Recipes!

TexasFilly
Posts: 17964
Joined: Mon Sep 28, 2009 12:52 pm

Recipes!

#1

Post by TexasFilly » Fri May 13, 2011 1:49 am

I really miss the recipe thread that got left over at Politijab. I was talking to Estiveo about this the other night, and so I decided to start a new thread here. There were a ton of really interesting recipes in that other thread, but I guess we'll have to start over. :(( The most useful recipe for me was Kate's Thin Pork Cutlets with Apple Cider Vinegar. It's so simple, so quick, and people just love it! Even my hairdresser and his partner make it all the time. Delish!Anyway, any one cook up anything interesting lately?


I love the poorly educated!!!

I believe Anita Hill! I believe Dr. Ford!

User avatar
Estiveo
Posts: 7395
Joined: Tue Oct 20, 2009 7:31 pm
Location: Trouble's Howse

Recipes!

#2

Post by Estiveo » Fri May 13, 2011 3:05 am

Guess who did a bit of the old cut 'n' paste some time back and has a MS Word document of the whole recipe thread from PJ? If you guessed me, you would be correct. This includes Foggy's scatalogical litterbox cake and Boogers On A Stick recipes.





Meanwhile, since I agree with TF that Kate's recipe for pork cutlets, which I also, too, have prepared, is da bomb biggity:





Kate's Thin Pork Cutlets with Apple Cider Vinegar


*begin cut and paste...





This summer I've been getting pork cutlets from TJ's. They make a great light breakfast. I fix them for dinner when I'm pushed for time cuz they cook in, like, two minutes.





Olive oil


Chopped garlic


Thinly sliced onions (optional)


Cutlets


Salt/pepper


Apple cider vinegar


(editor Korir's fruit fly problem brought this to mind. Don't add fruit flies, though)





Saute garlic (and onions if using) in olive oil over medium heat. Add cutlets, cook 1-2 minutes per side. After turning over, splash apple cider vinegar over each cutlet. Salt and pepper to taste. The vinegar will boil up and make a nice little sauce.





I usually make brown rice and spinach with it because I love vinegar on spinach and use the sauce for that, too.





Kate520, 9/18/10


Image Image Image Image Image

User avatar
Estiveo
Posts: 7395
Joined: Tue Oct 20, 2009 7:31 pm
Location: Trouble's Howse

Recipes!

#3

Post by Estiveo » Fri May 13, 2011 3:11 am

If anyone wants the MS Word document with the whole (except for some discussion of rhubarb) PJ recipe thread, just PM me with an e-mail address and I'll shoot it yer way. And the thread IS still there on PJ.


Image Image Image Image Image

User avatar
MsDaisy
Posts: 4588
Joined: Mon Dec 07, 2009 12:30 pm

Recipes!

#4

Post by MsDaisy » Sun Jun 05, 2011 11:03 am

Anyone out there do canning? I do salsa, stewed tomatoes, plain tomatoes, orange marmalade, and such. (I’m about to do some strawberry jam. Canner’s boiling) :-bd I’m looking for a good hot sauce recipe. Habaneras, Jalapenos and Cyanine are growing nicely. Last year I dried them and ground them into a powder for sprinkling a bit of pop here and there. (But husband found it, didn’t know what it was and threw it out.) :evil: Any good ideas for other stuff? I just got my first “pressure canner”! (Or am I the only country girl on the forum?)


Birfers are toast

User avatar
ZekeB
Posts: 14780
Joined: Mon Oct 12, 2009 10:07 pm
Location: Northwest part of Semi Blue State

Recipes!

#5

Post by ZekeB » Sun Jun 05, 2011 11:14 am

Will you marry me, MsDaisy? But first get the canning down to a fine art. Doing it wrong can make a person sick and wish they were dead.


Ano, jsou opravdové. - Stormy Daniels

Nech mě domluvit! - Orly Taitz

User avatar
SueDB
Posts: 27756
Joined: Thu Sep 30, 2010 2:02 pm
Location: RIP, my friend. - Foggy

Recipes!

#6

Post by SueDB » Sun Jun 05, 2011 11:18 am

Anyone out there do canning? I do salsa, stewed tomatoes, plain tomatoes, orange marmalade, and such. (I’m about to do some strawberry jam. Canner’s boiling) :-bd I’m looking for a good hot sauce recipe. Habaneras, Jalapenos and Cyanine are growing nicely. Last year I dried them and ground them into a powder for sprinkling a bit of pop here and there. (But husband found it, didn’t know what it was and threw it out.) :evil: Any good ideas for other stuff? I just got my first “pressure canner”! (Or am I the only country girl on the forum?)Last year I grew my own cucumbers and made pickles. It was really kewl to be able to grow the cukes then can them as pickles...Dill/garlic - sweets and my favorite is the bread and butter slices...
Edit: Gonna try some low sugar/diet (so to speak) strawberry jelly when they get ripe around here.


“If You're Not In The Obit, Eat Breakfast”

Remember, Orly NEVAH disappoints!

User avatar
kate520
Posts: 15210
Joined: Mon Oct 26, 2009 3:02 pm
Location: Dark side of the Moon
Occupation: servant of cats, chicken wrangler
Contact:

Recipes!

#7

Post by kate520 » Sun Jun 05, 2011 11:32 am

Maybe you can help me perfect my jalapeño lime jelly recipe.It's fairly simple, as are most jams. I used the amount of sugar called for and it was wayyyy too much, so next time I will go for the reduced sugar pectin version.So, you need bell peppers for sweetness. I used red - WRONG. Green.You need vinegar - I used apple cider as I was all out of white - WRONG. added sweetness instead of sourI used the amount of jalapeno called for in the recipe - WRONG. needs more.But when it's just right...on sourdough toast with butter :xo as a glaze on pork :xo with lamb :xo But mostly on toast. Mmmm, I think I'll have some right now!This is the recipe I started with. I skipped the food coloring and, for my first batch, halved there recipe.[/break1]cooks.com/rec/view/0,1923,155168-224201,00.html]http://www.cooks.com/rec/view/0,1923,15 ... 01,00.html


DEFEND DEMOCRACY

User avatar
SueDB
Posts: 27756
Joined: Thu Sep 30, 2010 2:02 pm
Location: RIP, my friend. - Foggy

Recipes!

#8

Post by SueDB » Sun Jun 05, 2011 11:34 am

Grew a couple of plants of the "Fooled You" no hot jalapeno style pepper last year. For those who can't do hot but like the flavor, these work really nice.


“If You're Not In The Obit, Eat Breakfast”

Remember, Orly NEVAH disappoints!

ducktape
Posts: 5334
Joined: Tue Jan 12, 2010 5:09 pm

Recipes!

#9

Post by ducktape » Sun Jun 05, 2011 11:59 am

I do recipes and sampling at our Saturday organic farmer's market, and also take around a jug of iced refreshment (lemonade, fruit drink, whatever) for the vendors in the last hour of the market. In return, I am blessed with all the "eat me now" fruit and veggies I want. Did I say blessed? Sometimes, the word would be "inundated." Last summer, there were weeks in which I brought home 60 lbs or more of grapes, peaches, pears, apples ... and yes, cucumbers. Yesterday, I got a whole crate of apples, and a couple of pounds of cherries that were blemished but otherwise fine. I have canned so much jam, preserves, fruit butter and pickles that I am stocked for the next several years. So now, I mostly trim and freeze in ziplocks, or juice it and either take the extra juice back as the refreshment the next week, or freeze it in ice cube trays and put the cubes into ziplock bags for drinks, smoothies or recipes. I have a couple of dryers, and make wonderful plump, organic raisins from the grapes. By the way, melon, especially watermelon and honeydew, dry magnificently into a sweet treat with a jewel-like color. Slice them about 1/4-inch thick -- takes about 8 hours in my dryer (as opposed to grapes, that take almost 3 days!).Last summer, my mom gave me an ice cream freezer with its own compressor. The problem with most consumer freezers is that you have to freeze the chill container for at least 24 hours. If you have a failure, either of freezing (not cold enough?) or recipe, you're at least 24 hours before you can try again. I didn't have room in my freezer for the chill container to live, and I found that the 24-hour wait inhibited my creativity. This freezer lets me process several batches in a day, and I started turning the fruits into sorbets. OMG, wonderful, and it's made me very popular in the neighborhood, including with some neighbors that I did not get along with before. There's a book I found on Amazon called "The Perfect Scoop" and it has been my textbook -- and starting point for my own.My personal favorite so far -- strawberry sorbet made with about 3 Tbs of balsamic vinegar and a chiffonade of basil. But the purple and yellow plum sorbets are pretty fine, and the avocado ice cream was ... interesting. Actually, a scoop was perfect in a big bowl of gazpacho made with heirloom tomatoes, and that season will start in a few weeks.Oh, and cold cucumber soup ... I'll do the soup recipes here soon.



User avatar
MsDaisy
Posts: 4588
Joined: Mon Dec 07, 2009 12:30 pm

Recipes!

#10

Post by MsDaisy » Mon Jun 06, 2011 7:27 am

Maybe you can help me perfect my jalapeño lime jelly recipe.It's fairly simple, as are most jams. I used the amount of sugar called for and it was wayyyy too much, so next time I will go for the reduced sugar pectin version.So, you need bell peppers for sweetness. I used red - WRONG. Green.You need vinegar - I used apple cider as I was all out of white - WRONG. added sweetness instead of sourI used the amount of jalapeno called for in the recipe - WRONG. needs more.But when it's just right...on sourdough toast with butter :xo as a glaze on pork :xo with lamb :xo But mostly on toast. Mmmm, I think I'll have some right now!This is the recipe I started with. I skipped the food coloring and, for my first batch, halved there recipe.[/break1]cooks.com/rec/view/0,1923,155168-224201,00.html]http://www.cooks.com/rec/view/0,1923,15 ... 01,00.htmlI don’t like to use a lot of sugar either. With jam/marmalade I use raw sugar. It has a better flavor. I usually use a about half the amount called for and add pectin. Ripe fresh fruit is already sweet, why wreck it with 5 pounds of sugar?I always dinky recipes too, and sometimes it comes down to trial and error. Last year I tried a hot sauce recipe that turned out so mild I would have needed to put hot sauce in the hot sauce to make it hot. Waste of time. The recipe also called for cinnamon, which I thought was odd, but I tried half of what was called for on that as well, but I should have left it out all together. When using hot peppers they always say to remove the seeds and veins, and that’s where most of the heat is. I don’t know about you, but I like hot. One thing I’ve noticed about hot peppers is that the longer you cook them the more heat they lose, so leaving in a few seeds might help. Or you could throw in a hotter pepper. Jalapenos are pretty light on the heat index. [/break1]armadillopeppers.com/hot-pepper-heat-index.html]http://www.armadillopeppers.com/hot-pep ... index.html


Birfers are toast

Lola_Getz
Posts: 2757
Joined: Tue Mar 03, 2009 5:40 am

Recipes!

#11

Post by Lola_Getz » Tue Jun 21, 2011 8:16 am

( They did get me hooked on Frank's Red Hot sauce mixed with tuna salad and spread on crackers at 3 AM though. Now when I hear the new Frank's commercials "I put that sh.. on everything!" I crack up! )I love Frank's Red Hot sauce. When the supermarket in my small English town finally started stocking it about a year ago, I actually asked them if I could buy it by the case just so I'd have some stockpiled in the event they decided to stop selling it. There's not much I don't like it with. Ice cream, maybe, but I'm sure I could figure out a way to make it work.



BFB
Posts: 5283
Joined: Mon Jan 17, 2011 11:48 pm

Recipes!

#12

Post by BFB » Tue Jun 21, 2011 8:32 am

( They did get me hooked on Frank's Red Hot sauce mixed with tuna salad and spread on crackers at 3 AM though. Now when I hear the new Frank's commercials "I put that sh.. on everything!" I crack up! )I love Frank's Red Hot sauce. When the supermarket in my small English town finally started stocking it about a year ago, I actually asked them if I could buy it by the case just so I'd have some stockpiled in the event they decided to stop selling it. There's not much I don't like it with. Ice cream, maybe, but I'm sure I could figure out a way to make it work.The original sauce for Buffalo wings ...



Lola_Getz
Posts: 2757
Joined: Tue Mar 03, 2009 5:40 am

Recipes!

#13

Post by Lola_Getz » Tue Jun 21, 2011 8:47 am

The original sauce for Buffalo wings ...I thought it might be! During all my years of living in the UK, the only place I've ever found that prepares Buffalo wings the way they're supposed to be cooked is in my own kitchen. By me. Using Frank's sauce. Generally, when you buy wings in Britain, they're already slathered with barbeque sauce (barbeque sauce!) prior to cooking, which means most of it slides off and what's left gets burned. They also don't usually cut the whole wing into two pieces to separate the drumette from the wing, and that just offends my wing-loving sensibilities.



User avatar
Dr. Kenneth Noisewater
Posts: 5002
Joined: Thu Jun 24, 2010 4:28 pm
Location: East Coast
Contact:

Recipes!

#14

Post by Dr. Kenneth Noisewater » Tue Jun 21, 2011 9:13 am

The original sauce for Buffalo wings ...I thought it might be! During all my years of living in the UK, the only place I've ever found that prepares Buffalo wings the way they're supposed to be cooked is in my own kitchen. By me. Using Frank's sauce. Generally, when you buy wings in Britain, they're already slathered with barbeque sauce (barbeque sauce!) prior to cooking, which means most of it slides off and what's left gets burned. They also don't usually cut the whole wing into two pieces to separate the drumette from the wing, and that just offends my wing-loving sensibilities.Those damned brits can't get anything right!!!



User avatar
Princess foofypants
Posts: 3004
Joined: Wed Nov 04, 2015 9:31 pm

Recipes!

#15

Post by Princess foofypants » Tue Jun 21, 2011 9:43 am

The original sauce for Buffalo wings ...I thought it might be! During all my years of living in the UK, the only place I've ever found that prepares Buffalo wings the way they're supposed to be cooked is in my own kitchen. By me. Using Frank's sauce. Generally, when you buy wings in Britain, they're already slathered with barbeque sauce (barbeque sauce!) prior to cooking, which means most of it slides off and what's left gets burned. They also don't usually cut the whole wing into two pieces to separate the drumette from the wing, and that just offends my wing-loving sensibilities.Those damned brits can't get anything right!!!My fave Brit version of getting American food wrong... at a Little Chef outside Penrith I ordered nachos. And got a plateful of fritos, a wedge of lettuce and what appeared to be thousand island dressing



Lola_Getz
Posts: 2757
Joined: Tue Mar 03, 2009 5:40 am

Recipes!

#16

Post by Lola_Getz » Tue Jun 21, 2011 9:45 am

Those damned brits can't get anything right!!!Sunday lunch. And beer. And music (and music festivals). And healthcare.I could go on and on, but this is about wings and ORYR...



User avatar
Dr. Kenneth Noisewater
Posts: 5002
Joined: Thu Jun 24, 2010 4:28 pm
Location: East Coast
Contact:

Recipes!

#17

Post by Dr. Kenneth Noisewater » Tue Jun 21, 2011 10:48 am

Those damned brits can't get anything right!!!Sunday lunch. And beer. And music (and music festivals). And healthcare.I could go on and on, but this is about wings and ORYR...Try ordering a cheeseburger



User avatar
Reality Check
Posts: 15129
Joined: Fri Feb 20, 2009 8:09 pm
Location: USA
Contact:

Recipes!

#18

Post by Reality Check » Tue Jun 21, 2011 10:53 am

I was in Poland some years ago and decided to try a Mexican place. Instead of lettuce they put shredded cabbage on tacos. It was pretty bad. I shouldn't have been surprised. I had ribs at another place and they served Cole slaw and cooked red cabbage as the sides.


"“If you’re not outraged, you’re not paying attention.”

Heather Heyer, November 2016

Lola_Getz
Posts: 2757
Joined: Tue Mar 03, 2009 5:40 am

Recipes!

#19

Post by Lola_Getz » Tue Jun 21, 2011 11:08 am

I had ribs at another place and they served Cole slaw and cooked red cabbage as the sides.A close friend married a girl from Warsaw. From what I can tell over the years, she serves red cabbage at damn near every meal. I half expect to see it at breakfast when we visit. Good thing I like cabbage.



BFB
Posts: 5283
Joined: Mon Jan 17, 2011 11:48 pm

Recipes!

#20

Post by BFB » Tue Jun 21, 2011 11:11 am

The original sauce for Buffalo wings ...I thought it might be! During all my years of living in the UK, the only place I've ever found that prepares Buffalo wings the way they're supposed to be cooked is in my own kitchen. By me. Using Frank's sauce. Generally, when you buy wings in Britain, they're already slathered with barbeque sauce (barbeque sauce!) prior to cooking, which means most of it slides off and what's left gets burned. They also don't usually cut the whole wing into two pieces to separate the drumette from the wing, and that just offends my wing-loving sensibilities.Ugh. I dig the barbecue wings, but they're not Buffalo wings.





I went to a place in Florida once that allegedly had them; they made 'em with Tabasco sauce.





One of my college GFs was a Buffalo-area native; we went to visit her folks one weekend and she took me to one of the main wing bars in teh city. We sat down and the waitress said, what kind of beer do you want, and what size order of wings? There was just no question that that's what you were there for. That was my indoctrination.





Frank's and butter and deep-fried wing pieces. That's it.



User avatar
Foggy
Posts: 27088
Joined: Tue Jan 20, 2009 12:00 pm
Location: Fogbow HQ
Occupation: Dick Tater

Recipes!

#21

Post by Foggy » Tue Jun 21, 2011 3:42 pm

Generally, when you buy wings in Britain, they're already slathered with barbeque sauce (barbeque sauce!) prior to cooking, which means most of it slides off and what's left gets burned.Burned by a Brit, not legit!


Mr. William L. Bryan is the root of a great deal of criminal mischief. And yet, Mr. Bryan remains at large.

Lola_Getz
Posts: 2757
Joined: Tue Mar 03, 2009 5:40 am

Recipes!

#22

Post by Lola_Getz » Tue Jun 21, 2011 3:44 pm

Generally, when you buy wings in Britain, they're already slathered with barbeque sauce (barbeque sauce!) prior to cooking, which means most of it slides off and what's left gets burned.Burned by a Brit, not legit!Foggy... =)) I wonder if the President had any cooking tips for David Cameron when they had their little barbeque at 10 Downing Street last month.



Paul Pieniezny
Posts: 1484
Joined: Fri Feb 20, 2009 8:42 am

Recipes!

#23

Post by Paul Pieniezny » Wed Jun 22, 2011 9:00 pm

I had ribs at another place and they served Cole slaw and cooked red cabbage as the sides.A close friend married a girl from Warsaw. From what I can tell over the years, she serves red cabbage at damn near every meal. I half expect to see it at breakfast when we visit. Good thing I like cabbage.Are you sure that was red cabbage and not one loaf of it with a lot of red beet (burak)? Contrary to what at least West Europeans think, Poles are as enamoured of red beet as Russians. Borshch (spelled barszcz of course) from red beet is a staple soup in Poland (next to zhurek). It is difficult to avoid cabbage leaves and/or red beet when eating in Poland.On the good side, in Belgium red beet juice was recently scientifically proven to be the best drink for ... cyclists. It is even better than those wonder drinks specifically designed to help recuperating and whatever. Just imagine, something completely natural.However, people who have never drunk it before, should be careful the first time so as not to exaggerate and get bad reactions from your system. And the variety straight from the garden (like ours) makes stains on your clothing that are difficult to remove.



Somerset
Posts: 3790
Joined: Sat Aug 08, 2009 5:52 am
Location: Silicon Valley
Occupation: Lab rat

Recipes!

#24

Post by Somerset » Wed Jun 22, 2011 11:46 pm

The original sauce for Buffalo wings ...I thought it might be! During all my years of living in the UK, the only place I've ever found that prepares Buffalo wings the way they're supposed to be cooked is in my own kitchen. By me. Using Frank's sauce. Generally, when you buy wings in Britain, they're already slathered with barbeque sauce (barbeque sauce!) prior to cooking, which means most of it slides off and what's left gets burned. They also don't usually cut the whole wing into two pieces to separate the drumette from the wing, and that just offends my wing-loving sensibilities.Ugh. I dig the barbecue wings, but they're not Buffalo wings.





I went to a place in Florida once that allegedly had them; they made 'em with Tabasco sauce.





One of my college GFs was a Buffalo-area native; we went to visit her folks one weekend and she took me to one of the main wing bars in teh city. We sat down and the waitress said, what kind of beer do you want, and what size order of wings? There was just no question that that's what you were there for. That was my indoctrination.





Frank's and butter and deep-fried wing pieces. That's it.Clarified butter, to be precise.



User avatar
Whatever4
Posts: 11604
Joined: Tue Sep 08, 2009 6:36 am
Location: Mainely in the plain
Occupation: Visiting doctors.

Recipes!

#25

Post by Whatever4 » Thu Jun 23, 2011 12:59 am

However, people who have never drunk it before, should be careful the first time so as not to exaggerate and get bad reactions from your system. And the variety straight from the garden (like ours) makes stains on your clothing that are difficult to remove.You'll also have a nice scare the first time you try fresh red beets. Remember you've eaten beets and remind yourself that no, you are not bleeding internally. :shock: :oops: This too shall pass.


"[Moderate] doesn't mean you don't have views. It just means your views aren't predictable ideologically one way or the other, and you're trying to follow the facts where they lead and reach your own conclusions."
-- Sen. King (I-ME)

Post Reply

Return to “The Lounge”