period (c. AD 400–550) was characterised by political, social and economic instability. Recent excavations at Sandby borg ringfort on the island of Öland in Sweden have revealed indisputable evidence of a massacre which occurred at that time. Osteological, contextual and artefactual evidence strongly suggest that the fort was abandoned immediately following the attack and was left undisturbed throughout antiquity. Sandby borg offers a unique snapshot of domestic life and abrupt death in the Scandinavian Migration Period, and provides evidence highly relevant to studies of ancient conflict, and on social and military aspects of Iron Age and Migration Period societies.
Wow!

The people were brutally killed but the killers didn't bother top steal their valuables. :? The site remained untouched for 1500 years until the recent excavations.

So far only a small part of the site has been excavated, just 3 of 53 houses. That took 3 years. We will be getting new revelations about this for along time.

News story about this here-

https://www.theguardian.com/science/201 ... 1524662005
That is wicked cool. Thanks! :thumbs:


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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1205

Post by RTH10260 » Sun Apr 29, 2018 8:06 pm

We have seen the SpaceX and the Tesla floating in space.

Here comes now Jeff Bezos and his Blue Origin competition in a short test run of the launcher and the reentry capsule




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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1206

Post by RTH10260 » Tue May 01, 2018 12:39 pm

NASA just proved it is serious about returning to the moon

BY MARK WHITTINGTON, OPINION CONTRIBUTOR — 05/01/18 12:30 PM EDT

Recently NASA canceled work on a proposed lunar rover called the Resource Prospector, less a mission than an idea for a mission. The RP would have sent a rover to one of the lunar poles to prospect for resources, including water ice, with a drill and an onboard laboratory. Work on the concept had been ongoing for four years, even though it was never an approved mission on NASA’s manifest.

The decision to cancel the RP elicited a flurry of media reports that, in effect, NASA was canceling a lunar mission just as President Trump had ordered the space agency to return to the moon. The truth is a little more complicated.

:snippity:

Bridenstine did not take long to respond on his Twitter feed.

“We’re committed to lunar exploration @NASA. Resource Prospector instruments will go forward in an expanded lunar surface campaign. More landers. More science. More exploration. More prospectors. More commercial partners. Ad astra!”

NASA then expanded on the tweet.


http://thehill.com/opinion/technology/3 ... o-the-moon



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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1207

Post by Mr. Gneiss » Wed May 02, 2018 5:39 pm

Stephen Hawking's last paper co-authored with Thomas Hertog was just published in the Journal of High Energy Physics, April 2018, 2018:147.

It is open sourced: A smooth exit from eternal inflation?

From CNN Stephen Hawking's final research paper has been published, and it's mind-bending
True to Hawking's oeuvre, the paper tackles the same questions as any other bubbly beach read: Do we live in a multiverse? Did the Big Bang create infinite universes? If there are infinite universes, does that mean that there are no laws that can govern their organization or creation? If there aren't infinite universes, and simply many, what laws govern how many and which ones?

:snippity:

The basic gist of it is this: Lets assume The Big Bang created the universe, and continues to expand infinitely (called eternal inflation). This idea, championed by Hawking and Hertog, also implies that there are infinite universes. The problem is, if there are infinite universes there is no way to position our own selves in our universe and no governing laws of physics across all universes that can be used to know them.

In this new paper, Hawking and Herzog reexamined the theoretical characteristics of the Big Bang using new mathematical applications. They conclude that, in their new model, all universes must share some law of physics. This gives future scientists and physicists a more structured set of information to identify other universes.
JHEP04(2018)147.pdf
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1208

Post by Volkonski » Wed May 02, 2018 8:44 pm

How Far Could You Sail in a Straight Line Without Hitting Land

https://www.livescience.com/62465-longe ... earth.html
The path that the algorithm returned closely mirrored Anderson's. Again, when rendered to a flattened map, the track appears to follow a curve. But when seen on a globe, the path is a straight line, according to figures presented in the study.

It started in Pakistan, "threaded the needle" between mainland Africa and Madagascar, continued between Antarctica and Tierra del Fuego in South America, and terminated in Kamchatka Krai in Russia, covering 19,940 miles (32,090 km), the scientists wrote.
:nope: :fingerwag:

Because the earth is very nearly a sphere it is impossible to sail any distance at all in a straight line. That 19940 mile path is a section of a circle. It is not straight.


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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1209

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Sat May 12, 2018 9:21 am

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/worl ... 47896.html
Man with the golden arm has saved 2.4 million babies by donating blood every week for 60 years
Unique disease-fighting antibodies have helped create special injection to help pregnant women


Because his blood has unique disease-fighting antibodies, it is used to create an injection which combats rhesus disease – a condition where the blood of pregnant women attacks their unborn babies.

Mr Harrison, of New South Wales, discovered his blood had unique properties when he had a lung removed, aged just 14.

Doctors found it contained an antibody which could be used to create the life-saving ‘Anti-D’ injections. Every batch of the life-saving Anti-D that has ever been made in Australia has come from James' blood. And more than 17 per cent of women in Australia are at risk so James has helped save a lot of lives."

"In Australia, up until about 1967, there were literally thousands of babies dying each year, doctors didn't know why, and it was awful,” Jemma Falkenmire, of the Australian Red Cross Blood Service, told CNN in 2015. “Women were having numerous miscarriages and babies were being born with brain damage. Australia was one of the first countries to discover a blood donor with this antibody, so it was quite revolutionary at the time.


"The people must know before they can act, and there is no educator to compare with the press." - Ida B. Wells-Barnett, journalist, newspaper editor, suffragist, feminist and founder with others of NAACP.

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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1210

Post by Volkonski » Thu May 17, 2018 11:48 am

We are in the midst of a baby bust. No wonder Toys R Us went bankrupt.

U.S. Fertility Rate Fell to a Record Low, for a Second Straight Year

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/17/us/f ... tates.html
The fertility rate fell to 60.2 births per 1,000 women of childbearing age, down 3 percent from 2016, according to the National Center for Health Statistics. It was the largest single-year decline since 2010, when families were still feeling the effects of a weak economy.

Fertility rates are essential measures of a society’s demographic balance. If they are too high, that can strain resources like housing and education. If they are too low, a country can face challenges replacing its work force and supporting its older adults, like in Russia and Japan. In the United States, declines in rates have not led to drops in the population, in part because they have been largely offset by immigration.

The country has been living through one of the longest declines in fertility in decades and demographers are trying to figure out what is driving it. Rates tend to drop during difficult economic times as people put off having babies, and then rise once the economy rebounds. But the rate has not recovered since the Great Recession. A brief uptick in 2014 did not last. The number of births has also declined, and last year was its lowest level since 1987. The fertility rate is the number of births per 1,000 women ages 15 to 44.

:snippity:

He said it seemed to be inconsistent with the growing number of women of childbearing age: In 2017, women had nearly 500,000 fewer babies than in 2007, despite the fact that there were an estimated 7 percent more women in their prime childbearing years of 20 to 39.
The current US birth rate is well below the replacement fertility rate. Without immigration the US population would be declining.


Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1211

Post by AndyinPA » Thu May 17, 2018 12:49 pm

We need population to be declining everywhere.



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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1212

Post by Danraft » Fri May 25, 2018 10:14 pm

umm.
Thought I would share some NASA NEWS...
Regarding the "Space changes genes"...
The sloppy wording leaves them having to correct 'Fake News

Let me recommend you this NEWS from Science NewsApp

https://phys.org/news/2018-05-scientist ... -news.html


We've got work to doing!
So, pull on your Sock Puppets --and start Mis-spelling!!!

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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1213

Post by Danraft » Sun Jun 17, 2018 2:12 pm

On a lighter note...
An effort to solve the Loch Ness monster using a DNA study has begun...

Let me recommend you this NEWS from Science NewsApp

https://phys.org/news/2018-06-scientist ... r-dna.html


We've got work to doing!
So, pull on your Sock Puppets --and start Mis-spelling!!!

- Dr Whom, Time Lord
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1214

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Thu Jun 21, 2018 7:48 am

https://www.livescience.com/62865-first ... rsery.html
First Known Nursery for Baby Manta Rays Discovered Off the Texas Coast

Tucked away in the warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico, the world's first known nursery for baby manta rays has been discovered amid the shallow reefs. And marine scientists are excited.

Biologist Joshua Stewart, a doctoral candidate at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego, noticed several juvenile mantas (Mobula birostris) while conducting research at Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary, about 100 miles (160 kilometers) south of the Texas-Louisiana border. Noting the rarity of this sighting, Stewart teamed up with sanctuary staff to determine whether this spot really was highly frequented by the little rays.

The team combed through 25 years' worth of dive logs and photographs collected by the sanctuary's staff divers, according to a statement released by Scripps. The scientists used the unique markings on the undersides of the rays to identify them, much like matching human fingerprints. They found that roughly 95 percent of the mantas visiting Flower Garden Banks were juveniles. Stewart's team confirmed the area as a nursery by comparing the young mantas' use of the Flower Garden Banks habitat to known indicators of shark and ray nurseries. [Marine Marvels: Spectacular Photos of Sea Creatures]

In January 2018, the U.S. government listed manta rays as threatened under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. The rays are targeted by certain fisheries, primarily in Southeast Asia, and caught incidentally during the fishing of other species worldwide.


"The people must know before they can act, and there is no educator to compare with the press." - Ida B. Wells-Barnett, journalist, newspaper editor, suffragist, feminist and founder with others of NAACP.

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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1215

Post by Sam the Centipede » Thu Jun 21, 2018 9:51 am

I don't dive, but the video I have seen of manta rays shows them to be wonderful creatures, both graceful and intelligent.

Divers have apparently reported that manta rays are curious and will engage in games of imitation with divers, were the manta mimics the diver's moves.

Biologists and naturalists are gradually uncovering more about the hitherto unnoticed intelligence of many species, both small and large.



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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1216

Post by RTH10260 » Thu Jun 21, 2018 3:29 pm

First Ever Live Computer-Human Debate: Who Won?
June 20, 2018

Computers are increasingly competing against humans to see whether man or machine is smarter.

In the latest demonstration of artificial intelligence or AI, a computer went up against humans in live, public debates.

The debates – held this week in San Francisco – provided a new example of how computers are fast improving to think and sound more like humans.

The event was a demonstration of an AI system developed by major technology company IBM. It is called Project Debater.

IBM said it was the first time ever that an AI system has competed in a live, public debate with humans. Two separate debates were held between a computer and two human debaters.

The company preselected possible subjects for discussion, but said neither the computer nor the humans knew the chosen subject before the debate.

The discussions were set up in a similar way to most political debates. After preparing arguments, both sides got the chance to present a four-minute opening statement. Then came four-minute rebuttals, followed by closing statements.



https://learningenglish.voanews.com/a/f ... 47203.html



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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1217

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Thu Jun 21, 2018 9:41 pm

Sam the Centipede wrote:
Thu Jun 21, 2018 9:51 am
I don't dive, but the video I have seen of manta rays shows them to be wonderful creatures, both graceful and intelligent.

Divers have apparently reported that manta rays are curious and will engage in games of imitation with divers, were the manta mimics the diver's moves.

Biologists and naturalists are gradually uncovering more about the hitherto unnoticed intelligence of many species, both small and large.
I luvs me some manta rays. :lovestruck:


"The people must know before they can act, and there is no educator to compare with the press." - Ida B. Wells-Barnett, journalist, newspaper editor, suffragist, feminist and founder with others of NAACP.

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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1218

Post by RTH10260 » Fri Jul 06, 2018 6:08 am

Hayabusa 2 Spacecraft Preps for Exploration
The probe will map the surface, deploy rovers and collect pristine samples that could contain clues about the origins of life on Earth

By Elizabeth Tasker on June 29, 2018

On the morning of Tuesday June 19, members of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) viewed images beamed from deep space that triggered a flurry of responses.
:snippity:
They were gazing at the latest images of Ryugu, a 900-meter near-Earth asteroid that orbits the Sun between our planet and Mars. The images had been snapped by the camera aboard JAXA’s Hayabusa2 spacecraft from approximately 300 kilometers away from the asteroid.

Hayabusa2 is an asteroid sample-return mission led by JAXA’s Institute of Space and Astronautical Sciences (ISAS). The mission’s goal is to rendezvous with Ryugu, analyze its properties and perform a set of surface operations. Action on the surface involves deploying three small rovers and the European-designed lander known as MASCOT, as well as gathering three different samples of material to return to Earth. Prior to collecting the third sample, Hayabusa2 will release a two-kilogram copper projectile dubbed the SCI (Small Carry-on Impactor) to create an artificial crater on Ryugu’s surface so that subsurface material can be gathered. As of this writing, the probe has just arrived at Ryugu, where it will stay until the end of 2019, before dispatching its sample-filled capsule back to Earth at the end of 2020.


https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/ob ... ploration/



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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1219

Post by TollandRCR » Tue Jul 24, 2018 12:33 am

I chanced upon a National Geographic article that inspired me. It is about ants, which have been in the planet about as long as flowering plants. They are a extraordinarily diverse group of animals. Many are fascinating, such as the turtle snt.

I usually do not get inspired by ants. The other focus of the article is a woman scientist, Carrie Moreau, who is at Chicago’s Field Museum. Ants are one of her specialties. The other one is making it possible for women to enter science and succeed.

https://www.google.com/amp/s/relay.nati ... in-biology


“The truth is, we know so little about life, we don’t really know what the good news is and what the bad news is.” Kurt Vonnegut

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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1220

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Wed Jul 25, 2018 3:06 pm

https://newatlas.com/wind-pacman-ocean- ... ect/55567/
Giant Pac-Man: Ocean Cleanup's final design to eat away at the Great Pacific Garbage Patch
This video at the end of the article explains all. Great pics in the article as well.



"The people must know before they can act, and there is no educator to compare with the press." - Ida B. Wells-Barnett, journalist, newspaper editor, suffragist, feminist and founder with others of NAACP.

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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1221

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Sat Aug 11, 2018 5:49 am

We're going to need a bigger boat! :shark:

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nat ... 955203002/
Man finds massive teeth from extinct megashark dating back 25 million years

Mulally found a set of shark teeth dating back 25 million years, belonging to a "megatooth" shark believed to be twice the size of a great white.

Mullaly donated the teeth to Museums Victoria in Australia to keep as part of their collection.

The museum said the teeth belonged to an extinct species called the Great Jagged Narrow-Toothed Shark (Carcharocles angustidens), which could grow to twice the size of a great white.


"The people must know before they can act, and there is no educator to compare with the press." - Ida B. Wells-Barnett, journalist, newspaper editor, suffragist, feminist and founder with others of NAACP.

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