Climate Change

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Volkonski
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Re: Climate Change

#426

Post by Volkonski » Tue Dec 11, 2018 6:21 pm

Jake Tapper

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Scientist: latest news from arctic is ‘canary in a coal mine’ https://cnn.it/2C4FoB4 @Rene_MarshCNN reports @TheLeadCNN


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Re: Climate Change

#427

Post by Somerset » Tue Dec 11, 2018 8:29 pm

Volkonski wrote:
Tue Dec 11, 2018 6:15 pm
Warming in Arctic Raises Fears of a ‘Rapid Unraveling’ of the Region

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/11/clim ... rming.html
Persistent warming in the Arctic is pushing the region into “uncharted territory” and increasingly affecting the continental United States, scientists said Tuesday.

“We’re seeing this continued increase of warmth pervading across the entire Arctic system,” said Emily Osborne, an official with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, who presented the agency’s annual assessment of the state of the region, the “Arctic Report Card.”

The Arctic has been warmer over the last five years than at any time since records began in 1900, the report found, and the region is warming at twice the rate as the rest of the planet.

Dr. Osborne, the lead editor of the report and manager of NOAA’s Arctic Research Program, said the Arctic was undergoing its “most unprecedented transition in human history.”
A little more on this:

https://www.wired.com/story/antarctica- ... ing-point/
Few places in Antarctica are more difficult to reach than Thwaites Glacier, a Florida-sized hunk of frozen water that meets the Amundsen Sea about 800 miles west of McMurdo. Until a decade ago, barely any scientists had ever set foot there, and the glacier’s remoteness, along with its reputation for bad weather, ensured that it remained poorly understood. Yet within the small community of people who study ice for a living, Thwaites has long been the subject of dark speculation. If this mysterious glacier were to “go bad”—glaciologist-­speak for the process by which a glacier breaks down into icebergs and eventually collapses into the ocean—it might be more than a scientific curiosity. Indeed, it might be the kind of event that changes the course of civilization.

In December 2008, a Penn State scientist named Sridhar Anandakrishnan and five of his colleagues made the epic journey to Thwaites, two days from McMurdo by plane, tractor, and snowmobile. All glaciers flow, but satellites and airborne radar missions had revealed that something worrisome was happening on Thwaites: The glacier was destabilizing, dumping ever more ice into the sea. On color-coded maps of the region, its flow rate went from stable blue to raise-the-alarms red. As Anandakrishnan puts it, “Thwaites started to pop.”

The change wasn’t necessarily cause for alarm. Big glaciers can speed up or slow down for reasons that scientists still don’t completely grasp. But Anandakrishnan knew that Thwaites’ unusual characteristics—it is shaped like a wedge, with the thin front end facing the ocean—left it vulnerable to losing vast quantities of ice quickly. What’s more, its size was something to reckon with. Many glaciers resemble narrow rivers that thread through mountain valleys and move small icebergs leisurely into the sea, like a chute or slide. Thwaites, if it went bad, would behave nothing like that. “Thwaites is a terrifying glacier,” Anandakrishnan says simply. Its front end measures about 100 miles across, and its glacial basin—the thick part of the wedge, extending deep into the West Antarctic interior—runs anywhere from 3,000 to more than 4,000 feet deep. A few years before Anandakrishnan’s first expedition, scientists had begun asking whether warming waters at the front edge could be playing a part in the glacier’s sudden stirring. But he wanted to know what was going on deep below Thwaites, where its ice met the earth.



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Re: Climate Change

#428

Post by Addie » Thu Dec 13, 2018 10:48 am

Cross-posting

Reuters
More Americans view climate change as 'imminent' threat: Reuters/Ipsos Poll

NEW YORK (Reuters) - A growing percentage of Americans see climate change as an “imminent” threat driven mainly by human activity, and more than two-thirds want Washington to work with other nations to combat it, according to a Reuters/Ipsos poll released on Thursday. ...

The Reuters/Ipsos poll, taken from Nov. 29 to Dec. 10, found that 35 percent of U.S. adults now see global warming as an “imminent” threat, up from 32 percent in 2017 and 24 percent in 2015.

More than half, or 57 percent, also think global warming is caused by “human activity” or “mostly human activity”, according to the survey, up from the 47 percent who attributed it to human activity in a similar poll in 2012.

And 69 percent said in the poll that the United States should work with other nations to curb climate change, including 64 percent of Republicans and 80 percent of Democrats. That marks a decline from 72 percent in a similar poll in 2017.



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Re: Climate Change

#429

Post by ZekeB » Thu Dec 13, 2018 11:18 am

It was the People of California's fault for the fires because they don't rake their woods. Who do you blame in NYC when they get snowed in week after week?


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Re: Climate Change

#430

Post by Dan1100 » Thu Dec 13, 2018 1:17 pm

ZekeB wrote:
Thu Dec 13, 2018 11:18 am
It was the People of California's fault for the fires because they don't rake their woods. Who do you blame in NYC when they get snowed in week after week?
Traditionally, snow in major American cities is always the mayor's fault.


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Re: Climate Change

#431

Post by Lani » Wed Dec 26, 2018 6:37 am

Japan is resuming the killing of minke whales despite the public's massive reduction of whale consumption and a drop to about 1000 whaling related jobs.

Meanwhile in Hawaii, humpback whale sightings have dropped dramatically over the past four years, estimated at 50 to 80 percent. About 11,000 used to visit us during our "winter". Always big news when the first ones arrived. Even bigger news when a mom and her newborn calf were spotted.
Marc Lammers, research coordinator for the agency’s Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary, said research groups have collected various data sets that all seem to point toward decreased whale sightings.

“People started to report fewer sightings, and there was concern about what might be going on,” Lammers said in a telephone interview.

“We just know that we’re not seeing them in the same places that we’re expecting to see them,” he said.

Many theories are being considered, including the possibility that warmer ocean temperatures are reducing food supplies in the north, said Rachel Cartwright, lead researcher at the Keiki Kohola Project. If the female whales are not getting enough food, they would be unable to reproduce, she said.
:(

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.washin ... story.html


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Re: Climate Change

#432

Post by neonzx » Wed Dec 26, 2018 7:08 am

Lani wrote:
Wed Dec 26, 2018 6:37 am
Meanwhile in Hawaii, humpback whale sightings have dropped dramatically over the past four years, estimated at 50 to 80 percent. About 11,000 used to visit us during our "winter". Always big news when the first ones arrived. Even bigger news when a mom and her newborn calf were spotted.
Marc Lammers, research coordinator for the agency’s Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary, said research groups have collected various data sets that all seem to point toward decreased whale sightings.

“People started to report fewer sightings, and there was concern about what might be going on,” Lammers said in a telephone interview.

“We just know that we’re not seeing them in the same places that we’re expecting to see them,” he said.

Many theories are being considered, including the possibility that warmer ocean temperatures are reducing food supplies in the north, said Rachel Cartwright, lead researcher at the Keiki Kohola Project. If the female whales are not getting enough food, they would be unable to reproduce, she said.
:(
...and 32 years ago, Star Trek IV warned us what could happen if we allow this majestic mammal to be driven to extinction. :cry:


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Re: Climate Change

#433

Post by Lani » Wed Dec 26, 2018 7:28 am

I loved that movie!

True story. A gazillion years ago, I was living in WDC and visiting a friend on Maui during Christmas. The thing I most wanted to do was go on a whale watching boat. So the boat went to various areas where we could sorta see the whales. On the way back to the dock, the captain spotted a closer whale which we approached. It began to move away from us. So the captain told us to call it to come back. People laughed. Not me. I begged the whale to please come closer. People laughed more. Then the whale turned back and came towards us. People stopped laughing. It was so big and so beautiful!

As it approached the boat, it suddenly dived and passed under the boat. So close! Amazing. I watched as it slipped under the boat. (People screaming.) Then it resurfaced in a magnificent breach. One of the great experiences of my life.


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Re: Climate Change

#434

Post by Volkonski » Sat Dec 29, 2018 2:07 pm

The latest newsletter from my alma mater, the MIT Mechanical Engineering Department, is all about new technology to fight climate change. :thumbs:
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The latest issue of our bi-annual newsletter, MechE Connects, is now online! It highlights our faculty, students, and alumni who are developing technologies to improve and protect the health of our planet http://mitsha.re/9lY230n78Iy
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I like this newsletter because it is one of the few mailings I get from MIT that is not asking for money. ;)


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Re: Climate Change

#435

Post by Volkonski » Mon Jan 07, 2019 10:44 am

Yale Environment 360

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The iconic “100th Meridian,” the North American climate boundary that visibly separates the humid eastern part of the continent from the more arid western plains, has shifted 140 miles east since 1980. https://e360.yale.edu/features/redrawin ... e-shifting
Image

Also noted in the article-

THE TROPICS ARE GETTING BIGGER AT 30 MILES PER DECADE

THE SAHARA DESERT HAS GOTTEN 10 PERCENT BIGGER SINCE 1920

TORNADO ALLEY HAS SHIFTED 500 MILES EAST IN 30 YEARS

PLANT HARDINESS ZONES ARE MOVING NORTH IN THE U.S. AT 13 MILES PER DECADE

THE PERMAFROST LINE HAS MOVED 80 MILES NORTH IN 50 YEARS IN PARTS OF CANADA

THE WHEAT BELT IS PUSHING POLEWARD AT UP TO 160 MILES PER DECADE (in Australia)


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Re: Climate Change

#436

Post by Addie » Tue Jan 08, 2019 11:12 am

WaPo
U.S. greenhouse gas emissions spiked in 2018 — and it couldn’t happen at a worse time

U.S. carbon dioxide emissions rose an estimated 3.4 percent in 2018, according to new research — a jarring increase that comes as scientists say the world needs to be aggressively cutting its emissions to avoid the most devastating effects of climate change.

The findings, published Tuesday by the independent economic research firm Rhodium Group, mean that the United States now has a diminishing chance of meeting its pledge under the 2015 Paris climate agreement to dramatically reduce its emissions by 2025.

The findings also underscore how the world’s second-largest emitter, once a global leader in pushing for climate action, has all but abandoned efforts to mitigate the effects of a warming world. President Trump has said he plans to officially withdraw the nation from the Paris climate agreement in 2020 and in the meantime has rolled back Obama-era regulations aimed at reducing the country’s carbon emissions.

“We have lost momentum. There’s no question,” Rob Jackson, a Stanford University professor who studies emissions trends, said of both U.S. and global efforts to steer the world toward a more sustainable future.

The sharp emissions rise was fueled primarily by a booming economy, researchers found. But the increase, which could prove to be the second-largest in the past 20 years, probably would not have been as stark without Trump administration rollbacks, said Trevor Houser, a partner at Rhodium.
Adding:
The Guardian: Carbon emissions up as Trump agenda rolls back climate change work

Last year’s 3.4% jump in emissions is the largest since 2010 recession and second largest gain in more than two decades



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Re: Climate Change

#437

Post by Volkonski » Wed Jan 09, 2019 3:48 pm

I have to order this book.
David Wallace-Wells

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Next month, @timdugganbooks will publish my big climate book, The Uninhabitable Earth, in which I try to take a very broad, and very long, view of the state of the climate crisis and all the ways it promises to transform how we live on this planet—all of us. (1/x)

The subtitle of the book is "Life After Warming," and while it is not a survey of worst-case scenarios, the portrait of our near-term future is harrowing enough, as anyone following the news from climate science knows.

Barring a change in our emissions trajectory, many major cities in India and the Middle East will become unlivably hot as soon as 2050. Many others, elsewhere in the world, will be fighting off constant flooding.

The number of climate refugees could reach the tens of millions, perhaps the hundreds of millions. Air pollution alone could kill 150 million—or more. And the economic cost of climate damages could top $600 trillion—more than double all the wealth that exists in the world today

But this is not primarily a book about the science of warming. It is a book about the humanities of climate change—what warming will mean to our politics, and culture, our relationship to capitalism and technology and perspective on history and social justice.

In other words, about how climate change will touch, and transform, and in almost all cases damage, the lives of everyone on earth, should we not stop it.

In fact, "could" is a much better word than "will," because all of this suffering is, speaking both practically and profoundly, optional.

The speed at which the climate crisis has arrived is astonishing: you may think of global warming as a legacy of the Industrial Revolution, but in fact half of all emissions from the burning of fossil fuels have come in the last 25 years.

This means we have done more damage to the climate since Al Gore published his first book on the subject than in all the millennia before; more since the premiere of Seinfeld than in human history before; more since the UN established the IPCC than ever before.

The establishment of the IPCC signaled the problem of global warming unmistakably to all the nations of the world, which means that we have now engineered more damage to the environment and its ability to support human life knowingly than we ever managed in ignorance.
There is more in that thread.


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Re: Climate Change

#438

Post by Volkonski » Fri Jan 11, 2019 11:31 am

The good news is that I will soon own waterfront property. :?

Along the East Coast, rainy days, high tides and sea rise make floods a part of life

https://www.nbcnews.com/mach/news/east- ... d_nn_tw_ma
From 1900 to 2017, sea levels rose about a foot and a half along the Chesapeake Bay, compared to one foot in New York City and Miami, according to a December 2018 study by researchers at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts.
Ocean Warming Is Accelerating Faster Than Thought, New Research Finds

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/10/clim ... hange.html
A new analysis, published Thursday in the journal Science, found that the oceans are heating up 40 percent faster on average than a United Nations panel estimated five years ago. The researchers also concluded that ocean temperatures have broken records for several straight years.

2018 is going to be the warmest year on record for the Earth’s oceans,” said Zeke Hausfather, an energy systems analyst at the independent climate research group Berkeley Earth and an author of the study. “As 2017 was the warmest year, and 2016 was the warmest year.”


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Re: Climate Change

#439

Post by Volkonski » Tue Jan 15, 2019 9:51 pm

Ice loss from Antarctica has sextupled since the 1970s, new research finds

https://www.washingtonpost.com/energy-e ... c3d0f22060
Antarctic glaciers have been melting at an accelerating pace over the past four decades thanks to an influx of warm ocean water — a startling new finding that researchers say could mean sea levels are poised to rise more quickly than predicted in coming decades.

The Antarctic lost 40 billion tons of melting ice to the ocean each year from 1979 to 1989. That figure rose to 252 billion tons lost per year beginning in 2009, according to a study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. That means the region is losing six times as much ice as it was four decades ago, an unprecedented pace in the era of modern measurements. (It takes about 360 billion tons of ice to produce one millimeter of global sea-level rise.)

“I don’t want to be alarmist,” said Eric Rignot, an Earth-systems scientist for the University of California at Irvine and NASA who led the work. But he said the weaknesses that researchers have detected in East Antarctica — home to the largest ice sheet on the planet — deserve deeper study.

“The places undergoing changes in Antarctica are not limited to just a couple places,” Rignot said. “They seem to be more extensive than what we thought. That, to me, seems to be reason for concern.”


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Re: Climate Change

#440

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Tue Jan 15, 2019 10:37 pm

Is it possible for the Atlantic Ocean to rise near Mar-a-lago just enough to submerge it without covering anything else nearby? :confused:


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Re: Climate Change

#441

Post by RTH10260 » Wed Jan 16, 2019 12:03 am

Tiredretiredlawyer wrote:
Tue Jan 15, 2019 10:37 pm
Is it possible for the Atlantic Ocean to rise near Mar-a-lago just enough to submerge it without covering anything else nearby? :confused:
You ought to ask for one of those local sinkholes to appear at that Floridian location :lol:



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Re: Climate Change

#442

Post by ZekeB » Wed Jan 16, 2019 6:45 am

Not while he's president. He'd consider it as the Camp David II vacation spot and have it filled with emergency federal funds.


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Re: Climate Change

#443

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Wed Jan 16, 2019 9:35 am

RTH10260 wrote:
Wed Jan 16, 2019 12:03 am
Tiredretiredlawyer wrote:
Tue Jan 15, 2019 10:37 pm
Is it possible for the Atlantic Ocean to rise near Mar-a-lago just enough to submerge it without covering anything else nearby? :confused:
You ought to ask for one of those local sinkholes to appear at that Floridian location :lol:
Fabulous idea!!!! AND more physically possible. :thumbs:


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Re: Climate Change

#444

Post by Lani » Thu Jan 17, 2019 12:50 am

NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
:crying: :yikes:
The world's most popular coffee species are going extinct. And scientists say we are to blame

(CNN) — Savor that cup of coffee while you can. New research shows 60% of coffee species found in the wild could soon go extinct.

Researchers at Kew Royal Botanic Gardens in the UK warn that climate change, deforestation, droughts and plant diseases are putting the future of coffee at risk.

"The important thing to remember is that coffee requires a forest habitat for its survival," senior researcher Aaron P. Davis told CNN. "With so much deforestation going on around the world, wild coffee species are being impacted at an alarming rate."

Davis added that coffee plants grow in very specific natural habitats, so rising temperatures and increased rainfall brought by climate change can make coffee impossible to grow in places the plants once thrived.
https://www-m.cnn.com/2019/01/16/health ... uggestions


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Re: Climate Change

#445

Post by Volkonski » Thu Jan 17, 2019 11:05 am

I drink tea. What about the tea? :?


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Re: Climate Change

#446

Post by Volkonski » Thu Jan 17, 2019 11:39 am

Brian Schatz

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In today's @WSJ there is a joint statement from 4 former fed chairs, 27 Nobel Laureate economists, and 14 former chairs of the Council of Economic Advisers in favor of climate action. We need a Green New Deal and a price on carbon. The only thing in our way is elected R's.


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