Science, General Stuff

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RTH10260
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1276

Post by RTH10260 » Fri Apr 26, 2019 5:28 pm

Goats Prefer Happy Human Faces
Like dogs and horses, goats can discern happy from angry facial expressions. But whether these animals possess empathy remains unclear.
Dec 1, 2018
JEF AKST

Alan McElligott, an animal behavior researcher at the University of Roehampton in the UK, continues to be impressed by goats. Since he started studying the charismatic ungulates a decade ago, he’s found that mothers remember the calls of their kids several months after they’ve been separated, and that goats can solve a two-step puzzle box akin to those typically used in primate research—and remember how to do it a year later.

Now his team has found that goats at the Buttercups Sanctuary in Kent, UK, can distinguish between happy and angry human expressions. “Given some of the other things that we’ve found out about goats, I guess we shouldn’t really be that surprised,” says McElligott, who’s hoping to improve welfare guidelines for the animals by revealing their smart and social nature.


https://www.the-scientist.com/notebook/ ... aces-65081

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Notorial Dissent
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1277

Post by Notorial Dissent » Fri Apr 26, 2019 6:09 pm

Goats are very social and are generally very intelligent. They are herd animals and don't like being by themselves, which is why they will develop intense bonds with humans since they consider them part of the herd.
The fact that you sincerely and wholeheartedly believe that the “Law of Gravity” is unconstitutional and a violation of your sovereign rights, does not absolve you of adherence to it.

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RTH10260
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1278

Post by RTH10260 » Tue Apr 30, 2019 6:16 pm

Scientists pull speech directly from the brain
Devin Coldewey@techcrunch

In a feat that could eventually unlock the possibility of speech for people with severe medical conditions, scientists have successfully recreated the speech of healthy subjects by tapping directly into their brains. The technology is a long, long way from practical application but the science is real and the promise is there.

Edward Chang, neurosurgeon at UC San Francisco and co-author of the paper published today in Nature, explained the impact of the team’s work in a press release: “For the first time, this study demonstrates that we can generate entire spoken sentences based on an individual’s brain activity. This is an exhilarating proof of principle that with technology that is already within reach, we should be able to build a device that is clinically viable in patients with speech loss.”

To be perfectly clear, this isn’t some magic machine that you sit in and its translates your thoughts into speech. It’s a complex and invasive process that decodes not exactly what the subject is thinking but what they were actually speaking.


https://techcrunch.com/2019/04/24/scien ... the-brain/

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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1279

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Mon May 06, 2019 10:00 am

https://www.livescience.com/65406-histo ... anics.html
Last-Ditch Hack Led to the Invention of Quantum Mechanics

Let's say you've got some random object in front of you — how about a nice hot cup of coffee? You can see the cup and the coffee, of course, because light from your lamp is reflecting off it and into your eyeballs. And you can feel its warmth as you grab the mug. But hold your hand just beside the cup. You still feel a bit of warmth, don't you?

That's because the cup of coffee is indeed making its own kind of light, but it's not the visible kind. It's emitting light with a wavelength longer than the deepest red you could possibly imagine. What's below the red? Infrared. It may not be visible, but it's still a kind of light.

But your coffee cools while sitting on your desk, and eventually, you won't be able to feel the radiating warmth. Why did the hot cup of coffee emit radiation that you could feel, but the cold cup of coffee didn't? Who decides what kind of radiation is emitted when?

This was a huge, burning question in the minds of 19th-century physicists, who had been studying a particular kind of radiation called blackbody radiation. The name comes from the experimental device used to investigate this phenomenon: a box coated in black on the interior, with a teensy-tiny pinhole for viewing.
You must read to find the answer. This author has a youtube channel and blogs. Very interesting. http://www.pmsutter.com/shows/askaspaceman
“A black woman can invent something for the benefit of humankind.” -Bessie Blount-Griffin, physical therapist, inventor of devices for disabled WWII veterans, and forensic scientist.

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RTH10260
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1280

Post by RTH10260 » Thu May 09, 2019 11:35 pm

Robots on the narrow path to doom?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=popvnHUu3uU

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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1281

Post by Whatever4 » Sat May 11, 2019 1:57 am

RTH10260 wrote:
Thu May 09, 2019 11:35 pm
Robots on the narrow path to doom?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=popvnHUu3uU
Robot is way better at not falling than W2 is.
"[Moderate] doesn't mean you don't have views. It just means your views aren't predictable ideologically one way or the other, and you're trying to follow the facts where they lead and reach your own conclusions."
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RTH10260
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1282

Post by RTH10260 » Sat May 11, 2019 8:12 am

Whatever4 wrote:
Sat May 11, 2019 1:57 am
RTH10260 wrote:
Thu May 09, 2019 11:35 pm
Robots on the narrow path to doom?

https:// www.youtube.com/watch?v=popvnHUu3uU
Robot is way better at not falling than W2 is.
:twisted: just wait until the airline industry gets their hands on it and takes corners by making the balancing sensors optional for cost savings :think:

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RTH10260
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1283

Post by RTH10260 » Fri May 17, 2019 1:12 pm

for the math geeks
Pentagon Tiling Proof Solves Century-Old Math Problem
A French mathematician has completed the classification of all convex pentagons, and therefore all convex polygons, that tile the plane.

Olena Shmahalo/Quanta Magazine

One of the oldest problems in geometry asks which shapes tile the plane, locking together with copies of themselves to cover a flat area in an endless pattern called a tessellation. M.C. Escher’s drawings of tessellating lizards and other creatures illustrate that an unlimited variety of shapes can do this.

The inventorying reduces to a finite, though still formidable, task when mathematicians consider only convex polygons: simple, flat-edged shapes like triangles and rectangles whose angles all bend in the same direction. Now, a new proof by Michaël Rao, a 37-year-old mathematician at CNRS (France’s national center for scientific research) and the École Normale Supérieure de Lyon, finally completes the classification of convex polygons that tile the plane by conquering the last holdouts: pentagons, which have resisted sorting for 99 years.

Try placing regular pentagons — those with equal angles and sides — edge to edge and gaps soon form; they do not tile. The ancient Greeks proved that the only regular polygons that tile are triangles, quadrilaterals and hexagons (as now seen on many a bathroom floor).

But squash and stretch a pentagon into an irregular shape and tilings become possible. In his 1918 doctoral thesis, the German mathematician Karl Reinhardt identified five types of irregular convex pentagons that tile the plane: They were families defined by common rules, such as “side a equals side b,” “c equals d,” and “angles A and C both equal 90 degrees.”


https://www.quantamagazine.org/pentagon ... -20170711/

Mr. Gneiss
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1284

Post by Mr. Gneiss » Fri May 17, 2019 1:22 pm

I need more caffeine. I read the last post as "U.S. Military Tiling Proof Solves Century-Old Math Problem."

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Chilidog
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1285

Post by Chilidog » Fri May 17, 2019 4:15 pm

I saw it as

"US Military solves tiling problem in the Pentagon."

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RTH10260
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1286

Post by RTH10260 » Fri May 17, 2019 5:23 pm

Chilidog wrote:
Fri May 17, 2019 4:15 pm
I saw it as

"US Military solves tiling problem in the Pentagon."
Better invest in new flooring than have the money pinched for The Wall :lol:

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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1287

Post by RTH10260 » Fri May 17, 2019 9:29 pm

“Bomb Carbon” Has Been Found in Deep-Ocean Creatures
The detection of this radioactive relic of nuclear weapons tests in a remote environment shows humanity’s far-reaching environmental impact

By Adam Levy on May 15, 2019

The Mariana Trench, in the western Pacific Ocean between Japan and Papua New Guinea, plunges nearly seven miles below the surface at its deepest point. It is one of the most inaccessible environments on Earth, but it has not escaped the impact of humanity’s violence.

A group of scientists have now found radioactive carbon-14—at levels high enough to indicate it originated from the detonation of nuclear bombs—in the flesh of shrimplike crustaceans living in the trench. “Typically, we say the trenches are far away from us; they’re very deep and they’re pristine. But actually, they’re not,” says earth scientist Jiasong Fang of Shanghai Ocean University, who worked on the new study. “Everything can get into the trenches.”


https://www.scientificamerican.com/arti ... creatures/

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