Kenya in 1961

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Sequoia32
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Kenya in 1961

#26

Post by Sequoia32 » Tue Apr 19, 2011 12:53 pm

SMALLPOX FACT SHEET


Smallpox Vaccination Information for Women Who Are Pregnant or Breastfeeding





Should pregnant women receive the smallpox vaccine?


No. Women who are pregnant or planning to become pregnant within 4 weeks after vaccination should NOT get the smallpox vaccine. In addition, anyone who has a close contact who is pregnant should not get the vaccine (close contacts include anyone living in your household and anyone you have close, physical contact with such as a sex partner or someone you share a bed with). The smallpox vaccine is a live viral vaccine that is made from a virus called vaccinia. Live virus vaccines are generally not recommended during pregnancy. Pregnant women should not get the smallpox vaccine unless they have been in contact with someone with smallpox disease. The vaccine can cause a very rare but serious complication in the fetus called fetal vaccinia (less than 50 cases of fetal vaccinia have ever occurred). However, most babies born after smallpox vaccine exposure will be fine.





If a woman is vaccinated she should prevent pregnancy for a month. She should wait until the vaccination site has completely healed and the scab has fallen off before trying to become pregnant after vaccination. Until that time, effective measures should be taken to prevent pregnancy, such as birth control pills, injections, implants, IUDs, or abstinence. Other methods of birth control, such as condoms, diaphragms, spermicide, and natural family planning are less effective.Yellow fever vaccine is not recommended for preggies either. They can get a waiver of the requirement.





Tom Mboya and other leaders in the region were advocating an East African merged state consisting of Kenya, Uganda, Tanganyika, and Zanzibar (all British Territories sharing services through the British High Commission), as well as Nyasaland and Northern Rhodesia and some non-British territories. He was advocating its formation in advance of each territory receiving independence. [Note -- there doesn’t seem to have been a “Kenyan identity” at the time as Kenya was a British Colony in a group of British Colonies.]Aha. Explains why Obama Sr. was an African, not a Kenyan.


So far every case of Ebola in this country got it by helping people. So relax, Republicans, you're in the clear. - Tina Dupuy

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Princess foofypants
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Kenya in 1961

#27

Post by Princess foofypants » Tue Apr 19, 2011 2:54 pm

Tom Mboya and other leaders in the region were advocating an East African merged state consisting of Kenya, Uganda, Tanganyika, and Zanzibar (all British Territories sharing services through the British High Commission), as well as Nyasaland and Northern Rhodesia and some non-British territories. He was advocating its formation in advance of each territory receiving independence. [Note -- there doesn’t seem to have been a “Kenyan identity” at the time as Kenya was a British Colony in a group of British Colonies.Aha. Explains why Obama Sr. was an African, not a Kenyan.Yeah. Kenya was still much more tribal than national. I tried to explain that to the birthers, that Obama was a Luo, a member of the Nilotes group and Mombassa was virtually all Bantu but that never seemed to sink in with them.



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esseff44
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Kenya in 1961

#28

Post by esseff44 » Tue Apr 19, 2011 4:22 pm

Tom Mboya and other leaders in the region were advocating an East African merged state consisting of Kenya, Uganda, Tanganyika, and Zanzibar (all British Territories sharing services through the British High Commission), as well as Nyasaland and Northern Rhodesia and some non-British territories. He was advocating its formation in advance of each territory receiving independence. [Note -- there doesn’t seem to have been a “Kenyan identity” at the time as Kenya was a British Colony in a group of British Colonies.Aha. Explains why Obama Sr. was an African, not a Kenyan.Yeah. Kenya was still much more tribal than national. I tried to explain that to the birthers, that Obama was a Luo, a member of the Nilotes group and Mombassa was virtually all Bantu but that never seemed to sink in with them.From what I read about British colonial history in East Africa, Kenya was not an identity and the British took the name from the lake as a name for their protectorate and later crown colony. Individuals would have identified themselves by tribe as was their custom.I saw an article yesterday that gave an ethnic breakdown of Mombasa in 1921. IIRC, it gave the pop. at about 31,000 of which 20,000 were Indians, 10,000 were Arabs and the rest were Europeans. It did not list any Africans at all which not really a surprise because of its history as a trading post dominated by Arabs. Indians were brought in to as labor to build the railroad to the highlands.[/break1]britishempire.co.uk/maproom/kenya.htm]http://www.britishempire.co.uk/maproom/kenya.htm Some more maps and an interesting article.



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Whatever4
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Kenya in 1961

#29

Post by Whatever4 » Thu Apr 28, 2011 3:26 pm

Seems like the afterbirfers are settling into a couple of new rat holes: Illustrator forgery, transcripts, resurrections of the travel ban, Indonesia, and African not a race. For ammunition against the last, here's a page scan from Africa A-Z. I've circled where Kane uses words for race (non-country-based descriptors). They are: African, European, Asian. Not a Negro or Caucasian in the bunch. Plus their Asian is Pakistan or Indian. [/break1]scribd.com/doc/54152116/AFRICA-A-Z] to Jack Ryan for his help.


"[Moderate] doesn't mean you don't have views. It just means your views aren't predictable ideologically one way or the other, and you're trying to follow the facts where they lead and reach your own conclusions."
-- Sen. King (R-ME)

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verbalobe
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Kenya in 1961

#30

Post by verbalobe » Sun Mar 11, 2012 10:39 am

I ran across this passage in Dreams, about how Anne and Barry prepared for their move to Indonesia (Lolo had gone on ahead). This was a move, of course, and not just a trip to go have a baby in squalor, but it's still instructive as to what travel was like in about 1967. It wasn't any easier to Kenya than to Indonesia, nor any easier in 1961.





...my mother and I spent months in preparation—passports, visas, plane tickets, hotel reservations, an endless series of shots...





...Meanwhile, Toot called the State Department to find out if the country was stable. Whoever she spoke to there informed her that the situation was under control. Still, she insisted that we pack several trunks full of foodstuffs: Tang, powdered milk, cans of sardines. “You never know what these people will eat,” she said...





...Finally, we boarded a Pan Am jet for our flight around the globe. I wore a long-sleeved white shirt and a gray clip-on tie, and the stewardesses plied me with puzzles and extra peanuts and a set of metal pilot’s wings that I wore over my breast pocket. On a three-day stopover in Japan, we walked through bone-chilling rains to see the great bronze Buddha at Kamakura and ate green tea ice cream on a ferry that passed through high mountain lakes. In the evenings my mother studied flash cards.



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Sequoia32
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Kenya in 1961

#31

Post by Sequoia32 » Sun Mar 11, 2012 12:50 pm

Off Topic
(Lolo had gone on ahead).That's an understatement.Lolo's cousin to Ann:“The circumstances of Lolo’s return. He hadn’t planned on coming back from Hawaii so early, you know. During the purge, all students studying abroad had been summoned without explanation, their passports revoked. When Lolo stepped off the plane, he had no idea of what might happen next. We couldn’t see him; the army officials took him away and questioned him. They told him that he had just been conscripted and would be going to the jungles of New Guinea for a year. And he was one of the lucky ones. Students studying in Eastern Bloc countries did much worse. Many of them are still in jail. Or vanished.President Obama doesn't dwell on the dangers in Indonesia then, but he says enough to make it very reasonable for Lolo to have registered him in school as a Muslim. And using the family surname logical and extremely common.


So far every case of Ebola in this country got it by helping people. So relax, Republicans, you're in the clear. - Tina Dupuy

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Princess foofypants
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Kenya in 1961

#32

Post by Princess foofypants » Sun Mar 11, 2012 1:20 pm

Not to mention the immunizations you had to have to go to Africa. So many that when we went in the early 70s we had to go 4 different times since you can't be injected with everything at once. Some of these immunizations they won't even give to pregnant women. Hmmm



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Chilidog
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Kenya in 1961

#33

Post by Chilidog » Sun Mar 11, 2012 4:20 pm

Some of these immunizations they won't even give to pregnant women. Hmmmor to newborns.Some of these were live virus vaccines.



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esseff44
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Kenya in 1961

#34

Post by esseff44 » Sun Mar 11, 2012 5:37 pm

Some of these immunizations they won't even give to pregnant women. Hmmmor to newborns.Some of these were live virus vaccines.They are still live viral vaccines and are still contraindicated for pregnant women and infants.[/break1]wikipedia.org/wiki/Yellow_fever_vaccine]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yellow_fever_vaccine[/break1]wikipedia.org/wiki/Plague_vaccine]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plague_vaccine



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TollandRCR
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Kenya in 1961

#35

Post by TollandRCR » Sun Mar 11, 2012 6:08 pm

At one time the yellow fever vaccine could be given only at specially licensed centers, which happened to include the University Medical Center in Ann Arbor. I have never received the plague vaccine, and the Center refused to give the cholera vaccine on the grounds that (a) it did not work and (b) it made you sick.


“The truth is, we know so little about life, we don’t really know what the good news is and what the bad news is.” Kurt Vonnegut

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