Climate Change

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Volkonski
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Re: Climate Change

#401

Post by Volkonski » Thu Sep 06, 2018 12:00 pm


Eric Holthaus

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Just out: Last month was the hottest August in recorded history for the Northeast.


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Re: Climate Change

#402

Post by TollandRCR » Sat Sep 15, 2018 2:01 pm

From a link in Little Green Footballs, one approach to the climate change problem:
https://noblesseoblige.org/2018/09/08/a ... ng-part-1/

There was a time when climate change was not a political football. This might be a way back there.


“The truth is, we know so little about life, we don’t really know what the good news is and what the bad news is.” Kurt Vonnegut

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Re: Climate Change

#403

Post by Volkonski » Mon Oct 08, 2018 11:41 am


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Humanity risks "unthinkable damage" on global warming, U.N. warns in new report
Here on the North Fork it won't take very much sea level rise to make Orient and Greenport into islands. Orient is attached by a 250 foot wide sandbar. Greenport is attached by a 450 foot wide section of beach, parking lot and roadway.


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Re: Climate Change

#404

Post by HST's Ghost » Mon Oct 08, 2018 8:53 pm

Trump administration sees a 7-degree rise in global temperatures by 2100
(And has no plans to do anything about it...)
Last month, deep in a 500-page environmental impact statement, the Trump administration made a startling assumption: On its current course, the planet will warm a disastrous seven degrees by the end of this century.

A rise of seven degrees Fahrenheit, or about four degrees Celsius, compared with preindustrial levels would be catastrophic, according to scientists. Many coral reefs would dissolve in increasingly acidic oceans. Parts of Manhattan and Miami would be underwater without costly coastal defenses. Extreme heat waves would routinely smother large parts of the globe.

But the administration did not offer this dire forecast, premised on the idea that the world will fail to cut its greenhouse gas emissions, as part of an argument to combat climate change. Just the opposite: The analysis assumes the planet’s fate is already sealed.
:snippity:
The world would have to make deep cuts in carbon emissions to avoid this drastic warming, the analysis states. And that “would require substantial increases in technology innovation and adoption compared to today’s levels and would require the economy and the vehicle fleet to move away from the use of fossil fuels, which is not currently technologically feasible or economically feasible.”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/national ... story.html?


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Re: Climate Change

#405

Post by RTH10260 » Mon Oct 08, 2018 9:32 pm

Yeah - I think it's time to secure that beach property in Kansas :twisted:



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Re: Climate Change

#406

Post by RVInit » Mon Oct 08, 2018 9:45 pm

I am always sorry when I read this thread. My faith in humans as a whole is completely gone.


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Re: Climate Change

#407

Post by TollandRCR » Tue Oct 09, 2018 5:40 am

The report of the IPCC panel is being read as if a step function describes climate change: act responsibly within the next 12 years and your planet will remain habitable. .

There may well be step functions in climate change -- collapse of the Ross Ice Shelf comes to mind. But the IPCC panel is not tellng us that everything will be pretty much like today if we just act within 12 years. It is tellng us that if we persist in business as usual, within 12 years things will be pretty rough.

Understanding climate change projections requires understanding that changes in mean global temperature are not saying that change will be uniform around the planet. Instead, some places will be at the end of the distribution -- much warmer or for some, (yes) cooler. Not everybody is ready to understand variance, skewness, and kurtosis. They might be thinking that IPCC is saying we should expect a global temperature increase about the same as the difference between Key West and Miami. So why all the excitement? It is because change will be much more pronounced in some places.


“The truth is, we know so little about life, we don’t really know what the good news is and what the bad news is.” Kurt Vonnegut

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Re: Climate Change

#408

Post by Dave at Sea » Tue Oct 09, 2018 8:50 am

"I love a sunburnt country,
A land of sweeping plains
Of ragged mountain ranges
Of droughts and flooding rains.
I love her far horizons
I love her jewel-sea,
Her beauty and her terror –
The wide brown land for me!"

Except from: My Country by Dorothea Mackellar 1908

I rather that it didn't get more unpredictable!

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-10-09/f ... n=politics



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Re: Climate Change

#409

Post by Dave at Sea » Tue Oct 09, 2018 8:54 am

Oh and if you think it is just your government that is wanting to embrace a 2nd dark age of ignorance and fear of cause and effect then you are not alone..

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-10-09/e ... w/10354604

coal politics... :sick:



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Re: Climate Change

#410

Post by Volkonski » Tue Oct 16, 2018 5:49 pm


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News about climate change has grown increasingly bleak in recent weeks. Now, scientists have acknowledged their predictions on the regional effects of climate change are flawed and things could be far worse than they previously expected. http://ow.ly/mH7Z30mgaQz
In fact, the researchers say their simulations show exactly the opposite – slightly decreasing air pressure. The findings raise serious doubts as to the accuracy of climate predictions for the United Kingdom and Western Europe, since their weather is closely linked to pressure changes over Greenland.

Climatologists believe record wet summers across England like those experienced in 2007 and 2012 could become commonplace if the Greenland blocking pattern continues to strengthen. However, no one will see it coming because of the faulty simulation programs, the researchers said.

“These differences between the estimates from the current climate models and observations suggests that the models cannot accurately represent recent conditions or predict future changes in Greenland climate,” said lead researcher Edward Hanna of the University of Lincoln’s School of Geography. “While there is natural variability in the climate system, we think that the recent rapid warming over Greenland since the early 1990s is not being fully simulated by the models, and that this misrepresentation could mean that future changes in atmospheric circulation and the jet stream over the wider North Atlantic region may not be properly simulated.”

Making the situation even more dire, the researchers have also concluded current models of melting on the Greenland Ice Sheet – which covers 80 percent of the surface of the world’s largest island – may be flawed as well, and may significantly underestimate how much sea levels will rise by 2100.


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Re: Climate Change

#411

Post by Volkonski » Thu Oct 18, 2018 6:02 pm



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Re: Climate Change

#412

Post by Addie » Tue Oct 23, 2018 10:58 am

The Guardian
Politicians say nothing, but US farmers are increasingly terrified by it – climate change

Research forecasts Iowa corn yields could drop in half within the next half-century thanks to extreme weather – yet it’s not part of the political conversation ...


It’s the least debated issue of the midterm political season. The weather is the top topic of conversation at any cooperative elevator’s coffee table, along with the markets. Everyone knows that things have been changing in sweeping ways out here on the richest corn ground in the world. It’s drought in the spring and floods in the fall – what were considered 500-year floods in Cedar Rapids and Des Moines 30 years ago are now considered 100-year floods. Iowa has been getting soggier in spring and fall, with scary dry spells interspersed, and more humid at night by as much as a third since 1980.

Everyone knows it has been getting wetter and weirder, especially Dr Gene Takle, a Nobel prize-winning climate scientist at Iowa State University. Takle predicted 20 years ago the floods we see today, already linking it to climate change back then. Farmers just saw ponding and called the tiling company to install more. We’re on our way to doubling the size of the northern Iowa drainage system in the past 30 years as the upper midwest has grown more humid and extreme.

This drainage system is delivering runoff rich in farm fertilizer to the Mississippi river complex and the Gulf of Mexico, where the nitrate from Iowa and Illinois corn fields is growing a dead zone the size of New Jersey. The shrimping industry is being deprived of oxygen so Iowa farmers can chase 200 bushels of corn per acre – and hope against hope that corn will somehow increase in price as we plow up every last acre.

That flow also is creating a toxic source for Des Moines Water Works, which is facing up to $100m in improvements to remove agricultural chemicals from the Raccoon river that supplies 500,000 thirsty denizens. The waterworks sued our county over it, along with two others, but a federal judge threw out the case because you simply can’t sue an Iowa drainage district. And that means that there is no way to regulate agriculture as it responds to extreme weather and market consolidation that seeks immediate return.

Meanwhile, those huge rainfalls on exposed black dirt wash it to the vales even from the flat ground of our neighborhood. We are losing soil at two to three tons an acre a year. Nature can regenerate the soil at only a half-ton a year. So we are washing our black gold down the river four to six times faster than we can regrow it.



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Re: Climate Change

#413

Post by Volkonski » Thu Nov 01, 2018 3:11 pm

This is not good news. (Is there ever any good news about the world's climate?)

Climate change: Oceans 'soaking up more heat than estimated'


According to the last major assessment by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the world's oceans have taken up over 90% of the excess heat trapped by greenhouse gases.

:snippity:

"A warmer ocean will hold less oxygen, and that has implications for marine ecosystems," said Dr Resplandy.

"There is also sea level, if you warm the ocean more you will have more thermal expansion and therefore more sea level rise."

:snippity:

"When the ocean warms, the amount of these gases that the ocean is able to hold goes down," said Dr Resplandy.
Also, warmer oceans mean more powerful storms.


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Re: Climate Change

#414

Post by Lani » Fri Nov 02, 2018 8:13 pm

I thought we had a separate thread on the topic of the lawsuit brought by Our Children’s Trust, but I can't find it. :crying:

Here's the good news:
BREAKING: High Court Removes Red Light For Kids' Climate Trial
The U.S. Supreme Court late Friday lifted a stay on a suit brought by 21 children accusing the federal government of pushing policies that will worsen climate change-related dangers, clearing the way for a landmark constitutional trial to begin in Oregon federal court but also leaving room for the Ninth Circuit to decide the case's future.
From an email, so no linky.


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Re: Climate Change

#415

Post by Volkonski » Wed Nov 28, 2018 7:32 pm

What is Trump's gut telling him about this? :madguy:



Great Barrier Reef: record heatwave may cause another coral bleaching event
42.6C temperature in Cairns broke a November record that has stood since 1900 by 5.4C


:shock:
Extreme weather fuelled more than 130 bushfires, which the premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said on Twitter was “not the kind of fire we have seen in Queensland before”.

“Heatwave records and fire weather is unprecedented,” Palaszczuk said.

A dust storm, brought by strong westerly winds, covered the southern inland parts of the state. In the north, thousands of native flying foxes died due to the high temperatures.

Reef scientist Terry Hughes, from the coral centre of excellence at James Cook University, said the summer heatwave was “terrifying” and lifted the chances of coral death on the Great Barrier Reef early next year.


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Re: Climate Change

#416

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Wed Nov 28, 2018 7:46 pm

Who cares? It's in a small ocean far, far away.


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Re: Climate Change

#417

Post by AndyinPA » Wed Nov 28, 2018 7:54 pm

I can't imagine losing the Great Barrier Reef. I got to swim in it about eight years ago, which was an awesome experience.

And we were very lucky as we were there, I think in March, so going into their autumn. There had been horrendous floods the year before we were there. The upside to that was that the desert was in bloom and we were surrounded by glorious color. Our program manager for the tour said he had been going there for more than twenty years and had never seen it anywhere near as spectacular as when we were there.

It's so sad to think that so many wonderful things in the world that we have taken for granted may soon be gone.



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Re: Climate Change

#418

Post by Volkonski » Thu Nov 29, 2018 10:43 am

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Past four years hottest on record, data shows

9:41 AM - 29 Nov 2018


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Re: Climate Change

#419

Post by Volkonski » Sat Dec 08, 2018 10:21 am

'We live in a lobstocracy': Maine town is feeling the effects of climate change

https://www.theguardian.com/environment ... 1544269715
According to a report released earlier this year from the Gulf of Maine Research Institute (GMRI) in Portland, while the lobster population has risen over 500% along Maine’s coast over the past 30 years, the population is expected to drop by between 40% and 62% by 2050.

Climate change has already hit lobster populations in states south of Maine, seeing once-robust lobster fisheries in Massachusetts, Rhode Island – and even Connecticut, New Jersey and New York – decline.

:snippity:

Losing the industry would be devastating. Previously, Stonington had other fisheries – such as for groundfish like cod, haddock and flounder. Ted Ames, a retired Stonington fisherman, saw all of those fisheries collapse over the decades, but when they did, fishermen always turned to something else to make a living. Today, lobsters are everything.

:snippity:

“There’s only so much our lobstermen can do,” said GMRIs Pershing. “If the rest of the world doesn’t get a handle on carbon, the coast of Maine is going to look really different in 2080.”
Image

Today there are no brands of Maine sardines.

Don't go looking for this product-

Image

Maine's shrimp fishing has been shut down since 2013.

Image


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Re: Climate Change

#420

Post by Volkonski » Sat Dec 08, 2018 10:31 am

Proposed cut for herring harvest could affect lobster catch

https://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/pro ... h-59683100
The commercial fishery for herring is a major industry in the Atlantic states, where the little fish is important as lobster bait and is also eaten by people. The fish has been under the microscope of regulators and conservation groups recently after a scientific assessment said earlier this year that the fish's population has fallen in the past five years.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said it wants to cut the annual catch limit from nearly 110 million pounds (50 million kilograms) this year to less than half that in 2019. The agency said in a statement that the deep cut is needed to "prevent overfishing."

:snippity:

The decline in the herring population has drawn the attention of ocean managers in part because of the fish's importance in the ocean food chain. Herring is an important prey species for whales, sea birds, larger fish and other marine life.

Exactly why its population has dipped recently in something scientists are researching now, said Carrie Nordeen, a fishery policy analyst for NOAA Fisheries.


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Re: Climate Change

#421

Post by Whatever4 » Sat Dec 08, 2018 11:02 am

Volkonski wrote:
Sat Dec 08, 2018 10:21 am
Image

Today there are no brands of Maine sardines.
There’s no brands of US sardines at all anymore. But Maine used to have over 500 brands. The Maine State Museum in Augusta has a nifty exhibit on sardine canning, including the equipment used to cook the cans, and a wall of lids showing hundreds of brands.

Most sardines here are now used as lobster bait. The lobster fishermen are really hurting from the tariffs. Not only are lobsters subject to tariffs, but so is the steel used in the traps. The Canadian lobstermen down the coast aren’t subject to tariffs, so things have gotten a bit tense out there.


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Re: Climate Change

#422

Post by Volkonski » Sat Dec 08, 2018 12:24 pm

It is not just Maine.

A New Lawsuit Blames the Trump Administration for Ruining Oysters
By failing to document the effects of acidification in coastal waters


https://www.motherjones.com/food/2018/1 ... fishermen/
In 2007, the Whiskey Creek Shellfish Hatchery in Tillamook, Oregon lost 75 percent of its oyster larvae. The oyster farmers initially thought it was disease, but that didn’t explain the monumental loss. With help from scientists, they finally pieced together the culprit: The ocean had absorbed an increasing amount of carbon dioxide from the air, changing the water’s pH to make it more acidic.

The problem of ocean acidification has only grown in the state’s coastal waters in the years since, as a recent report by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife documents. Now, the conservation nonprofit the Center for Biological Diversity is suing the Trump administration for failing to recognize the effects of ocean acidification on the marine animals and shellfish along the Oregon coast.


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Re: Climate Change

#423

Post by Volkonski » Sat Dec 08, 2018 2:04 pm

The Maine shrimp fishing shutdown was extended for another 3 years last month. They have even stopped the small scale shrimp harvesting done for research purposes.

So far the shrimp population is not recovering despite the fishing ban. Warmer waters are probably to blame.

The outlook is bad. Maine shrimping may never restart. :(

Maine shrimp were so flavorful. I ate canned maine shrimp frequently growing up in Massachusetts. Usually in shrimp salad sandwiches.

Also just about gone from New England waters are the once abundant smelts. The two inexpensive fish options we always had for sale at the grocery store I worked in were salt codfish and fresh smelts.


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Re: Climate Change

#424

Post by Addie » Mon Dec 10, 2018 8:12 am

Cross-posting

The Guardian
Tackle climate or face financial crash, say world's biggest investors

UN summit urged to end all coal burning and introduce substantial taxes on emissions ...


Lord Nicholas Stern, of the London School of Economics said: “The low-carbon economy is the growth story of the 21st century and it is inclusive growth. Without that story, we would not have got the 2015 Paris agreement, but the story has grown stronger and stronger and is really compelling now.”

The US Trump administration will hold its only event at the UN summit on Monday and is expected to promote “clean coal”. But Stern said Trump’s suggestion that action on climate change was a jobs killer was “dead wrong”. Stern said: “You don’t create jobs for the 21st century by trying to whistle up jobs from the 19th century.”

A key demand of the Global Investor Statement is to phase out coal-fired power stations across the world. Peter Damgaard Jensen, the CEO of Danish pension fund PKA, said: “Investors, including PKA, are moving out of coal in their droves given its devastating effects on the climate and public health, compounded by its poor financial performance.”

Dozens of nations will affirm their commitment to end their coal burning on Thursday. However, the UN summit has seen US, Chinese and Japanese financial institutions cited as leaders in providing nearly $500bn in backing for new coal plants since the Paris agreement was signed.



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Re: Climate Change

#425

Post by Volkonski » Tue Dec 11, 2018 6:15 pm

Warming in Arctic Raises Fears of a ‘Rapid Unraveling’ of the Region

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/11/clim ... rming.html
Persistent warming in the Arctic is pushing the region into “uncharted territory” and increasingly affecting the continental United States, scientists said Tuesday.

“We’re seeing this continued increase of warmth pervading across the entire Arctic system,” said Emily Osborne, an official with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, who presented the agency’s annual assessment of the state of the region, the “Arctic Report Card.”

The Arctic has been warmer over the last five years than at any time since records began in 1900, the report found, and the region is warming at twice the rate as the rest of the planet.

Dr. Osborne, the lead editor of the report and manager of NOAA’s Arctic Research Program, said the Arctic was undergoing its “most unprecedented transition in human history.”


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