Stuxnet: A new age of warfare?

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MsDaisy
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Stuxnet: A new age of warfare?

Postby MsDaisy » Mon Jun 20, 2011 1:09 pm

This is potentially pretty scary stuff. First I’ve heard of this one. Anyone else heard of this?[vimeo]http://www.vimeo.com/25118844[/vimeo][/break1]rawstory.com/rawreplay/2011/06/stuxnet-virus-the-worlds-first-open-source-weapon/]http://www.rawstory.com/rawreplay/2011/ ... ce-weapon/

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ducktape
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Stuxnet: A new age of warfare?

Postby ducktape » Mon Jun 20, 2011 1:31 pm

Yes!





[/break1]com/search/#stuxnet]http://arstechnica.com/search/#stuxnet





Stay informed -- Ars Technica is one of the best all-around sources (without getting too geeky) of what's happening in the world of technology and how it will affect you. It's on my "must read before rising" list (along with TFB, of course).


[/break1]com/]http://arstechnica.com/

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verbalobe
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Stuxnet: A new age of warfare?

Postby verbalobe » Mon Jun 20, 2011 2:27 pm

I almost went to work in an internal division, nicknamed STUX, of the company I work for. It stands for Server Tools User Experience.





:shock:





I don't think they're responsible, though.





[edit]Missing word :oops:[/edit]

A Legal Lohengrin
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Stuxnet: A new age of warfare?

Postby A Legal Lohengrin » Mon Jun 20, 2011 8:18 pm

I almost went to work in an internal division, nicknamed STUX, of the company I work for. It stands for Server Tools User Experience. :shock: I don't they're responsible, though.

Stuxnet may be the first military-grade malware. It was packed with zero-day exploits and tricks never before seen. If its target was Iranian nuclear facilities, a likely culprit is the IDF or Mossad. If it's not them, we're the next most likely culprit.Computer security professionals use the term "zero-day exploit" to refer to security holes that have just become known that day, and nobody except, perhaps, the exploiter has yet thought of counter-measures. Even a single such exploit can make a formidable worm. Stuxnet had four.

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TollandRCR
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Stuxnet: A new age of warfare?

Postby TollandRCR » Tue May 29, 2012 9:51 pm

The "Flame" virus may be even more malevolent than Stuxnet. It appears that only those who wrote the code know all that it can do, but among the things that have been mentioned is record conversations around computers with mics and capture images on the screen.Globe and Mail May 29, 2012 [link]Flame virus set to spread like wildfire,http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/technology/tech-news/flame-virus-set-to-spread-like-wildfire/article2447114/?utm_medium=Feeds%3A%20RSS%2FAtom&utm_source=Home&utm_content=2447114[/link]

It is perhaps the most sophisticated piece of malicious software ever designed – a digital surveillance device so complex it ran on sensitive government computer networks for years, undetected.And now, a tool that was almost certainly developed for state-sanctioned cyberwarfare is out in the open, soon to make its way into the hands of everyone from computer virus researchers to criminal gangs.

There is much speculation about which country's military produced this virus and what it was being used for. The most common answer is "U.S., against Iran."It is said that none of the extant anti-virus software packages can detect the malicious components of the modular Flame virus.

John Thomas8
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Stuxnet: A new age of warfare?

Postby John Thomas8 » Tue May 29, 2012 10:15 pm

It's not likely you're going to get a signature for it, either.


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ducktape
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Stuxnet: A new age of warfare?

Postby ducktape » Tue May 29, 2012 11:13 pm

It is said that none of the extant anti-virus software packages can detect the malicious components of the modular Flame virus.

And here's something funny. In the last hour, I got an email from Symantec ...

Flamer has managed to infect a large number of computers worldwide. Are you protected?Norton has been tracking and monitoring the recent online spread of Flamer and we wanted to inform you that without a current Internet security product subscription, your PC may be open to infection.If you have an up-to-date Norton security software product then you are protected against this threat.Sincerely,The Norton Team

And well, yes, I do have an up-to-date Norton security software product. But with this email, do I have grounds for action if I turned out to be infected? I wonder if this bald statement that "you are protected" is such a fine idea ...

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TollandRCR
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Stuxnet: A new age of warfare?

Postby TollandRCR » Wed Jan 16, 2013 7:56 pm

ArsTechnica Jan. 14, 2013 [link]Massive espionage malware targeting governments undetected for 5 years -- "Red October" command-and-control setup more sophisticated than that of Flame,http://arstechnica.com/security/2013/01/red-october-computer-espionage-network-may-have-stolen-terabytes-of-data/[/link].

Researchers have uncovered an ongoing, large-scale computer espionage network that's targeting hundreds of diplomatic, governmental, and scientific organizations in at least 39 countries, including the Russian Federation, Iran, and the United States.Operation Red October, as researchers from antivirus provider Kaspersky Lab have dubbed the highly coordinated campaign, has been active since 2007, raising the possibility it has already siphoned up hundreds of terabytes of sensitive information. It uses more than 1,000 distinct modules that have never been seen before to customize attack profiles for each victim. Among other things, components target individual PCs, networking equipment from Cisco Systems, and smartphones from Apple, Microsoft, and Nokia. The attack also features a network of command-and-control servers with a complexity that rivals that used by the Flame espionage malware that targeted Iran."This is a pretty glaring example of a multiyear cyber espionage campaign," Kaspersky Lab expert Kurt Baumgartner told Ars. "We haven't seen these sorts of modules being distributed, so the customized approach to attacking individual victims is something we haven't seen before at this level."The main purpose of the campaign is to gather classified information and geopolitical intelligence. Among the data collected are files from cryptographic systems such as the Acid Cryptofiler, with the collected information used in later attacks. Stolen credentials, for instance, were compiled and used later when the attackers needed to guess secret phrases in other locations.

The article includes a world map with countries believed to be victims marked in red. Although suspicion is focusing on China, I think that is a mistake. Greenland is also not a victim.I assume this article is about something real.

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TollandRCR
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Stuxnet: A new age of warfare?

Postby TollandRCR » Sat Jan 19, 2013 3:53 pm

Ars Technica Jan. 18, 2013 [link]Red October espionage platform unplugged hours after its discovery: Command servers and domains that targeted governments around the world go dark,http://arstechnica.com/security/2013/01/red-october-espionage-platform-unplugged-hours-after-its-discovery/[/link].Kaspersky Labs may have been the only Internet security software firm to identify this "espionage platform" and is [link]the first to announce its disappearance,https://threatpost.com/en_us/blogs/red-october-attackers-shutting-down-cc-infrastructure-011813[/link]. Whether the platform actually existed remains a question for me.


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