A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

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tek
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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#51

Post by tek » Thu May 23, 2019 6:23 pm

not at all surprising.

The original significance of TLDs is long since gone.
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RTH10260
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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#52

Post by RTH10260 » Tue Jun 04, 2019 11:46 am

blog
Google’s Gmail scans, parses, analyzes and catalogs your email
June 3, 2019 by Mark E. Jeftovic

Recently I came across this story by Todd Haselton that describes how the author located an obscure “purchases” page in his Google account settings and there found a methodical list of his online purchasing history, from third-party outside vendors, going back to 2o12.

The upshot of the story was that:
Google saves years of information on purchases you’ve made, even outside Google, and pulls this information from Gmail.
It’s complicated to delete this private information, and options to turn it off are hidden in privacy settings.
Google says it doesn’t use this information to sell you ads.
Naturally, I flagged this story for the next edition of our #AxisOfEasy newsletter. Haselton reports that it isn’t easy to locate and delete this information, nor is there a straight-forward path to find it in your privacy settings to disable this behaviour.
This can’t be true (can it?)

The more I thought about this the more I thought “this can’t be true”. I apologize for doubting Haselton, but I thought he had to have it wrong, that maybe he had a stored credit card in his browser that he had forgotten or something, because the ramifications if true, are dire.

First, it means that in order to isolate and parse purchases, Google must then be scanning every email, otherwise, how would they know what’s a purchase and what isn’t?

Further, if they were scanning every email for purchases, what else where they scanning for? Either now, or in the future? The important mechanism, the infrastructure and methodology to scan and parse every inbound email is clearly in place and operational now, adding additional criterion is just a matter of tweaking the parameters.


https://easydns.com/blog/2019/06/03/goo ... our-email/

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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#53

Post by RTH10260 » Tue Jun 18, 2019 8:58 pm

European privacy standards at test
Spanish football league fined for turning fans' phones into pub spies
By James Badcock
June 13, 2019 — 3.53pm

Madrid: Spain's football league has been fined €250,000 ($400,000) for secretly using fans' mobile phones as spying tools to crack down on bars screening matches via pirated television signals.

Using an app installed on the users' phones, La Liga remotely turned on the microphone function of the phones to listen for the sound of a broadcast match.

The geolocation function was then able to establish the whereabouts of the person watching a game to check if they were in an establishment with a paid subscription to an official La Liga package, or if it was an illicit signal.

Spain's data protection agency issued the fine after finding that up to 50,000 La Liga users' phones had been used for the purpose.

The agency ruled that La Liga had committed a "very serious data protection infringement" by failing to inform users that their apps could activate the microphone.

If the scheme to crack down on venues screening games had been carried out legally, La Liga would have needed to tell users every time their microphones were switched on, which would have meant an in-app notification being sent to people once every minute while they watched the match.

The in-app spying function appeared to have paid dividends for La Liga, as it was able to file 600 criminal cases against Spanish bars and restaurants.

La Liga has said it loses €400 million a year in television royalties, and that half of Spain's 120,000 establishments showing La Liga do not buy the hospitality package.

La Liga calculates that, of these 60,000 bars and restaurants, two-thirds use a pirate signal while the remainder simply use the signal from a domestic television package, which costs a fraction of the price.


https://www.smh.com.au/sport/soccer/spa ... 51xgc.html

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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#54

Post by Slim Cognito » Mon Jul 08, 2019 4:04 pm

We have Century Link for our phone service and DSL internet. We don't have cable. We're perfectly happy streaming our tv via Netflix,Hulu and Prime using Roku. CL was never the greatest provider but we're cheap and everything worked fine, until...

The past few months our streaming is buffer, buffer, buffer. Sometimes we get a message we have insufficient bandwidth. If we wait it out, it comes back up and everything continues. Sometimes it takes 1 hr 15 min to watch a 60 minute show. I've called Century Link and they insist nothing has changed but! For $100 installation and another $30 a month, they'll up us from 10 whatever the unit of measure is to 30 whatever the unit of measure is. But they insist this has nothing to do with net neutrality biting the big one. I'm cynical. Everything worked great for years and we were one of the first to cut the cable for streaming subscriptions.

Thoughts?
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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#55

Post by DejaMoo » Mon Jul 08, 2019 4:23 pm

Slim Cognito wrote:
Mon Jul 08, 2019 4:04 pm
We have Century Link for our phone service and DSL internet. We don't have cable. We're perfectly happy streaming our tv via Netflix,Hulu and Prime using Roku. CL was never the greatest provider but we're cheap and everything worked fine, until...

The past few months our streaming is buffer, buffer, buffer. Sometimes we get a message we have insufficient bandwidth. If we wait it out, it comes back up and everything continues. Sometimes it takes 1 hr 15 min to watch a 60 minute show. I've called Century Link and they insist nothing has changed but! For $100 installation and another $30 a month, they'll up us from 10 whatever the unit of measure is to 30 whatever the unit of measure is. But they insist this has nothing to do with net neutrality biting the big one. I'm cynical. Everything worked great for years and we were one of the first to cut the cable for streaming subscriptions.

Thoughts?
CenturyLink Considering Dumping Its Consumer Landline/Broadband Services
CenturyLink is considering getting out of the consumer landline and broadband business and instead focusing on its profitable corporate-targeted enterprise and wholesale businesses.

CenturyLink CEO Jeff Storey told investors on a quarterly conference call that the phone company had hired advisors that will conduct a strategic review of all CenturyLink products and services targeting the consumer market and is “very open” to the possibility to selling or spinning off its residential business, assuming it can find an interested buyer.

Like most large independent telephone companies, the majority of CenturyLink’s residential customers can only purchase slow speed DSL service offering less than 20 Mbps. A growing number of customers have canceled service after running out of patience waiting for upgrades. CenturyLink executives told investors last week the company is abandoning investments in bonded or vectored DSL upgrades, claiming anything other than fiber optics is not “competitive infrastructure.”

CenturyLink also admitted it is losing customers after deciding to shelve its unprofitable, competing Prism TV product. The only growth on the consumer side of CenturyLink is coming from significant broadband upgrades.
I've heard this bull before.

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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#56

Post by MN-Skeptic » Mon Jul 08, 2019 4:28 pm

I also have CenturyLink and DSL. Do you have something like the app Speedcheck which will tell you how fast you internet downloads are? Occasionally my internet slows to less than 5. When that happens, I’ll unplug my modem, wait 10 seconds, then plug it back in. Invariably it goes back up to 15 or whatever.
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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#57

Post by Foggy » Mon Jul 08, 2019 4:29 pm

https://speakeasy.net/speedtest is the one I use to check internet speeds.
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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#58

Post by Judge Roy Bean » Mon Jul 08, 2019 11:18 pm

There is some physical/geography impact, especially on DSL networks that involve your neighborhood/area and the activity of the other users who share the network.

At your end of the food chain, simple timing could be everything. Depending on who else is doing whatever they do, your service may be impacted just as you may impact the service being provided to others. The hose the water/data comes to you through can only handle so much flow. If their hoses aren't big enough, everyone gets a dribble rather than a full flow.

But the other thing to consider is the viability of the sources you're receiving from. Most major paid-for content providers have robust, built-in redundancy using multiple delivery networks to assure the user experience is consistent. The further down the economic food chain you go into content sources, the more likely it is you're going to see annoying temporary delays. They can't pay for redundant paths and services.

Technologically, they know this - they have network management tools available from their service providers to see the performance rates. It's a matter of what they're going to make their audience tolerate for the price.
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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#59

Post by RTH10260 » Wed Jul 10, 2019 10:46 am

A Cloudflare Outage Takes Down the Internet for the Second Time in a Week. Here's How the CEO Responded
Cloudflare's CEO says the outage today wasn't the result of an attack, but rather a process that spun out of control. His response is a lesson in what to do when everything goes wrong.
By Jason Aten

If you're online and notice that your favorite website or app isn't working, there's a good chance you might head over to a site like Downdetector to see if outages are being reported. Of course, this morning, if you tried that, you found that site to be, well, down.

That's because, for the second time in just over a week, Cloudflare suffered a major outage that resulted in thousands of sites going offline for a short time. Other sites and services that were affected include Shopify, customer help desk service Zendesk, chat service Discord, Cloudbase, Dropbox, and Nest.

That's a pretty big deal if you happen to use any of those services to run your business; never mind that thousands of websites rely on Cloudflare to provide network services.

The company posted the following on its blog:


https://www.inc.com/jason-aten/cloudfla ... onded.html

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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#60

Post by RTH10260 » Sat Jul 20, 2019 9:40 pm

crossposting
HOW U.S. TECH GIANTS ARE HELPING TO BUILD CHINA’S SURVEILLANCE STATE
Ryan Gallagher
July 11 2019, 2:01 p.m.

AN AMERICAN ORGANIZATION founded by tech giants Google and IBM is working with a company that is helping China’s authoritarian government conduct mass surveillance against its citizens, The Intercept can reveal.

The OpenPower Foundation — a nonprofit led by Google and IBM executives with the aim of trying to “drive innovation” — has set up a collaboration between IBM, Chinese company Semptian, and U.S. chip manufacturer Xilinx. Together, they have worked to advance a breed of microprocessors that enable computers to analyze vast amounts of data more efficiently.

Shenzhen-based Semptian is using the devices to enhance the capabilities of internet surveillance and censorship technology it provides to human rights-abusing security agencies in China, according to sources and documents. A company employee said that its technology is being used to covertly monitor the internet activity of 200 million people.

Semptian, Google, and Xilinx did not respond to requests for comment. The OpenPower Foundation said in a statement that it “does not become involved, or seek to be informed, about the individual business strategies, goals or activities of its members,” due to antitrust and competition laws. An IBM spokesperson said that his company “has not worked with Semptian on joint technology development,” but declined to answer further questions. A source familiar with Semptian’s operations said that Semptian had worked with IBM through a collaborative cloud platform called SuperVessel, which is maintained by an IBM research unit in China.


https://theintercept.com/2019/07/11/chi ... -semptian/

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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#61

Post by RTH10260 » Mon Jul 22, 2019 5:50 pm

I found your data. It’s for sale.

As many as 4 million people have Web browser extensions that sell their every click. And that’s just the tip of the iceberg.
You installed a browser extension. It's selling everything you do.
Companies using Chrome and Firefox extensions to collect your browser data are putting your privacy at risk.


By Geoffrey A. Fowler Technology columnist
July 18

I’ve watched you check in for a flight and seen your doctor refilling a prescription.

I’ve peeked inside corporate networks at reports on faulty rockets. If I wanted, I could’ve even opened a tax return you only shared with your accountant.

I found your data because it’s for sale online. Even more terrifying: It’s happening because of software you probably installed yourself.

My latest investigation into the secret life of our data is not a fire drill. Working with an independent security researcher, I found as many as 4 million people have been leaking personal and corporate secrets through Chrome and Firefox. Even a colleague in The Washington Post’s newsroom got caught up. When we told browser makers Google and Mozilla, they shut these leaks immediately — but we probably identified only a fraction of the problem.

Extensions, little programs also known as add-ons and plug-ins, hang out in the top right corner of your browser.

The root of this privacy train wreck is browser extensions. Also known as add-ons and plug-ins, they’re little programs used by nearly half of all desktop Web surfers to make browsing better, such as finding coupons or remembering passwords. People install them assuming that any software offered in a store run by Chrome or Firefox has got to be legit.


https://www.washingtonpost.com/technolo ... -its-sale/

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tek
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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#62

Post by tek » Mon Jul 22, 2019 6:44 pm

TANSTAAFL

Seriously. Nobody rides for free.
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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#63

Post by RTH10260 » Fri Aug 16, 2019 6:18 am

DNS over HTTPS: things to consider when you go “private”
What it means for privacy, security, and parental controls, and whether there’s a way to have them all.

The term “DNS over HTTPS (DoH)” has been hitting the headlines in the past month: Google announced its general availability in June, and in July, Mozilla was nominated for “2019 Internet Villains” by the UK Internet Services Providers’ Association (ISPA) for introducing DoH to Firefox (the nomination was later withdrawn due to a global outcry).

This epitomizes how a new technology is disrupting existing implementations – but not just to ISPs and government agencies. Let’s take a look at what benefits DoH brings (especially in light of the recent surge in global DNS hijacking activities), its implications on many things we’ve relied on or even paid for, and what may be the easiest, least disruptive way to have this “privacy-first” technology on your devices.

DNS over HTTPS: the future of web privacy

Most popular websites nowadays use HTTPS to encrypt connections and protect sensitive information such as passwords, credit card details, and Internet bank logins. However, DNS queries are still sent in plaintext.


https://originblog.synology.com/dns-over-https/

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Re: A General Thread -- for all other tech stuff

#64

Post by RTH10260 » Thu Sep 05, 2019 11:18 am

Google, Industry Try to Water Down First U.S. Data-Privacy Law
Google and its industry allies are making a late bid to water down the first major data-privacy law in the U.S., seeking to carve out exemptions for digital advertising, according to documents obtained by Bloomberg and people familiar with the negotiations.
Bloomberg News | Sep 04, 2019

(Bloomberg) -- Google and its industry allies are making a late bid to water down the first major data-privacy law in the U.S., seeking to carve out exemptions for digital advertising, according to documents obtained by Bloomberg and people familiar with the negotiations.

A lobbyist for Google recently distributed new language to members of California’s state legislature that would amend the California Consumer Privacy Act. As currently drafted, the law limits how Google and other companies collect and make money from user data online, threatening a business model that generates billions of dollars in ad revenue. It’s due to kick in next year and there are only a few more days to amend the law.

The lobbying push seeks legislative approval to continue collecting user data for targeted advertising, and in some cases, the right to do so even if users opt out, according to the documents and the people familiar with the negotiations. They asked not to be identified discussing private activities and to keep the lobbyist’s name confidential.


https://www.itprotoday.com/compliance/g ... rivacy-law

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