Astronomy and Space

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RTH10260
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Re: Astronomy and Space

#276

Post by RTH10260 »


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Notorial Dissent
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Re: Astronomy and Space

#277

Post by Notorial Dissent »

Incredible pictures.
The fact that you sincerely and wholeheartedly believe that the “Law of Gravity” is unconstitutional and a violation of your sovereign rights, does not absolve you of adherence to it.

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RTH10260
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Re: Astronomy and Space

#278

Post by RTH10260 »

Voyager 2 Fully Brought Back Online by NASA Some 11.5 Billion Miles from Earth

Thanks to some remote engineering work by NASA, the intrepid explorer’s science mission is back on. Voyager 2, currently some 11.5 billion miles from Earth, is back online and resuming its mission to collect scientific data on the solar system and the interstellar space beyond.

Keeping a 42-year-old space probe working is not a simple feat. Engineers have been working to restore normal operations on Voyager 2 after automated fault protection routines shut off the probe’s science instruments.

Mission operators report that Voyager 2 continues to be stable and that communications between Earth and the spacecraft are good. The spacecraft has resumed taking science data, and the science teams are now evaluating the health of the instruments following their brief shutoff.


https://www.sciencepagenews.com/2020/02 ... rom-earth/

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Foggy
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Re: Astronomy and Space

#279

Post by Foggy »

I saw Star Trek, the Motion Picture. This is a BAD IDEA. :fingerwag:
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In the back of your car! In the back of your car! ♫ ♪


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Estiveo
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Re: Astronomy and Space

#280

Post by Estiveo »

Foggy wrote:
Sat Feb 22, 2020 4:00 pm
I saw Star Trek, the Motion Picture. This is a BAD IDEA. :fingerwag:
Nope nope nope, that was Voyager 6, which never existed in this iteration of the multiverse.
:nope:
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qbawl
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Re: Astronomy and Space

#281

Post by qbawl »

Estiveo wrote:
Sat Feb 22, 2020 5:33 pm
Foggy wrote:
Sat Feb 22, 2020 4:00 pm
I saw Star Trek, the Motion Picture. This is a BAD IDEA. :fingerwag:
Nope nope nope, that was Voyager 6, which never existed in this iteration of the multiverse.
:nope:
But in the original Star-Trek didn't "Veeger" wreak some sort of havoc or am I thinking of something else?

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Foggy
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Re: Astronomy and Space

#282

Post by Foggy »

qbawl wrote:
Sat Feb 22, 2020 5:44 pm
But in the original Star-Trek didn't "Veeger" wreak some sort of havoc or am I thinking of something else?
Yeah, but he's right, in the movie it was Voyager 6 that turned into "Veeger". And there never yet has been a Voyager 6.

Still, it's not wise to send an intelligent spaceship godonlyknowswhere. That thing could tell somebody where we live!
♪ ♫ But I don't want a lover, I just want to be tied up ...
In the back of your car! In the back of your car! ♫ ♪


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Estiveo
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Re: Astronomy and Space

#283

Post by Estiveo »

Mm-hm, designed to rat us out, Ackshully.
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AndyinPA
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Re: Astronomy and Space

#284

Post by AndyinPA »

Foggy wrote:
Sat Feb 22, 2020 6:21 pm
qbawl wrote:
Sat Feb 22, 2020 5:44 pm
But in the original Star-Trek didn't "Veeger" wreak some sort of havoc or am I thinking of something else?
Yeah, but he's right, in the movie it was Voyager 6 that turned into "Veeger". And there never yet has been a Voyager 6.

Still, it's not wise to send an intelligent spaceship godonlyknowswhere. That thing could tell somebody where we live!
Yeah, but we'll be an extinct species by then.
"To argue with a person who has renounced the use of reason is like administering medicine to the dead." -- Thomas Paine

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neonzx
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Re: Astronomy and Space

#285

Post by neonzx »

AndyinPA wrote:
Sat Feb 22, 2020 7:57 pm
Foggy wrote:
Sat Feb 22, 2020 6:21 pm
qbawl wrote:
Sat Feb 22, 2020 5:44 pm
But in the original Star-Trek didn't "Veeger" wreak some sort of havoc or am I thinking of something else?
Yeah, but he's right, in the movie it was Voyager 6 that turned into "Veeger". And there never yet has been a Voyager 6.

Still, it's not wise to send an intelligent spaceship godonlyknowswhere. That thing could tell somebody where we live!
Yeah, but we'll be an extinct species by then.
At the rate we're going, probably right on that.

But, before I go, we I use the Tardis and/or Holodeck to visit a time where DJT lost in 2016?
To which Trump replied, Fuck the law. I don't give a fuck about the law. I want my fucking money.

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RTH10260
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Re: Astronomy and Space

#286

Post by RTH10260 »

China’s Moon Rover Takes a Deeper Look at the Far Side
Radar data from the Chang’e-4 mission show multiple debris layers under the rover, recording eons of lunar history

By Jonathan O'Callaghan on February 26, 2020

A view of the Chang’e-4 lander (center) and rover (a small black dot to the northwest) within Von Kármán crater on the far side of the moon, as seen by NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter on July 1, 2019. Credit: James Stuby based on NASA image, Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera Observation
The moon hasn’t had it easy over the years. Since the dawn of the solar system 4.5 billion years ago, its gray and lifeless surface has been repeatedly pummeled by incoming space rocks, leaving behind a pockmarked landscape strewn with rubble. Beneath this surface, however, hide the moon’s most tantalizing secrets for human explorers, from possible reservoirs of ice for producing potable water and rocket fuel to hollow lava tubes that are suitable for harboring habitats. More fundamentally, mapping the moon’s subsurface can reveal otherwise-hidden epochs of solar system history written by impacts, buried craters and associated debris—as demonstrated by fresh results from a Chinese rover on the little-explored lunar far side.

In a paper published in the journal Science Advances today, a collaboration of Chinese and European researchers describes the latest results from the Chang’e-4 mission, run by the China National Space Administration. Launched in December 2018 and reaching the moon in early January 2019, the mission became the first to land on the far side of the natural satellite, targeting an intriguing region near the lunar south pole called the South Pole–Aitken Basin. Formed 3.9 billion years ago and stretching some 2,500 kilometers across, it is the biggest impact basin in the solar system—and perhaps a key to understanding how great impacts have shaped Earth and other inner planets. The Chang’e-4 rover is still operational today and has been slowly trundling across this region, traveling a few hundred meters since it landed.

remainder is paywall https://www.scientificamerican.com/arti ... -far-side/

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RTH10260
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Re: Astronomy and Space

#287

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NASA’s InSight Lander Reveals New Details of Martian Quakes and Magnetism
The spacecraft has recorded about 450 “Marsquakes” to date

By Mike Wall, SPACE.com on February 24, 2020

Mars may be cold and dry, but it’s far from dead.

The first official science results from NASA’s quake-hunting InSight Mars lander just came out, and they reveal a regularly roiled world.

“We’ve finally, for the first time, established that Mars is a seismically active planet,” InSight principal investigator Bruce Banerdt, of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California, said during a teleconference with reporters Thursday (Feb. 20).

Martian seismicity falls between that of the moon and that of Earth, Banerdt added.

“In fact, it’s probably close to the kind of seismic activity you would expect to find away from the [tectonic] plate boundaries on Earth and away from highly deformed areas,” he said.

Paywalled https://www.scientificamerican.com/arti ... magnetism/

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Re: Astronomy and Space

#288

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer »

https://phys.org/news/2020-03-scientist ... -dark.html
Scientists shed light on mystery of dark matter

Up to 80% of the Universe could be dark matter, but despite many decades of study, its physical origin has remained an enigma. While it cannot be seen directly, scientists know it exists because of its interaction via gravity with visible matter like stars and planets. Dark matter is composed of particles that do not absorb, reflect or emit light.

Now, nuclear physicists at the University of York are putting forward a new candidate for the mysterious matter—a particle they recently discovered called the d-star hexaquark. (A name George Lucas could love.)

The particle is composed of six quarks—the fundamental particles that usually combine in trios to make up protons and neutrons. Importantly, the six quarks in a d-star result in a boson particle, which means that when many d-stars are present they can combine together in very different ways to the protons and neutrons.

The research group at York suggest that in the conditions shortly after the Big Bang, many d-star hexaquarks could have grouped together as the universe cooled and expanded to form the fifth state of matter—Bose-Einstein condensate.

A 19th Amendment Centennial Moment:
The 19th Amendment was first introduced to Congress in 1878, yet it was not approved by Congress until 1919 – 41 years later.
- https://legaldictionary.net/19th-amendment/

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RTH10260
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Re: Astronomy and Space

#289

Post by RTH10260 »

no, they didn't locate the man in the moon
China’s Rover Finds Layers of Surprise Under Moon’s Far Side
The Chang’e-4 mission, the first to land on the lunar far side, is demonstrating the promise and peril of using ground-penetrating radar in planetary science.

By Kenneth Chang
Feb. 26, 2020

China’s robotic Chang’e-4 spacecraft did something last year that had never been done before: It landed on the moon’s far side, and Yutu-2, a small rover it was carrying, began trundling through a crater there. One of the rover’s instruments, a ground-penetrating radar, is now revealing what lies beneath.

In a paper published Wednesday in the journal Science Advances, a team of Chinese and Italian researchers showed that the top layer of the lunar soil on that part of the moon is considerably thicker than some expected — about 130 feet of what scientists call regolith.


https://www.nytimes.com/2020/02/26/scie ... -side.html

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Suranis
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Re: Astronomy and Space

#290

Post by Suranis »

Foggy wrote:
Sat Feb 22, 2020 6:21 pm
Still, it's not wise to send an intelligent spaceship godonlyknowswhere. That thing could tell somebody where we live!
It's ok. It will be blown up by Klingons in Star Trek 5
The difference between the Middle Ages, and the Age of the Internet, is that in the Middle Ages no-one thought the Earth was flat.

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Re: Astronomy and Space

#291

Post by RVInit »

https://www.space.com/minor-planets-bey ... gn=dlvr.it
'Minor planet' bonanza: 139 new objects discovered beyond Neptune

The list of Pluto's neighbors just got considerably longer, potentially boosting scientists' odds of finding the putative Planet Nine.

Astronomers have discovered 139 more "minor planets" — small bodies circling the sun that are neither official planets nor comets — in the dark, frigid depths beyond Neptune's orbit, a new study reports. The new additions represent nearly 5% of the current trans-Neptunian object (TNO) tally, which stands at about 3,000, the researchers said.

The scientists pored over data gathered by the Dark Energy Survey (DES) during its first four years of operation, from 2013 to 2017. The DES studies the heavens using the 520-megapixel Dark Energy Camera, which is mounted on the Blanco 4-meter telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile.

As the project's name implies, the main goal of the DES involves shedding light on dark energy, the mysterious force thought to be behind the universe's accelerating expansion. But the high-resolution DES imagery has a number of other applications, including the discovery of small objects in our own solar system, as the new study shows.

:snippity:
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