Housing the World's Really, Really Rich

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Whatever4
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Re: Housing the World's Really, Really Rich

#51

Post by Whatever4 »

AndyinPA wrote:
Thu Jun 28, 2018 5:22 pm
That's about the ugliest thing I've ever seen in a house, and I tend to like contemporary. :sick:

I don't understand why someone would want a furnished house, except to rent. Even when I occasionally watch "Fixer Upper" or something along that line, I think I'd rather pick my own furniture and accessories. I know it makes the final product look good for TV, but it just doesn't appeal to me.
I can see buying a vacation home furnished. Lots of work to get all that furniture and stuff.
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Re: Housing the World's Really, Really Rich

#52

Post by Whatever4 »

MN-Skeptic wrote:
Thu Jun 28, 2018 5:37 pm
If I had $100M to spend on a house, I would have one built to my dream specifications. I certainly wouldn't buy one already built.
It’s probably not your only house, and you are a busy person. You are parking money anyway. Too much trouble to build.
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Re: Housing the World's Really, Really Rich

#53

Post by AndyinPA »

Whatever4 wrote:
Thu Jun 28, 2018 10:14 pm
AndyinPA wrote:
Thu Jun 28, 2018 5:22 pm
That's about the ugliest thing I've ever seen in a house, and I tend to like contemporary. :sick:

I don't understand why someone would want a furnished house, except to rent. Even when I occasionally watch "Fixer Upper" or something along that line, I think I'd rather pick my own furniture and accessories. I know it makes the final product look good for TV, but it just doesn't appeal to me.
I can see buying a vacation home furnished. Lots of work to get all that furniture and stuff.
Yeah, that makes sense, especially if it's at all remote.
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Re: Housing the World's Really, Really Rich

#54

Post by Sam the Centipede »

And some rich people surely want the trappings and furbelows of wealth but are not interested in choosing the specific items. Why not let someone else do the legwork and start with a habitable house? Then change any items or any rooms to one's personal taste later.

Five swimming pools baffles me though: I could understand one outside and one inside, but that seems pointless. Unless wives and/or kids are to be kept in purdah: "Attention please, now hear this. Children under sixteen and their mothers will assemble at pool five at three p.m. for a swim party with high tea. Category One guests are invited to pool one at four p.m. for cocktails and canapés. Other guests and family please consult the noticeboards. That is all. Have a nice day."

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Re: Housing the World's Really, Really Rich

#55

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LA Times
Billion with a 'b': Prized Beverly Crest acreage aims for $1,000,000,000



On a summit above Beverly Hills, a sweeping 157-acre property touted as the city’s finest undeveloped parcel is hitting the market with L.A.’s first-ever 10-figure asking price: $1 billion.

It’s being branded as “The Mountain,” and fittingly so. The undeveloped acreage sits at the highest point in the 90210 ZIP Code, and it’s — by a mile — the most expensive listing in the history of Los Angeles.

For reference, a 120-acre plot owned by Microsoft Corp. co-founder Paul Allen is on the market in the same Beverly Hills Post Office area for $150 million. Last year, handbag tycoon Bruce Makowsky made waves when he listed his four-story mega-mansion in Bel-Air for $250 million.

Aaron Kirman, the listing agent, calls it “the crown jewel of Beverly Hills,” noting that the potential is unparalleled. Views stretch from downtown Los Angeles to Catalina Island, and the closest neighbor is half a mile away. Disneyland, at roughly 85 acres, is a little more than half the size of the property.
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Re: Housing the World's Really, Really Rich

#56

Post by RTH10260 »

Dang - :twisted: why is Teh Donald not aquiring it, he is a touted billionaire, and it looks like a good place for the priciest golf club evahhh with a select choice of clientele in reach :lol:

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Re: Housing the World's Really, Really Rich

#57

Post by ZekeB »

Imagine pumping water to that height. Of course the sewer would work well. Utilities like gas and electricity would be a biatch too. What a waste of money to put any residences on that knoll.
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Re: Housing the World's Really, Really Rich

#58

Post by fierceredpanda »

Amazing to me that no one in this thread has posted about this.
Antilia is a private home in South Mumbai, India. It is owned by Mukesh Ambani, chairman of Reliance Industries and has a staff of 600 to maintain the residence 24 hours a day.

As of November 2014, it is deemed to be the world's most expensive residential property, after Buckingham Palace, which is designated as a crown property. It is thus the world's most expensive private residential property, valued over $1 billion. Its controversial design and ostentatious use by a single family has made it infamous across the world, with severe criticism in the architectural press and mockery in popular media

It is located on Altamount Road, Cumballa Hill in Mumbai.
Image

American plutocrats need to step their game up.
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Re: Housing the World's Really, Really Rich

#59

Post by Notorial Dissent »

Other than staggeringly ugly you mean??
The fact that you sincerely and wholeheartedly believe that the “Law of Gravity” is unconstitutional and a violation of your sovereign rights, does not absolve you of adherence to it.

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Re: Housing the World's Really, Really Rich

#60

Post by vic »

ZekeB wrote:
Mon Jul 30, 2018 8:29 am
Imagine pumping water to that height. Of course the sewer would work well. Utilities like gas and electricity would be a biatch too. What a waste of money to put any residences on that knoll.
Judging by how green it is, along with the trees visible in that picture, and lighting in others in the article, it appears that it already has utilities (at least water and electricity).

I found another article that says that utilities are already in place

https://www.forbes.com/sites/keithflame ... 5c63b95599
:snippity:
Secured Capital Partners transformed The Mountain with vital infrastructure improvements—utilities, electricity, road work, fiber optics. This includes an advanced storm drain system and water retention basin; fire hydrant booster system; and a backup generator that can power 300,000 square feet of buildings during a citywide power outage. You won't find that at Home Depot.
:snippity:

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Re: Housing the World's Really, Really Rich

#61

Post by Whatever4 »

Sadly, I already bought this condo in Maine.
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Re: Housing the World's Really, Really Rich

#62

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Vox - Kate Wagner
Betsy DeVos’s summer home deserves a special place in McMansion Hell



Two weeks ago, somebody untied Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos’s $40 million yacht from its mooring. It got me thinking about another opulent display of wealth owned by DeVos: her 22,000-square-foot nautical-themed summer mansion, located in Holland, Michigan. Just a few more years of climate change and it’ll be floating too.

My mission for the past three years as the creator of the architectural humor blog McMansion Hell has been to unpack what makes mansions like DeVos’s so terrible, from both an architectural and social standpoint. It’s bad enough that we have a president who oversaw a massive redistribution of wealth toward the already wealthy through tax breaks. What’s worse is that obscenely wealthy people like him waste all their money building pseudo-castles and other eclectic tragedies, all while wagging their finger at the rest of us telling us to eat cake.

Trump official and fellow rich person DeVos just rolled back Obama administration loan forgiveness rules for students defrauded by for-profit colleges. It’s unsurprising that she doesn’t want to forgive the student loan debts of those defrauded by for-profit colleges considering that she got her net worth of more than $1 billion from her husband’s company, the multilevel marketing giant Amway, which is often described as a cult. Meanwhile, her brother Erik Prince owns the Blackwater firm, which essentially sells mercenaries. As we can see, we are not dealing with nice people.

As someone who owes tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt, getting paid to make fun of DeVos’s tacky seaside decor is one of few ways to both feed myself and make myself feel better. With that, I’d like to dedicate this essay to all of the public school teachers who taught me how to write.
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Re: Housing the World's Really, Really Rich

#63

Post by Whatever4 »

This boat is parked down the street from us. It’s REALLY REALLY BIG.

https://www.pressherald.com/2018/09/06/ ... s-largest/

Here’s a photo my neighbor snapped of fire fighters practicing across the street from us. The mast of this monster is just left of center.
F2A06E94-0292-4FD1-ACD5-8656DC2D7CD6.jpeg
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Re: Housing the World's Really, Really Rich

#64

Post by Jcolvin2 »

Welcome to Zilloe, Which is the Same as Zillow But Only Includes Houses You Can’t Afford in Places You’ll Never Live

https://www.mcsweeneys.net/articles/wel ... never-live

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Re: Housing the World's Really, Really Rich

#65

Post by Ragnite_Powered »

Regarding the housing of the richest of the rich, I did a quick google to find the most expensive piece of real estate money can buy, but I lost to you guys ; the French villa I've found is worth "only" $88 million : https://tranio.com/france/adt/1720930/

Still one hell of a hefty sum to cough out, who will be the lucky Saudi prince?

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Re: Housing the World's Really, Really Rich

#66

Post by Whatever4 »

Ragnite_Powered wrote:
Fri Sep 28, 2018 10:54 am
Regarding the housing of the richest of the rich, I did a quick google to find the most expensive piece of real estate money can buy, but I lost to you guys ; the French villa I've found is worth "only" $88 million : https://tranio.com/france/adt/1720930/

Still one hell of a hefty sum to cough out, who will be the lucky Saudi prince?
Sorry, that bedroom wallpaper is awful. I’m not buying a place where I’d have to deal with wallpaper.
"[Moderate] doesn't mean you don't have views. It just means your views aren't predictable ideologically one way or the other, and you're trying to follow the facts where they lead and reach your own conclusions."
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Re: Housing the World's Really, Really Rich

#67

Post by RTH10260 »

Ragnite_Powered wrote:
Fri Sep 28, 2018 10:54 am
Regarding the housing of the richest of the rich, I did a quick google to find the most expensive piece of real estate money can buy, but I lost to you guys ; the French villa I've found is worth "only" $88 million : https://tranio.com/france/adt/1720930/

Still one hell of a hefty sum to cough out, who will be the lucky Saudi prince?
A Saudi princling will first spend that amount on his superyacht. If there is some petty cash left he may consider a land base. Too bad it is located in France and not Monaco.

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Re: Housing the World's Really, Really Rich

#68

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Curbed-New York
Crowning $50M penthouse at Zaha Hadid’s High Line condo reappears



Three years after sales launched at Zaha Hadid’s swooping High Line condo, 520 West 28th Street, developer Related Companies is ready to unveil the building’s crowing penthouse, once again. The New York Times first reported on the pinnacle penthouse, which will officially list on the market on October 18 and will reportedly ask $50 million, the same price it was asking when it first listed.

The triplex condo is called Penthouse 37 and comes with five bedrooms and six and a half bathrooms spread out over nearly 7,000 square feet of space. Four of the five bedrooms are located on the lowest level of the triplex, including the master suite. Each of the three guest bedrooms have ensuite marble bathrooms. The master suite has a dressing room, balcony, and two bathrooms among its features. Swanky features abound in this development like the glass walls in one of the bathrooms, which can be turned opaque with the flip of a switch, as the Times explains.

The living room, library, kitchen, and a fifth bedroom all take up the second level of this home. The living room comes with 11-foot-tall ceilings, a fireplace, wraparound glass walls, and white oak floors. The kitchen features objects like the kitchen island that were custom designed by Zaha Hadid before her death in 2016. There’s also a suite of Gaggenau appliances.

The top floor, for the most part, is occupied by the massive rooftop terrace, which offers views of the High Line, Hudson Yards, and the newly opened art galleries, High Line Nine. All three floors of the triplex will be connected by a sculptural staircase designed by Hadid, but each of the floors is also accessible by an elevator.

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Re: Housing the World's Really, Really Rich

#69

Post by Addie »

New York Mag
The High Line Has Become a Tunnel Through Glass Towers



The High Line was an epiphany when it opened in 2009, a moment suspended between neglect and possibility. The strips of curated wilderness, the medieval-looking iron railings, the disorienting views, the way the viaduct ducked beneath buildings or squeezed through narrow openings to emerge into a broader cityscape—the whole sequence contained the city’s irresistible theatricality. That mirage has taken a decade to dissipate. (Though it is preserved in Google Street View, ca. 2011.)

Today, the High Line serves as an elevated cattle chute for tourists, who shuffle from the Whitney to Hudson Yards, squeezed between high glass walls and luxury guard towers. The views are mostly gone, which is a good thing because stopping to admire one would cause a 16-pedestrian pileup. The rail-level traffic mirrors the congestion overhead, caused by construction so hellbent on milking New York’s waning real estate hyper-boom that any patch of land bigger than a tick’s front yard is considered suitable for luxury condos. ...

Even before that first day, the seeds of the High Line’s destruction were already scattered among the new plantings. The park came to exist because a small coterie of activists believed they could transform an eyesore into an amenity. An abandoned delivery route for sides of beef, they argued, could become a kind of fast-acting yeast for real-estate prices. But even if you understood that a future of multimillion-dollar penthouses was baked into the park from the beginning, even if you foresaw that a neighborhood where lamb’s blood ran in the streets would attract architectural talent from all over the world, even if you understood that preserving an industrial relic would change the city all around it—even if all that was clear, you still would not have been prepared for today’s scrum of construction. New and still unfinished buildings crowd the length of the High Line like guests at a party where everyone is talking too loud, standing too close, and jockeying for attention, while nobody listens to anyone else. ...

The context that counts is the park, the marketable glimpses of the Empire State Building or a wedge of water, and the presumptively fabulous existences unfolding among all the hardwood flooring, recessed lighting, and German appliances. Renderings of each new building discreetly edit out the others, as if each development existed in a becalmed post-industrial bubble of its own. A few new buildings seem resentful that a few old ones persist, selfishly hoarding square footage that could be profitably modernized. The bully at 500 West 25th, by the developer and architecture firm GDS, cantilevers menacingly over the shrimpy tenement that houses Marty’s Auto Body, as if willing it to scram.

The rap on luxury development in New York is that it’s geared to absentee owners, who barely stop in for a shower on a layover between continents. But that may change. The Treasury Department has tightened rules for high-end, all-cash real estate purchases, aimed at preventing buyers from hiding their identities behind shell companies. Shady gajillionaires now have to slink off and launder their embezzled fortunes somewhere else, which could land some imperial apartments on the bargain table.

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Re: Housing the World's Really, Really Rich

#70

Post by Addie »

Ooooh, too weird. :?

Curbed
Massive faux chateaux development sits empty after developer goes bankrupt



Nestled into the beautiful rolling hills of central Turkey, there’s a housing development of apocalyptic proportions. Rows of identical faux chateaux sit empty at the Burj Al Babas complex after its developer, Sarot Group, recently filed for bankruptcy.

When construction started in 2014, the Burj Al Babas was supposed to be a luxury residential retreat for wealthy investors from the Middle East. The $200 million complex called for 732 identical homes in the style of the French chateaux, each with an ornate facade, Juliet balconies, and a round turret fit for a princess. The interiors could be customized to the buyer’s desires.

The cookie-cutter mini-castles were going for anywhere from $370,000 and $530,000, and according to Bloomberg, plenty of people were already buying them. Just not enough, apparently. By the time the developer filed for bankruptcy, they had completed 587 homes and were $27 million in debt. ...

Meanwhile, the remaining chateaux sit in various states of unfinished, only adding to the dystopian Disney vibe. Seen from above, the development looks like rows of forgotten life-sized doll houses crammed together on dingy lots—creepy, yes, but we have to say, it’s also kind of striking.

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Re: Housing the World's Really, Really Rich

#71

Post by Addie »

The Guardian
Super-tall, super-skinny, super-expensive: the 'pencil towers' of New York's super-rich

An extreme concentration of wealth in a city where even the air is for sale has produced a new breed of needle-like tower.



It is rare in the history of architecture for a new type of building to emerge. The Romans’ discovery of concrete birthed the great domes and fortifications of its empire. The Victorians’ development of steel led to an era of majestic bridges and vaulted train sheds. The American invention of the elevator created the first skyscrapers in Chicago. Now, we are seeing a new type of structure that perfectly embodies the 21st-century age of technical ingenuity and extreme inequality. A heady confluence of engineering prowess, zoning loopholes and an unparalleled concentration of personal wealth have together spawned a new species of super-tall, super-skinny, super-expensive spire.

Any visitor to New York over the past few years will have witnessed this curious new breed of pencil-thin tower. Poking up above the Manhattan skyline like etiolated beanpoles, they seem to defy the laws of both gravity and commercial sense. They stand like naked elevator shafts awaiting their floors, raw extrusions of capital piled up until it hits the clouds.

These towers are not only the product of advances in construction technology – and a global surfeit of super-rich buyers – but a zoning policy that allows a developer to acquire unused airspace nearby, add it to their own lot, and erect a vast structure without any kind of public review process taking place. The face of New York is changing at a rate not seen for decades, and the deals that are driving it are all happening behind closed doors. ...

Form has always followed finance in New York, and this latest architectural byproduct of excess global wealth is no exception. Building very tall has been technically possible for some time, but it hasn’t made much commercial sense: the higher you go, the cost of building often exceeds the returns. That is, until now.

Like leggy plants given too much fertiliser, these buildings are a symptom of a city irrigated with too much money. The world’s population of ultra-high-net-worth individuals, a super-elite with assets of at least $30m, has now mushroomed beyond 250,000 people, all in need of somewhere to store their wealth. More than a third of them are based in North America, while those from riskier economic climes favour New York real estate as one of the safest places to park their cash.

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Re: Housing the World's Really, Really Rich

#72

Post by Addie »

The Guardian
House of Palestine: the architectural wonder built by a West Bank oil tycoon

The richest man in the occupied territories has indulged his passion for Palladio – by creating a replica of his Villa Rotunda and filling it with priceless treasures




A terracotta-tiled dome pokes up above an avenue of cypress trees, crowning a creamy classical villa that bears the unmistakable influence of the great Italian Renaissance architect Andrea Palladio. On each of its four identical sides, flights of stone steps lead up to porticos topped with pediments, which look out across a rolling landscape of vineyards, olive groves and villages perched on distant hills. It could be Vicenza, were it not for the clusters of minarets rising out of the sprawling city in the valley below – or the fact that the distant hill towns are in fact Israeli settlements.

This is Beit Falasteen, the House of Palestine, a surreal replica of Palladio’s 16th-century Villa La Rotonda transplanted to a hilltop above the Palestinian city of Nablus. It is the home of Munib al-Masri, the richest man in the occupied territories, an oil tycoon turned philanthropist with a passion for antiques, variously known as the Godfather of Palestine and the Palestinian Rothschild – or, to local taxi drivers, the man in the palace on the hill. On one of the highest points in the land, he has built himself a carbon copy of Palladio’s seminal villa, with a few “improvements” of his own. ...

Standing on the brow of Mount Gerizim, the steep peak south of Nablus in the West Bank, the house occupies a hallowed site of biblical legend. Canaanite tales and Samaritan manuscripts describe it as the place where Adam met Eve, where Noah built his great vessel, and where the prophet Abraham sacrificed a goat in place of his son, Ismail. The Samaritans, whose main population still lives nearby, hold it to be the highest, oldest and most central mountain in the world, the very navel of civilisation.

It should come as no surprise, therefore, that when Masri started excavations for the foundations, he unearthed a fifth-century Byzantine monastery with one of the largest expanses of intact mosaic floor in the region. He duly incorporated into the design as a curio in the basement of his home. It is now just one of the innumerable priceless treasures that fill this palatial fantasy that he is to publish a book about, detailing every painting and piece of furniture in his regal residence, the culmination of a lifetime of collecting.

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Re: Housing the World's Really, Really Rich

#73

Post by AndyinPA »

Addie wrote:
Tue Feb 05, 2019 2:45 pm
The Guardian
Super-tall, super-skinny, super-expensive: the 'pencil towers' of New York's super-rich

An extreme concentration of wealth in a city where even the air is for sale has produced a new breed of needle-like tower.



:snippity:


I read that article yesterday. This is all headed for a bad ending. And being able to buy the air is something that could only happen in a world where we have way too many billionaires and millionaires.

And the faux chateaux? :sick:
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Re: Housing the World's Really, Really Rich

#74

Post by RTH10260 »

AndyinPA wrote:
Wed Feb 06, 2019 2:21 pm
Addie wrote:
Tue Feb 05, 2019 2:45 pm
The Guardian
Super-tall, super-skinny, super-expensive: the 'pencil towers' of New York's super-rich

An extreme concentration of wealth in a city where even the air is for sale has produced a new breed of needle-like tower.



:snippity:


I read that article yesterday. This is all headed for a bad ending. And being able to buy the air is something that could only happen in a world where we have way too many billionaires and millionaires.

And the faux chateaux? :sick:
The airspace above building sites is governed by zoning laws. They restrict the density of structures and within some limits how much shade is generated. Moving the rights of "air space" from one site to another will keep the prior site lower when redeveloped down the timeline. I don't know how the rules are in NYC but elsewhere the "air space" must be acquired from the direct neighbours.

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Re: Housing the World's Really, Really Rich

#75

Post by Addie »

Bloomberg
NYC Brokers Say Pied-a-Terre Tax Is 'Class Warfare' on the Rich

High-end real estate brokers in New York worry that foreign second-home buyers are feeling under assault from all sides and may end up going elsewhere. Already wary of President Donald Trump’s anti-immigrant rhetoric, they now see a planned tax on absentee owners as a swipe from the political left.

“The international buyer has basically gone away over the past two years,” said real estate broker Martin Eiden at Compass, who sells about $50 million of residential property a year. “There’s only so much that people will take -- they’ll either go somewhere else or they’ll just get a hotel room.”

The proposed tax would apply to properties above $5 million owned by non-residents. Governor Andrew Cuomo says the state needs it to pay for transit fixes. Mayor Bill de Blasio says the rich should pay more, especially those who pay no income taxes while full-time residents bear the costs of services that make New York City so attractive to foreigners and out-of-staters.

The tax may slow sales at the upper end of New York’s housing market, but it could also bring benefits that go beyond fixing the subway, including encouraging developers to focus on units that are more affordable to permanent residents, said Moses Gates, a vice president at the Regional Plan Association. In the long run, everyone’s property values benefit from safety, security and cultural amenities funded by full-time residents.

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