Coronavirus: Health Care Industry

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Addie
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Re: Coronavirus: Health Care Industry

#376

Post by Addie »

Axios: The coronavirus pandemic hasn't stopped drug price increases
Adding:
Newsweek: Remdesivir Will Cost $780 More If You Have Private Insurance Vs. Medicare
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Re: Coronavirus: Health Care Industry

#377

Post by ZekeB »

Addie wrote:
Mon Jun 29, 2020 1:23 pm
Axios: The coronavirus pandemic hasn't stopped drug price increases
Adding:
Newsweek: Remdesivir Will Cost $780 More If You Have Private Insurance Vs. Medicare
Conservatives have death panels. They only go about doing it a little differently than how Palin presented the process.
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Re: Coronavirus: Health Care Industry

#378

Post by Addie »

CNN: People with coronavirus are crossing the US-Mexico border for medical care ...

The rise in ambulance traffic from the border, which several officials described to CNN, is a symptom of the pandemic's spread in the region -- and a sign of the many connections between communities in both countries.

"There just is not a wall for viruses at the border," says Josiah Heyman, director of the Center for Inter-American and Border Studies at the University of Texas at El Paso. "The wall is an illusion, because the two sides are really woven together."

An increase in cross-border coronavirus cases, which began getting public attention in May, overwhelmed some California hospitals and spurred the state to create a new patient transfer system to help. ...

In the past five weeks, more than 500 patients have been transferred to hospitals across the state from California's Imperial County, which has the state's highest per capita rate of coronavirus cases -- and, according to officials, has seen a large number of patients crossing from Mexico.

But Van Gorder, Coyle and other officials in California say this isn't an immigration issue.

Most of the coronavirus patients crossing the border, they say, are Americans. ...

Officials estimate about a quarter of a million US citizens live across the border in the Mexican state of Baja California. Many work in the US and have family members there. Some regularly go to US hospitals when they need medical attention. Others decided to cross this time because Mexican hospitals were overwhelmed by a crush of coronavirus cases.

"What has happened as the situation has worsened on the Mexican side of the line is that a number of the US citizens are returning to the United States to seek care for Covid-19," says Coyle of the California Hospital Association.

Officials in Mexico's Baja California state say the number of active coronavirus cases there are now declining. But the state -- which is home to large cities like Tijuana and Mexicali -- has been hit hard by the pandemic. With more than 1,700 dead, it's among the Mexican states with the highest Covid-19 death tolls and death rates per capita.
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Re: Coronavirus: Health Care Industry

#379

Post by RTH10260 »

Did the US commander-in-chief look that his troops would get protection first?
CanSino's COVID-19 Vaccine Candidate Approved for Military Use in China
By Reuters
June 29, 2020

BEIJING — China's military has received the greenlight to use a COVID-19 vaccine candidate developed by its research unit and CanSino Biologics after clinical trials proved it was safe and showed some efficacy, the company said on Monday.

The Ad5-nCoV is one of China's eight vaccine candidates approved for human trials at home and abroad for the respiratory disease caused by the new coronavirus. The shot also won approval for human testing in Canada.

China's Central Military Commission approved the use of the vaccine by the military on June 25 for a period of one year, CanSino said in a filing. The vaccine candidate was developed jointly by CanSino and a research institute at the Academy of Military Science (AMS).

"The Ad5-nCoV is currently limited to military use only and its use cannot be expanded to a broader vaccination range without the approval of the Logistics Support Department," CanSino said, referring to the Central Military Commission department which approved the military use of the vaccine.



https://www.nytimes.com/reuters/2020/06 ... ccine.html

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Re: Coronavirus: Health Care Industry

#380

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Gilead sets price of coronavirus drug remdesivir at $3,120 as Trump administration secures supply for 500,000 patients
The antiviral remdesivir was shown to shorten recovery times for coronavirus patients in clinical trials, though it had a marginal impact on death rates.

Hannah Denham, Yasmeen Abutaleb and Christopher Rowland
June 29, 2020 at 8:12 p.m. GMT+2

Gilead Sciences, the maker of the first covid-19 treatment found to have worked in clinical trials, remdesivir, said Monday it will charge U.S. hospitals $3,120 for the typical patient with private insurance.

Soon after the announcement, the Trump administration said it had secured nearly all of the company’s supply of the drug for use in U.S. hospitals through September, with a contract for 500,000 treatment courses, which it will make available to hospitals at Gilead’s price.

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Other developed countries will pay 25 percent less than the United States, a discount Gilead said reflects a need to make the drug as widely available as possible throughout the world.

The company has licensed generic manufacturers to produce the drug for developing countries, which will receive the treatment “at a substantially lower cost,” the company said.

Gilead’s announcement settles a lingering question about a drug that has been shown to have a modest benefit but remains the only therapy authorized by the Food and Drug Administration to treat hospitalized patients with covid-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus. A clinical trial sponsored by the government showed the drug — invented by Gilead but developed largely by taxpayer-funded agencies — sped up hospital recoveries by four days. It had no statistically significant impact on survival for covid-19 patients.

Setting a price for a novel drug in the middle of a pandemic posed an unprecedented challenge, Gilead said. Cutting four days of hospital costs for each patient saves the U.S. health system $12,000 per patient, the company said. Based on that benchmark, it suggested it could have justified a higher price.



https://www.washingtonpost.com/business ... oronavirus

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Re: Coronavirus: Health Care Industry

#381

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KTRK: Saturated Houston hospitals transferring COVID-19 patients to other cities


HOUSTON, Texas (KTRK) -- Harris Health Systems, the public health agency that operates Ben Taub and LBJ hospitals, is sending COVID-19 patients to facilities outside of the area in an effort to cope with the growing healthcare crisis.

Charlie McMurray-Horton, the associate administrator for Clinical Integration and Transformation at Harris Health, spoke to ABC13 about the capacity issues affecting Harris Health hospitals this afternoon.

"It really has intensified in the last month or so," said McMurray-Horton. "We are actively trying to transfer out ICU and surge patients that are COVID positive and under investigation, just because we don't have the capacity to treat those patients," McMurray-Horton added.

Harris Health Systems said it has transferred patients to UTMB in Galveston, the Woodlands, and as far away as Conroe. The scramble to find beds for patients also has a trickle down effect.

For a week now, Houston Fire Chief Sam Pena has spoken out about the longer transfer time for patients firefighters bring by ambulance. A normal transfer time may take approximately 20 minutes. In the past three weeks, data shows on more than 560 occasions, firefighters were holding their ambulance patients for more than an hour.
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Re: Coronavirus: Health Care Industry

#382

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Houston has the largest hospital community in the world. :cry:
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Re: Coronavirus: Health Care Industry

#383

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Associated Press: Hollowed out public health system faces more cuts amid virus


The U.S. public health system has been starved for decades and lacks the resources to confront the worst health crisis in a century.

Marshaled against a virus that has sickened at least 2.6 million in the U.S., killed more than 126,000 people and cost tens of millions of jobs and $3 trillion in federal rescue money, state and local government health workers on the ground are sometimes paid so little, they qualify for public aid.

They track the coronavirus on paper records shared via fax. Working seven-day weeks for months on end, they fear pay freezes, public backlash and even losing their jobs.

Since 2010, spending for state public health departments has dropped by 16% per capita and spending for local health departments has fallen by 18%, according to a KHN and Associated Press analysis of government spending on public health. At least 38,000 state and local public health jobs have disappeared since the 2008 recession, leaving a skeletal workforce for what was once viewed as one of the world’s top public health systems. ...

States, cities and counties in dire straits have begun laying off and furloughing their limited staff, and even more devastation looms, as states reopen and cases surge. Historically, even when money pours in following crises such as Zika and H1N1, it disappears after the emergency subsides. Officials fear the same thing is happening now.

“We don’t say to the fire department, ‘Oh, I’m sorry. There were no fires last year, so we’re going to take 30% of your budget away.’ That would be crazy, right?” said Dr. Gianfranco Pezzino, the health officer in Shawnee County, Kansas. “But we do that with public health, day in and day out.”
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Re: Coronavirus: Health Care Industry

#384

Post by Addie »

CNN goes inside Texas hospital being overwhelmed by coronavirus patients


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Re: Coronavirus: Health Care Industry

#385

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Pfizer reports encouraging early coronavirus vaccine data
In a small trial, an experimental vaccine triggered immune responses similar to those in recovered patients

Carolyn Y. Johnson
July 1, 2020 at 11:34 p.m. GMT+2

An experimental coronavirus vaccine being developed by pharmaceutical giant Pfizer and the German firm BioNTech triggered stronger immune responses in recipients than those seen in people naturally recovering from an infection in a small study published online Wednesday.

The work has not yet been peer-reviewed, and it is still unclear what level of immune response will protect a person from getting sick. But outside scientists praised the company for publishing the data on 45 people, and said the results support moving to a larger clinical trial to test whether the vaccine is safe and effective.

“It’s the first positive data I’ve seen coming out of Operation Warp Speed,” said Peter Jay Hotez, dean for the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine, referring to the U.S. government effort to speed up the development, testing and production of multiple coronavirus vaccines. “I’m really happy Pfizer took the initiative to publish it, whereas the others haven’t. I think we need to see more of this.”


https://www.washingtonpost.com/health/2 ... cine-data/

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Re: Coronavirus: Health Care Industry

#386

Post by ZekeB »

I read the report. The sample size was miniscule compared to what's needed to get some reliable data. If trump had this report he'd be telling us that Covid-19 will be erased next week.
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Re: Coronavirus: Health Care Industry

#387

Post by RTH10260 »

ZekeB wrote:
Thu Jul 02, 2020 4:41 pm
I read the report. The sample size was miniscule compared to what's needed to get some reliable data. If trump had this report he'd be telling us that Covid-19 will be erased next week.
But he needs this tidbit of flase hope that he can claim that massproduction will be running by November and that by beginning of next year everyone can queue up for His Vaccine. Assuming that some deplorables still believe and vote for him :blackeye:

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Re: Coronavirus: Health Care Industry

#388

Post by Frater I*I »

I see this as the drug company trying to hype this so that it can continue to pump the market up, therefore keeping the price of it's shares up.
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Re: Coronavirus: Health Care Industry

#389

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WaPo: As coronavirus rebounds, more patients are being hospitalized and capacity is stretched


Patients suffering from covid-19 are rapidly filling hospitals across the South and West, with Mississippi, Tennessee, Texas, Nevada and Arizona setting records for hospitalizations Thursday, a sign that the coronavirus pandemic is entering a dangerous new phase.

In Arizona, where the virus appears to be spreading out of control, hospitals rushed to expand capacity and adopted practices similar to those employed at the height of the outbreak in New York City and Italy, including doubling up hospital beds in rooms, pausing elective surgeries and bringing in health-care workers from other states.

Perhaps most chillingly, at the urging of doctors and advisers, state officials this week activated “crisis standards of care” protocols, which determine for hospitals which patients get ventilators and care as the system becomes overwhelmed under the crush of patients. ...

Deaths, which had declined steadily for several months, also are rising. States reported that 700 people died Thursday of covid-19 — an increase of more than 25 percent compared to the previous seven-day average. ...

“There’s a lag between confirmed case and hospitalization, and between hospitalization and death. So you look at the numbers and you can see how hospital capacity could quickly become strained in coming weeks,” said Saskia Popescu, an epidemiologist at the University of Arizona.

The fear is that the same will soon happen in states such as Arizona, Texas and Florida as their health-care systems are strained to capacity. In Arizona, if hospitalizations push past capacity, patients will be given a score based on life expectancy and underlying conditions.

“You look at what happened in Lombardy, Italy. What happened in New York. That’s what is about to happen here. People are going to die because our system is overwhelmed,” said Will Humble, who was director of Arizona’s Department of Health Services for six years under its previous Republican governor. “It’s important for other states to learn from us. This wasn’t bad luck. It was avoidable. Don’t let this happen to you. You look back at the past few months and we’re an example of what not to do.”
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Re: Coronavirus: Health Care Industry

#390

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Addie wrote:
Thu Jul 02, 2020 10:16 pm
WaPo: As coronavirus rebounds, more patients are being hospitalized and capacity is stretched
:snippity:
“You look at what happened in Lombardy, Italy. What happened in New York. That’s what is about to happen here. People are going to die because our system is overwhelmed,” said Will Humble, who was director of Arizona’s Department of Health Services for six years under its previous Republican governor. “It’s important for other states to learn from us. This wasn’t bad luck. It was avoidable. Don’t let this happen to you. You look back at the past few months and we’re an example of what not to do.”
Where is the renewed call for flattening the curve :?:

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Re: Coronavirus: Health Care Industry

#391

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WaPo: More covid-19 patients are surviving ventilators in the ICU


An increasing number of U.S. covid-19 patients are surviving after they are placed on mechanical ventilators, a last-resort measure that was perceived as a signal of impending death during the terrifying early days of the pandemic. ...

We’ve learned a lot about covid since the beginning of the year,” said Russell G. Buhr, a pulmonary and critical care physician at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center. “That means we have a significantly better understanding of how to diagnose, recognize and manage this.”

Buhr’s hospital is still putting together data, but he said the mortality rate for ventilated patients is in the 30 percent to 50 percent range. That is about the same as the rate for people who develop acute respiratory distress syndrome, the dangerous buildup of fluid in the tiny air sacs of the lungs caused by diseases such as pneumonia, or injuries such as those suffered in car accidents. ...

“This is a brand new disease we’d never seen before,” said Leora Horwitz, an associate professor of population health and medicine at NYU Langone Health. “We’re generally learning to recognize who needs to be intubated and who doesn’t. We’re avoiding intubation where we can. We’re learning proning,” the technique of placing patients on their stomachs to help them breathe. “We’re learning about blood clots.”

At the NYU hospital, 60 percent of patients placed on ventilators between March 1 and May 5 died, according to a paper Horwitz and others published in the BMJ medical journal.“It’s never going to be 10 to 20 percent. Let’s not kid ourselves,” Horwitz said. “The people who are sick enough to be put on ventilators, they’re really sick.”
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Re: Coronavirus: Health Care Industry

#392

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ABC News: 'The threat is real': Miami hospital flooded with critical COVID patients

Krystal Spaulding is almost out of breath as she sprints from one critically ill patient to another at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami. Coronavirus cases are increasing at an alarming rate and the hospital is seeing more and more patients every day, the nurse said.

"There's just a lot of running around with this current wave of [COVID-19] that we're experiencing here in Miami," Spaulding told ABC News. "The patients seem to be way more critical than the first wave."

Florida reported over 10,000 new coronavirus cases on Wednesday, the biggest one-day increase in the state since the pandemic started.

As the state continues to shatter records for coronavirus cases amid the reopening of the economy, hospitals in Florida -- like Jackson Memorial -- are seeing a rise in hospitalizations. And as a safety net hospital, it is seeing more minority populations being infected with COVID.
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Re: Coronavirus: Health Care Industry

#393

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CNN: 2 Texas counties urge residents to shelter in place as hospitals reach capacity

Hospitals in at least two Texas counties are at full capacity heading into the Fourth of July holiday weekend, with county judges urging residents to shelter in place.

Judges in Starr and Hidalgo counties sent out emergency alerts Friday, warning residents that local hospitals in the Rio Grande Valley were at capacity.

Judge Eloy Vera said there have been 18 deaths in Starr County due to Covid-19 and two severely ill patients had to be flown out of the area for treatment. One of the patients was taken to San Antonio and the other to Dallas, the judge said in the post on Facebook. ...

"The local and valley hospitals are at full capacity and have no more beds available. I urge all of our residents to please shelter-in-place, wear face coverings, practice social distancing and AVOID GATHERINGS," he wrote.
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Re: Coronavirus: Health Care Industry

#394

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Associated Press: Hollowed out public health system faces more cuts amid virus

Fauci warns US could see 100,000 new coronavirus cases per day


(AP) - The U.S. public health system has been starved for decades and lacks the resources to confront the worst health crisis in a century.

Marshaled against a virus that has sickened at least 2.6 million in the U.S., killed more than 126,000 people and cost tens of millions of jobs and $3 trillion in federal rescue money, state and local government health workers on the ground are sometimes paid so little, they qualify for public aid.

They track the coronavirus on paper records shared via fax. Working seven-day weeks for months on end, they fear pay freezes, public backlash and even losing their jobs.

Since 2010, spending for state public health departments has dropped by 16% per capita and spending for local health departments has fallen by 18%, according to a KHN and Associated Press analysis of government spending on public health. At least 38,000 state and local public health jobs have disappeared since the 2008 recession, leaving a skeletal workforce for what was once viewed as one of the world’s top public health systems.

KHN, also known as Kaiser Health News, and AP interviewed more than 150 public health workers, policymakers and experts, analyzed spending records from hundreds of state and local health departments, and surveyed statehouses. On every level, the investigation found, the system is underfunded and under threat, unable to protect the nation's health.

Dr. Robert Redfield, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said in an interview in April that his "biggest regret" was "that our nation failed over decades to effectively invest in public health."

So when this outbreak arrived — and when, according to public health experts, the federal government bungled its response — hollowed-out state and local health departments were ill-equipped to step into the breach.
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Re: Coronavirus: Health Care Industry

#395

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Health experts push back on Trump’s false claim that 99 percent of U.S. infections are ‘totally harmless.’

Public health experts and officials on Sunday disputed President’s Trump’s characterization of the seriousness of the coronavirus.

In an Independence Day speech on Saturday at the White House, Mr. Trump sought to dismiss widespread criticism of his administration’s slow and ineffective response to the virus. He repeated his false claim that an abundance of testing made the country’s cases look worse than they were, and he asserted that 99 percent of the nation’s cases were “totally harmless.”


https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/05/worl ... k-71eaa206

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Re: Coronavirus: Health Care Industry

#396

Post by pipistrelle »

RTH10260 wrote:
Mon Jul 06, 2020 7:21 am
He repeated his false claim that an abundance of testing made the country’s cases look worse than they were, and he asserted that 99 percent of the nation’s cases were “totally harmless.”
https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/05/worl ... k-71eaa206
Just as it's coming out that some asymptomatic or mild cases are showing damage. Brilliant.

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Re: Coronavirus: Health Care Industry

#397

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My Name is...
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Re: Coronavirus: Health Care Industry

#398

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U.S. Will Pay $1.6 Billion to Novavax for Coronavirus Vaccine
The Maryland-based company, which has never brought a product to market before, just made the biggest deal to date with the Trump administration’s Operation Warp Speed.

By Katie Thomas
July 7, 2020, 6:00 a.m. ET

The federal government will pay the vaccine maker Novavax $1.6 billion to expedite the development of 100 million doses of a coronavirus vaccine by the beginning of next year, the company said on Tuesday.

The deal is the largest that the Trump administration has made so far with a company as part of Operation Warp Speed, the sprawling federal effort to make coronavirus vaccines and treatments available to the American public as quickly as possible. In doing so, the government has placed a significant bet on Novavax, a company based in Maryland that has never brought a product to market.

Operation Warp Speed is a multiagency effort that seeks to carry out President Trump’s pledge to make a coronavirus vaccine available by the end of the year, but the full extent of the project is still unclear. Officials have declined to list which vaccines and treatments are part of Operation Warp Speed.

In an interview on Sunday, Novavax’s president and chief executive, Stanley C. Erck, initially said he was not sure where in the government the $1.6 billion was coming from. A Novavax spokeswoman later said the money was coming from a “collaboration” between the Health and Human Services Department and the Defense Department.


https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/07/heal ... speed.html

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Re: Coronavirus: Health Care Industry

#399

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The Atlantic: The Pandemic Experts Are Not Okay

Many American public-health specialists are at risk of burning out as the coronavirus surges back.


Saskia Popescu’s phone buzzes throughout the night, waking her up. It had already buzzed 99 times before I interviewed her at 9:15 a.m. ET last Monday. It buzzed three times during the first 15 minutes of our call. Whenever a COVID-19 case is confirmed at her hospital system, Popescu gets an email, and her phone buzzes. She cannot silence it. An epidemiologist at the University of Arizona, Popescu works to prepare hospitals for outbreaks of emerging diseases. Her phone is now a miserable metronome, ticking out the rhythm of the pandemic ever more rapidly as Arizona’s cases climb. “It has almost become white noise,” she told me.

For many Americans, the coronavirus pandemic has become white noise—old news that has faded into the background of their lives. But the crisis is far from over. Arizona is one of the pandemic’s new hot spots, with 24,000 confirmed cases over the past week and rising hospitalizations and deaths. Popescu saw the surge coming, “but to actually see it play out is heartbreaking,” she said. “It didn’t have to be this way.”

Popescu is one of many public-health experts who have been preparing for and battling the pandemic since the start of the year. They’re not treating sick people, as doctors or nurses might be, but are instead advising policy makers, monitoring the pandemic’s movements, modeling its likely trajectory, and ensuring that hospitals are ready.

By now they are used to sharing their knowledge with journalists, but they’re less accustomed to talking about themselves. Many of them told me that they feel duty-bound and grateful to be helping their country at a time when so many others are ill or unemployed. But they’re also very tired, and dispirited by America’s continued inability to control a virus that many other nations have brought to heel. As the pandemic once again intensifies, so too does their frustration and fatigue.

America isn’t just facing a shortfall of testing kits, masks, or health-care workers. It is also looking at a drought of expertise, as the very people whose skills are sorely needed to handle the pandemic are on the verge of burning out.
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Re: Coronavirus: Health Care Industry

#400

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WaPo: The ‘Covid Cocktail’: Inside a Pa. nursing home that gave some veterans hydroxychloroquine even without covid-19 testing


SPRING CITY, Pa. — They wrapped the dead in body bags and raced back to treat the living, crammed into a nursing home that, day after day, played the somber sound of taps over the speaker system so the veterans who lived there had the chance to say goodbye.

The nurses and aides at the Southeastern Veterans’ Center in the suburbs of Philadelphia had watched so much go wrong since the start of the coronavirus pandemic. The communal dining that lasted into April, the nights that feverish patients were left to sleep beside roommates who weren’t sick yet. “Merry Christmas,” one nurse told another when they finally got N95 masks, weeks into the crisis and just before administrators stopped staffing the isolation rooms because too many people were feared infected.

But what worried some nurses most was what they called the “covid cocktail,” the widespread, off-label use of one of the antimalarial drugs touted by President Trump in March as a potentially game-changing treatment for covid-19.

For more than two weeks in April, a drug regimen that included hydroxychloroquine was routinely dispensed at the struggling center, often for patients who had not been tested for covid-19 and for those who suffered from medical conditions known to raise the risk of dangerous side effects, interviews, emails and medical notes and records obtained by The Washington Post show.
"The very least you can do in your life is to figure out what you hope for." - Barbara Kingsolver

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