Trump's Trade Follicy

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RoadScholar
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Re: Trump's Trade Follicy

#51

Post by RoadScholar »

My shop bought CVG (clear vertical grain) Douglas Fir for a big client's project early this spring. They ordered a second phase in June and the Fir had jumped over 20%. So the Trump tarriff on Canadian lumber took several hundred dollars straight out of my personal bottom line.

Thanks, Trump!

The best part? The US doesn't have any economically viable production of CVG Fir. So this 'protectionism' isn't even protecting anything. :madguy:
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Re: Trump's Trade Follicy

#52

Post by maydijo »

RoadScholar wrote:My shop bought CVG (clear vertical grain) Douglas Fir for a big client's project early this spring. They ordered a second phase in June and the Fir had jumped over 20%. So the Trump tarriff on Canadian lumber took several hundred dollars straight out of my personal bottom line.

Thanks, Trump!

The best part? The US doesn't have any economically viable production of CVG Fir. So this 'protectionism' isn't even protecting anything. :madguy:
That sucks! No way you can pass the cost on to the client? Surely if materials have gone up that drastically, they'd understand?
Fun fact: In Australia, Douglas fir is called Oregon wood. But it took me years to learn that; every time I asked at a timber yard what sort of wood it was, they'd look at me, confused, and say, "It's Oregon wood, it says right there on the label." I'd explain that I'm from Oregon and there is no such thing as Oregon wood, and ask what tree it came from; and they would just look at me like I was off my rocker. Now I'm thinking most of this Oregon wood probably came from Canada, ha!

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Re: Trump's Trade Follicy

#53

Post by RoadScholar »

maydijo wrote:
RoadScholar wrote:My shop bought CVG (clear vertical grain) Douglas Fir for a big client's project early this spring. They ordered a second phase in June and the Fir had jumped over 20%. So the Trump tarriff on Canadian lumber took several hundred dollars straight out of my personal bottom line.

Thanks, Trump!

The best part? The US doesn't have any economically viable production of CVG Fir. So this 'protectionism' isn't even protecting anything. :madguy:
That sucks! No way you can pass the cost on to the client? Surely if materials have gone up that drastically, they'd understand?
Fun fact: In Australia, Douglas fir is called Oregon wood. But it took me years to learn that; every time I asked at a timber yard what sort of wood it was, they'd look at me, confused, and say, "It's Oregon wood, it says right there on the label." I'd explain that I'm from Oregon and there is no such thing as Oregon wood, and ask what tree it came from; and they would just look at me like I was off my rocker. Now I'm thinking most of this Oregon wood probably came from Canada, ha!
I had already quoted the second phase. And some Doug Fir is harvested in Oregon, but it's mainly for use in SPF construction-grade products. CVG is from really big trees, as it's essentially quarter-sawn.
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Re: Trump's Trade Follicy

#54

Post by Addie »

Politico
Trump’s Trade Pullout Roils Rural America

EAGLE GROVE, Iowa — On a cloud-swept landscape dotted with grain elevators, a meat producer called Prestage Farms is building a 700,000-square-foot processing plant. The gleaming new factory is both the great hope of Wright County, which voted by a 2-1 margin for Donald Trump, and the victim of one of Trump’s first policy moves, his decision to pull out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

For much of industrial America, the TPP was a suspect deal, the successor to the North American Free Trade Agreement, which some argue led to a massive offshoring of U.S. jobs to Mexico. But for the already struggling agricultural sector, the sprawling 12-nation TPP, covering 40 percent of the world’s economy, was a lifeline. It was a chance to erase punishing tariffs that restricted the United States — the onetime “breadbasket of the world” — from selling its meats, grains and dairy products to massive importers of foodstuffs such as Japan and Vietnam.

The decision to pull out of the trade deal has become a double hit on places like Eagle Grove. The promised bump of $10 billion in agricultural output over 15 years, based on estimates by the U.S. International Trade Commission, won’t materialize. But Trump’s decision to withdraw from the pact also cleared the way for rival exporters such as Australia, New Zealand and the European Union to negotiate even lower tariffs with importing nations, creating potentially greater competitive advantages over U.S. exports.

A POLITICO analysis found that the 11 other TPP countries are now involved in a whopping 27 separate trade negotiations with each other, other major trading powers in the region like China and massive blocs like the EU. Those efforts range from exploratory conversations to deals already signed and awaiting ratification. Seven of the most significant deals for U.S. farmers were either launched or concluded in the five months since the United States withdrew from the TPP.
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Re: Trump's Trade Follicy

#55

Post by Chilidog »

And the sad thing is that they will continue to support Trump.

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Re: Trump's Trade Follicy

#56

Post by Dolly »

Trump’s Stalled Trade Agenda Leaves Industries in a Lurch
By ALAN RAPPEPORTAUG. 7, 2017

Donald J. Trump promised Americans that they would be exhausted from “winning” on trade under his presidency. But nearly seven months after Mr. Trump took office, the industries he vowed to protect have become tired of something else: waiting.

After beginning his presidency with a bang by withdrawing from the Trans-Pacific Partnership pact in January, Mr. Trump has accomplished little else of significance when it comes to reorienting deals with other countries. Instead, his administration has been consumed by investigations into possible Russian collusion and a failed attempt to repeal the Affordable Care Act. It just hasn’t been able to get around to the complicated rules that dictate international commerce.

For many businesses that had raised their hopes, frustration is mounting by the day.

America’s steelworkers are on edge as they wait for Mr. Trump to fulfill his promise to place tariffs on steel imports. Home builders are desperate for the president to cut a deal with Canada to end a dispute over its softwood lumber exports. And cattle ranchers are longing for a bilateral pact with Japan to ease the flow of beef exports. <SNIP>
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/07/us/p ... -news&_r=0

https://archive.is/a2uMA#selection-2093.25-2093.110
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Re: Trump's Trade Follicy

#57

Post by Addie »

Politico
U.S. sets tough tone with Canada and Mexico as NAFTA talks begin

The Trump administration set a tough tone Wednesday at the start of the renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement, driving a wedge into its relationship with Canada and Mexico.

U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer invoked President Donald Trump's strong criticism of the deal, saying that the agreement had "fundamentally failed many, many Americans."

"I want to be clear that he is not interested in a mere tweaking of a few provisions and a couple of updated chapters,” Lighthizer said during opening remarks at the Washington Marriott Wardman Park before the start of round one of the talks.

"For countless Americans, this agreement has failed,” Lighthizer said, while Canadian Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland and Mexican Economy Minister Ildefonso Guajardo looked on. “We cannot ignore the huge trade deficits, the lost manufacturing jobs, the businesses that have closed or moved because of incentives, intended or not, in the current agreement.”

Although the U.S. economy has added more than 1 million jobs since Trump took office, his popularity has steadily eroded. That makes a quick victory in the NAFTA negotiations all the more important in showing he can deliver for his base.
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Re: Trump's Trade Follicy

#58

Post by Suranis »

And Canada and Mexico will know that he needs a quick Victory here, so they will be prepared to be hard as nails here. Trumps patented yelling down the phone and pretending to be tough wont work here. If he wants it fast so he can crow about a "victory", they will happily take the US to the cleaners to give it to him. Why not? They have zero incentive to go easy on the USA here, when Trump has given them the advantage.

Trump wanted the renegotiation, and by God he has got it
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Re: Trump's Trade Follicy

#59

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Reuters
Auto groups side with Canada, Mexico on NAFTA origin rules

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Auto industry groups from Canada, Mexico and the United States are pushing back against the Trump administration's demand for higher U.S. automotive content in a modernized North American Free Trade Agreement.

At talks underway this week in Washington, automaker and parts groups from all three countries were urging negotiators against tighter rules of origin, said Eduardo Solis, president of the Mexican Automotive Industry Association.

But U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer confirmed the industry's fears that the administration of President Donald Trump was seeking major changes to these rules to try to reduce the U.S. trade deficit with Mexico.

"Rules of origin, particularly on autos and auto parts, must require higher NAFTA content and substantial U.S. content. Country of origin should be verified, not 'deemed,'" Lighthizer said on Wednesday in opening remarks.

Mexican Economy Minister Ildefonso Guajardo and Canadian Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland both said they were not in favor of specific national rules of origin within NAFTA - a position that the industry agrees with.
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Re: Trump's Trade Follicy

#60

Post by RTH10260 »

Suranis wrote:And Canada and Mexico will know that he needs a quick Victory here, so they will be prepared to be hard as nails here. Trumps patented yelling down the phone and pretending to be tough wont work here. If he wants it fast so he can crow about a "victory", they will happily take the US to the cleaners to give it to him. Why not? They have zero incentive to go easy on the USA here, when Trump has given them the advantage.

Trump wanted the renegotiation, and by God he has got it
In trade deals there is no fast victory. Time to fix trade deals is measured more in years than months. Modifying a treaty means to look at each section, each paragraph. The US wants to change one item, they will be looking at two counter requests in exchange, one from Mexico, one from Canada, and if those two want to prolong the proceedings, their modification suggestions will be diffferent. Ought they agree to a new formulation, they will have to agree on how to handle transition problems. Should they once find accord and sign off on the renewed treaty, then it will be passed on to the respective governments and parliaments for ratification, another year gone past. Once done, the changes need to be put into local law and regulations, another couple of years until trade gets a real hit. Expect NATFA 2.0 to become something of Pence' 2nd administration final deal.

PS. or cancelled / renegociated by a follow up Democrat Administration...

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Re: Trump's Trade Follicy

#61

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Bloomberg News
Russian lumber industry benefiting from Canada-U.S. trade dispute

Russia has emerged as one of the winners from the trade dispute between Canada and the U.S over lumber.

The U.S. is importing more softwood lumber from overseas after it slapped tariffs on Canadian supplies, making them more expensive. Russian shipments are 42 per cent higher so far in 2017, according to U.S. government data.

To be sure, Russia accounts for a relatively small proportion of the total, while European countries such as Germany and Sweden are among the biggest suppliers to the U.S. But the shift in volumes illustrate how a political spat has quickly altered the flow of international trade.

“It seems to be that there’s something illogical that we’re not buying the lumber from our neighbors to the north, that we’re buying it from the Russians,” Jerry Howard, chief executive officer of the National Association of Home Builders, said in a telephone interview from Washington. “That’s sort of the looking glass that we’ve gone through and that’s what the market is forcing us to do now.”

The dispute has increased material costs for house builders in the U.S. by 20 per cent, according to Howard. Lumber futures traded in Chicago have gained 11 per cent this year, among the best performance of all the commodities tracked by Bloomberg. Prices fell 0.6 per cent to $364 per 1,000 board feet at 10:33 a.m. on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange.
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Re: Trump's Trade Follicy

#62

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Trump playing 'bad cop' in NAFTA negotiations

by Patrick Gillespie @CNNMoney
August 23, 2017: 12:33 PM ET

President Trump seemed to put NAFTA negotiations on thin ice Tuesday night.

"Personally, I don't think we can make a deal because we have been so badly taken advantage of," Trump said during a rally in Arizona, referring to the free trade deal between the U.S., Canada and Mexico. "I think we'll end up probably terminating NAFTA at some point."

Trump's timing was more surprising than his comments. NAFTA negotiations just started.

U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer, completed the first round of talks with leaders from Canada and Mexico on Sunday. Round 2 starts September 1st in Mexico City.

Lighthizer reiterated Wednesday that withdrawing from the trade agreement is still very much an option.
http://money.cnn.com/2017/08/23/news/ec ... index.html

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Re: Trump's Trade Follicy

#63

Post by RTH10260 »

RTH10260 wrote:
Trump playing 'bad cop' in NAFTA negotiations

by Patrick Gillespie @CNNMoney
August 23, 2017: 12:33 PM ET
:snippity:
Trump's timing was more surprising than his comments. NAFTA negotiations just started.
:snippity:
http://money.cnn.com/2017/08/23/news/ec ... index.html
I think Teh Donald is under the illusion that trade deals are something like buying or selling properties, happens overnight. He will need to learn that it ain't so.

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Re: Trump's Trade Follicy

#64

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Mexico, Canada dismiss Trump threats to scrap NAFTA trade pact
Gabriel Stargardter and David Ljunggren

MEXICO CITY/OTTAWA (Reuters) - Mexico and Canada on Wednesday dismissed U.S. President Donald Trump’s latest threat to scrap NAFTA, describing it as a negotiating tactic aimed at winning the upper hand in talks to update one of the world’s biggest trading blocs.
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa- ... SKCN1B31H1

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Re: Trump's Trade Follicy

#65

Post by Turtle »

RTH10260 wrote:
Mexico, Canada dismiss Trump threats to scrap NAFTA trade pact
Gabriel Stargardter and David Ljunggren

MEXICO CITY/OTTAWA (Reuters) - Mexico and Canada on Wednesday dismissed U.S. President Donald Trump’s latest threat to scrap NAFTA, describing it as a negotiating tactic aimed at winning the upper hand in talks to update one of the world’s biggest trading blocs.
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa- ... SKCN1B31H1
LOL this is the geopolitical version of, "put your mommy or daddy on the phone"

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Re: Trump's Trade Follicy

#66

Post by Sam the Centipede »

RTH10260 wrote: :snippity: I think Teh Donald is under the illusion that trade deals are something like buying or selling properties, happens overnight. He will need to learn that it ain't so.
;) Can you see the flaw in your prescription? ;)

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Re: Trump's Trade Follicy

#67

Post by RTH10260 »

:lol: :lol: :lol:

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Re: Trump's Trade Follicy

#68

Post by Volkonski »

Addie wrote:Bloomberg News
Russian lumber industry benefiting from Canada-U.S. trade dispute

Russia has emerged as one of the winners from the trade dispute between Canada and the U.S over lumber.

The U.S. is importing more softwood lumber from overseas after it slapped tariffs on Canadian supplies, making them more expensive. Russian shipments are 42 per cent higher so far in 2017, according to U.S. government data.

.
This is insane. :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll:
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Re: Trump's Trade Follicy

#69

Post by pipistrelle »

Volkonski wrote:
Addie wrote:Bloomberg News
Russian lumber industry benefiting from Canada-U.S. trade dispute

Russia has emerged as one of the winners from the trade dispute between Canada and the U.S over lumber.

The U.S. is importing more softwood lumber from overseas after it slapped tariffs on Canadian supplies, making them more expensive. Russian shipments are 42 per cent higher so far in 2017, according to U.S. government data.

.
This is insane. :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll:
Just think of all the extra fuel wasted on transport.

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Re: Trump's Trade Follicy

#70

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer »

Sounds like a Putin plan to me. From Vlad's mouth to Trump's ear.
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Re: Trump's Trade Follicy

#71

Post by Addie »

WaPo
While Trump bashes NAFTA, it’s Americanizing Mexico

MEXICO CITY — The vast Oasis mall, situated in the cobblestoned neighborhood where the Spanish conquistador Hernán Cortés once lived and where Frida Kahlo painted self-portraits, is an un­heralded symbol of Mexico in the era of NAFTA.

Two decades after the North American Free Trade Agreement opened the consumer floodgates here, Mexicans have become accustomed to such luxurious shopping centers, where you can browse Williams Sonoma crockery, try on Steve Madden shoes, eat at Olive Garden, take your kids to Chuck E. Cheese’s, and watch “War for the Planet of the Apes” on the big screen.

The revolution in shopping ­options has become so ingrained that many Mexicans recall with haziness the pre-NAFTA days of limited brand choices, domestic knockoffs and black-market scrounging. In such cultural ways, the NAFTA years have brought Mexico and the United States far closer together, a cross-border blending of behaviors that even a clampdown on trade is unlikely to undo. ...

On Sunday, President Trump once again blasted NAFTA, tweeting that it was the “worst trade deal ever made.” He blames the treaty for the $60 billion annual U.S. trade deficit with its southern neighbor and a loss of industrial jobs. But in Mexico, NAFTA represents something more profound. In conversations here, free trade is often a stand-in for what kind of relationship Mexico wants with the United States, and what type of country Mexico wants to be.

“NAFTA broke the barriers that limited our society from going out into the world,” said Sergio Aguayo, a prominent political commentator and academic at the College of Mexico. “In a spontaneous way, it began to hybridize cultures, from Mexico to the United States and from the United States to Mexico.”
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Re: Trump's Trade Follicy

#72

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Reuters
If Trump pulls trigger on NAFTA withdrawal, Mexico will walk away

(Reuters) - Foreign Minister Luis Videgaray said on Wednesday that Mexico will leave the negotiating table if U.S. President Donald Trump goes ahead with a threat to start the process of withdrawing from the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).

On Monday, Trump said he would probably need to terminate NAFTA to get what he considers a fair trade deal with economic partners Mexico and Canada, and revisited his campaign promise that Mexico would pay for a border wall.

Asked in Washington if Mexico would continue negotiating if Trump pulled the trigger on the six-month process of withdrawing from the trade deal, Videgaray responded with an emphatic “No.”

Videgaray said he, U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and U.S. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross agreed on Wednesday to continue with a “serious” renegotiation process. At around the same time, during a speech at a Missouri factory, Trump repeated his threat to shred the deal.

Videgaray and Economy Minister Ildefonso Guajardo traveled to Washington following Trump’s near daily threats in the build up to the second round of NAFTA talks, due to be held in Mexico Sept. 1-5
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Re: Trump's Trade Follicy

#73

Post by Suranis »

Does the orange have the authority to start the withdrawal on his own, or does he need an act of Congress to do it?
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Re: Trump's Trade Follicy

#74

Post by Sam the Centipede »

Suranis wrote:Does the orange have the authority to start the withdrawal on his own, or does he need an act of Congress to do it?
:fingerwag: Donald and Melania's sex life, especially their acts of congress, should remain a private affair between them.

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Re: Trump's Trade Follicy

#75

Post by Mikedunford »

Suranis wrote:Does the orange have the authority to start the withdrawal on his own, or does he need an act of Congress to do it?
Difficult question. Probably he can start withdrawal on his own, but only probably.
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