Archaeology

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RTH10260
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Archaeology

#1

Post by RTH10260 » Mon Jul 22, 2019 9:54 am

Let' have a special thread for the very ancient stuff.



;) where Sterngard will especially feel at home

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RTH10260
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Re: Archaeology

#2

Post by RTH10260 » Mon Jul 22, 2019 9:59 am

Giant marble pyramid-shaped island complex rising from sea uncovered, revealing secrets of ancient Greece’s origins
Exclusive: Thousands of years of history being unlocked in the Aegean isles which could provide groundbreaking knowledge of ancient civilisations

David Keys Archaeology Correspondent
Tuesday 9 July 2019 17:45

Excavations on a tiny island in the Aegean Sea – 125 miles southeast of Athens – are revealing the earliest truly monumental complex of buildings ever unearthed anywhere in the Greek world.

Dating back 4,600 years, the site may also have been part of the inspiration for a key aspect of Greek religion – the idea that mountain tops were the dwelling places of the gods.

The complex – on a mountain peak-shaped islet off the coast of the Aegean island of Keros (part of the Cyclades archipelago) – is totally changing archaeologists’ understanding of prehistoric Greece.

Until now, nobody had realised the true scale of the complex – and the gargantuan effort that had gone into constructing it.

Archaeologists now believe that, in order to construct the complex, early Bronze Age Greeks embarked on at least 3,500 maritime voyages to transport between 7,000 and 10,000 tonnes of shining white marble from one Aegean island to another.

Each return voyage would have required up to 24 crew members to paddle for around five hours.

“It is by far the largest prehistoric marine transport operation that has ever come to light anywhere in the world,” said Dr Julian Whitewright, a leading maritime archaeologist at the University of Southampton.

“It demonstrates quite clearly just how important, and integral to their culture, seafaring was to these early Bronze Age Aegean people.”

The voyages – totalling around 45,000 miles – allowed the architects to construct what is thought to have been a huge religious sanctuary consisting of up to 60 marble buildings, which were constructed specifically to glisten in the sun.

What’s more, the architects “terra-formed” the pyramid-shaped island “mini-mountain”, known in recent centuries as Dhaskalio (possibly just meaning “islet”), to create around 1,000m of artificial terracing, arranged in six “steps” on its steep slopes.

These roughly six-metre wide terraces appear to have been built specifically to accommodate all the buildings. The summit itself was not initially built on – but instead had a small, probably sacred, open area where votive offerings may have been deposited.

“Our investigation has been transforming our understanding of early Bronze Age Cycladic culture and suggests that these very early Greeks were organisationally, technically and politically much more advanced than previously thought,” said the project’s co-director Michael Boyd, of Cambridge University’s McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research.

Nothing like this monumental complex has ever been found from this period in or around Greece before.

Although the current archaeological investigations on Dhaskalio have been going on for the past four years, it’s only more detailed examination of the resultant data over the past 12 months that has revealed the true scale of the complex, and the transport logistics and construction work associated with it.

But the remarkable nature of the site does fit into a much more widely dispersed series of monumental construction traditions from western Europe and the Middle East.

Intriguingly, it was built within 100 years or so of the creation of Stonehenge, the first Egyptian pyramids, the great cities of the Indus Valley and the first known Mesopotamian kingdoms.


https://www.independent.co.uk/news/scie ... 97666.html
Note: article presents also an unrelated video clip about new discoveries in Egypt.

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NotaPerson
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Re: Archaeology

#3

Post by NotaPerson » Mon Jul 22, 2019 11:11 am

Glad to see this thread, as stories like that fascinate me.

I've been reading up on the Etruscans lately. They inhabited central Italy before the Romans conquered them. I'm planning to visit some Etruscan sites next spring - mostly tombs, but also the "Etruscan Pyramid" I just learned about a few months ago...

https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/etr ... id-bomarzo
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RTH10260
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Re: Archaeology

#4

Post by RTH10260 » Thu Jul 25, 2019 10:03 am

500-Year-Old Shipwreck Discovered in Baltic Sea Looks ‘Like it Sank Yesterday’
July 23, 2019 by Mike Schuler

An international team of scientists have announced the discovery of the remains of a 500-year-old ship that remains pristinely intact in the cold, dark depths of the Baltic Sea.

Scientists say the shipwreck is perhaps the best preserved shipwreck of its period yet to be discovered.

It was first detected in 2009 by the Swedish Maritime Administration using state-of-the-art sonar. For years it went unexplored until earlier this year when, as part of work carried out by survey specialists MMT, the wreck was identified as having great archaeological and historical significance.

Further inspection of the wreck was led by Dr. Rodrigo Pacheco-Ruiz, MMT’s maritime archaeologist and deep sea archaeological expert together with the Centre for Maritime Archaeology (CMA) at the University of Southampton, Deep Sea Productions and the Maritime Archaeology Research Institute of Södertörn University (MARIS).

“This ship is contemporary to the times of Christopher Columbus and Leonardo Da Vinci, yet it demonstrates a remarkable level of preservation after five hundred years at the bottom of the sea, thanks to the cold, brackish waters of the Baltic,” said Dr Pacheco-Ruiz, who is also a Visiting Fellow in Maritime Archaeology at Southampton.

“It’s almost like it sank yesterday – masts in place and hull intact. Still on the main deck is an incredibly rare find – the tender boat, used to ferry crew to and from the ship, leaning against the main mast. It’s a truly astonishing sight,” he added.


https://gcaptain.com/500-year-old-shipw ... yesterday/

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Hurtzi
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Re: Archaeology

#5

Post by Hurtzi » Thu Jul 25, 2019 1:03 pm

RTH10260 wrote:
Mon Jul 22, 2019 9:59 am
Giant marble pyramid-shaped island complex rising from sea uncovered, revealing secrets of ancient Greece’s origins
Exclusive: Thousands of years of history being unlocked in the Aegean isles which could provide groundbreaking knowledge of ancient civilisations

David Keys Archaeology Correspondent
Tuesday 9 July 2019 17:45

Excavations on a tiny island in the Aegean Sea – 125 miles southeast of Athens – are revealing the earliest truly monumental complex of buildings ever unearthed anywhere in the Greek world.

Dating back 4,600 years, the site may also have been part of the inspiration for a key aspect of Greek religion – the idea that mountain tops were the dwelling places of the gods.

The complex – on a mountain peak-shaped islet off the coast of the Aegean island of Keros (part of the Cyclades archipelago) – is totally changing archaeologists’ understanding of prehistoric Greece.

Until now, nobody had realised the true scale of the complex – and the gargantuan effort that had gone into constructing it.

Archaeologists now believe that, in order to construct the complex, early Bronze Age Greeks embarked on at least 3,500 maritime voyages to transport between 7,000 and 10,000 tonnes of shining white marble from one Aegean island to another.

Each return voyage would have required up to 24 crew members to paddle for around five hours.

“It is by far the largest prehistoric marine transport operation that has ever come to light anywhere in the world,” said Dr Julian Whitewright, a leading maritime archaeologist at the University of Southampton.

“It demonstrates quite clearly just how important, and integral to their culture, seafaring was to these early Bronze Age Aegean people.”

The voyages – totalling around 45,000 miles – allowed the architects to construct what is thought to have been a huge religious sanctuary consisting of up to 60 marble buildings, which were constructed specifically to glisten in the sun.

What’s more, the architects “terra-formed” the pyramid-shaped island “mini-mountain”, known in recent centuries as Dhaskalio (possibly just meaning “islet”), to create around 1,000m of artificial terracing, arranged in six “steps” on its steep slopes.

These roughly six-metre wide terraces appear to have been built specifically to accommodate all the buildings. The summit itself was not initially built on – but instead had a small, probably sacred, open area where votive offerings may have been deposited.

“Our investigation has been transforming our understanding of early Bronze Age Cycladic culture and suggests that these very early Greeks were organisationally, technically and politically much more advanced than previously thought,” said the project’s co-director Michael Boyd, of Cambridge University’s McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research.

Nothing like this monumental complex has ever been found from this period in or around Greece before.

Although the current archaeological investigations on Dhaskalio have been going on for the past four years, it’s only more detailed examination of the resultant data over the past 12 months that has revealed the true scale of the complex, and the transport logistics and construction work associated with it.

But the remarkable nature of the site does fit into a much more widely dispersed series of monumental construction traditions from western Europe and the Middle East.

Intriguingly, it was built within 100 years or so of the creation of Stonehenge, the first Egyptian pyramids, the great cities of the Indus Valley and the first known Mesopotamian kingdoms.


https://www.independent.co.uk/news/scie ... 97666.html
Note: article presents also an unrelated video clip about new discoveries in Egypt.
This

https://maps.app.goo.gl/Cdfsd1oJYixRLiZk7

is Dhaskalio.
The "water bear" is the first creature to live on the moon.

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NotaPerson
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Re: Archaeology

#6

Post by NotaPerson » Mon Aug 12, 2019 9:31 pm

Pompeii archaeologists uncover 'sorcerer's treasure trove'
Archaeologists working in the buried Roman city of Pompeii say they have uncovered a "sorcerer's treasure trove" of artefacts, including good-luck charms, mirrors and glass beads.

Most of the items would have belonged to women, said Massimo Osanna, director of the Archaeological Park of Pompeii.

A room with the bodies of 10 victims, including women and children, was excavated in the same house.

Pompeii was engulfed by a volcanic eruption from Mt Vesuvius in AD 79.
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-49325627

Much more, including pics, at the link.
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Sluffy1
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Re: Archaeology

#7

Post by Sluffy1 » Thu Sep 12, 2019 10:28 am

The face of our oldest direct ancestor has been revealed for the first time, with scientists calling the 3.8-million-year-old ape-like hominin an “icon of human evolution”.

The adult male – known as MRD – was from a species known as Australopithecus anamensis who roamed Ethiopia’s highlands millions of years ago. He is an ancestor of “Lucy”, one of the world’s most famous fossils who lived in the same area 3.2 million years ago.

The two early human species co-existed for 100,000 years, which rewrites previous research suggesting the older species gave way to the younger one. The earlier group – which MRD comes from – is the oldest known species that is unambiguously part of the human evolutionary tree.
The 3.8m-year-old face of our oldest ancestor
Image
The 3.8-million-year-old cranium was almost completely preserved meaning scientists could identify never-before-seen facial features (reconstruction, pictured)
Image
Scientists already knew that Australopithecus anamensis (pictured, reconstruction) existed as bones of around 20 individuals have been discovered in Kenya and Ethiopia
https://www.independent.co.uk/news/scie ... 82106.html

PaulG
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Re: Archaeology

#8

Post by PaulG » Thu Sep 12, 2019 4:24 pm

I wonder about the eyes. They've given him small irises with lots of white visible. Primates seem to have larger irises.

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