Gardening 2018

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Bill_G
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Re: Gardening 2018

#151

Post by Bill_G » Thu Jul 12, 2018 11:09 pm

P.K. wrote:
Thu Jul 12, 2018 9:10 am
Beautiful!

We had 117+ degree temps last Thursday (my car dash thermometer read 121 after sitting in the park n ride in the Valley all afternoon) and four out of five of my tomato plants were killed by the heat. The tomatoes that were on the vine seemed partially cooked and not in a yummy way. I cut all the dead branches off the survivor and discarded all the fruit, and when temps are cooler I'll get some seedlings and start over.

Of course the heat didn't even touch the weeds that were invading my tiny tomato patch. They're all fine. :roll:
Oh yeah. At 117, they suffered. Tomatoes don't like heat above 100F for long. The leaves scald, and blossom drop is common. Sometimes you can recover them by providing shade, but that means you have to anticipate the need, and have something on hand already. That's why tomatoe season is in the winter in Florida - it's warm enough to grow them, and cool enough to not kill them.



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P.K.
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Re: Gardening 2018

#152

Post by P.K. » Sun Jul 15, 2018 9:59 pm

Good news! The one surviving tomato plant is bouncing back, and has even set fruit! I forget what variety it was, but it's a really tasty brown tomato with pink stripes. I'm glad I'll be getting a few more of those. As long as the temps stay below 117 that is. :dance:


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Bill_G
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Re: Gardening 2018

#153

Post by Bill_G » Sun Jul 15, 2018 11:21 pm

P.K. wrote:
Sun Jul 15, 2018 9:59 pm
Good news! The one surviving tomato plant is bouncing back, and has even set fruit! I forget what variety it was, but it's a really tasty brown tomato with pink stripes. I'm glad I'll be getting a few more of those. As long as the temps stay below 117 that is. :dance:
Toma, the tomatoe Goddess is on your side! Now you have to keep Sol at bay. He is a jealous God.



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Re: Gardening 2018

#154

Post by kate520 » Sun Jul 15, 2018 11:34 pm

My tomatoes this year were volunteer black cherry ones that started producing in February and just finished befor the heat. But...my ancient Rex begonia from Mexico may not survive. :crying: Of course, we’re going on vacation for two weeks. I’ll have to figure out a way to save it.

https://www.begonias.org/monthly/heracleifolia.pdf

Mine has very red hairy stems. It comes from Veracruz, where the previous owners of our home used to vacation.


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Bill_G
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Re: Gardening 2018

#155

Post by Bill_G » Sun Jul 15, 2018 11:58 pm

Well, it's official now. The Willamette Valley has entered that part of the year where we rename the state Orezona, We haven't broken 100F yet, but you can feel it wants to.

The potatoe leaves are scalded, and many of the tops will probably die off in the next week meaning I'll be digging those up soon. The spinach is bolting, and the lettuce isn't far behind.

The beets have leaf miners, but they usually can suffer through those. It just means I don't get any greens off them for a while until it's too cold for the bugs.

The tomatoes and beans are greeting the heat and rising to Sol. The beef steak hit five feet tall today, and the early girl is a close second. They both got a good dose of compost tea to help transition from growth to fruiting.

You can almost see the pole bean runners grow. A couple blossoms forming, but nothing major. OTOH, the bush beans have hundreds of little eyelash size beans set. So, we'll be having assorted bean green dinners soon - green beans and spatzle being my personal favorite. Considering the potatoe situation, I imagine it will be simple beans and taters first.

The garlic is almost dry enough to clean now. It's on my roundtoit list to get done soon.

We have scads of pickle size cucumbers. We should be eating those in another week. Mrs_G's favorite is to chunk those up with mayo, garlic, red onion, and lemon juice on a bed of mild dirty rice (ground beef, rice, and a pinch of chili peppers with other spices) (or she may cheat and use Rice-a-roni - still good).

The compost pile hit 130F today, and the babies have returned. Babies meaning black soldier flies - the gift to any gardener. They reduce the volume of the compost pile by fifty percent in short order yielding (A) bug poop which is good for the garden, and (B) predator insects (wasps, yellow jackets, hornets) going after the slow and lumbering black soldier fly adults as the larvae pupate. The predators in turn forage the rest of the garden for other insects keeping it cleared of hornworms on the tomatoes, etc. A total blessing to have BSF in the compost pile. Just don't go into the garden midday when the predators are in high feeding mode. Early morning, and evenings are good.



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Bill_G
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Re: Gardening 2018

#156

Post by Bill_G » Mon Jul 16, 2018 12:02 am

kate520 wrote:
Sun Jul 15, 2018 11:34 pm
My tomatoes this year were volunteer black cherry ones that started producing in February and just finished befor the heat. But...my ancient Rex begonia from Mexico may not survive. :crying: Of course, we’re going on vacation for two weeks. I’ll have to figure out a way to save it.

https://www.begonias.org/monthly/heracleifolia.pdf

Mine has very red hairy stems. It comes from Veracruz, where the previous owners of our home used to vacation.
Water it well, perhaps put up some shade with a board staked to the ground, and let nature take it's course. The top may die back, but the root will probably survive, and regrow when it cools down again.



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Bill_G
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Re: Gardening 2018

#157

Post by Bill_G » Sat Jul 21, 2018 10:44 am

We had our first green beans last night from a fast growing Ed Hume bush fillet variety. When it says 51 days to maturity, they were right on the money. I'm going to plant more so we have some by mid-September.

We also started picking cucumbers this week. I love them when they are fresh. They have a distinct fruity aroma, and a sweetness that disappears within hours. Entirely different from store bought until they sit in a fridge overnight, and then you can't tell the difference.



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