Kenya in 1961

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Whatever4
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Kenya in 1961

#1

Post by Whatever4 » Wed Apr 13, 2011 5:20 pm

I now have a copy of “Africa A to Z” by [link]Robert S. Kane,http://www.nytimes.com/1997/11/19/nyreg ... eries.html[/link] -- the famous first comprehensive travel book on every country in Africa, copyright 1961. It's a [link]well-respected resource,http://tinyurl.com/3l43kuye[/link] quite packed with good information by an expert on the subject. One of my favorite quotes:





The European colonists who found it expedient to dub [Africa] the Dark Continent" must certainly rank amongst the most successful hucksters of all time." =)) =))[*:8p3fww95]Throughout the book, Kane refers to people how the residents of each country does. Black residents of Kenya are “Africans,” white residents are “Europeans.” Residents of Zanzibar are “Zanzibaris,” blacks from Nigeria are “Nigerians,” Blegians are in the Congo, Watusi rule Ruanda-Urundi although Bahutu are the majority. Blacks from America are “American Negros,” whites from America are “Americans.”








[*:8p3fww95]In 1961, Kenya was a British Crown Colony-Protectorate, Capital Nairobi, population 6.261 million, area 224,960 square miles. Zanzibar was a British-protected Sultanate, Capital Zanzibar, population 300K, area 1020 square miles. Neither is marked as a “Member of the British Commonwealth.”








[*:8p3fww95]Nairobi in 1961 was the commercial, industrial, administrative, and tourist center of British East Africa. It was the largest city in East African between Cairo and Johannesburg. Population was 6 million Africans, 50K Europeans, and 170K Asians (mostly Indians). Currency was the East African Shilling, both in Kenya and Zanzibar.








[*:8p3fww95] Other cities mentioned:


[*:8p3fww95]Mombasa is listed as a city in the Kenya chapter and not in the Zanzibar chapter.


[*:8p3fww95]Nakuru (150 miles from Nyang'oma Kogelo, on the road to Nairobi.)


[*:8p3fww95]Malindi (608 miles from Nyang'oma Kogelo, 73 miles from Mombasa)


[*:8p3fww95]Gedi, an ancient site near Malindi.


[*:8p3fww95]Tom Mboya and other leaders in the region were advocating an East African merged state consisting of Kenya, Uganda, Tanganyika, and Zanzibar (all British Territories sharing services through the British High Commission), as well as Nyasaland and Northern Rhodesia and some non-British territories. He was advocating its formation in advance of each territory receiving independence. [Note -- there doesn’t seem to have been a “Kenyan identity” at the time as Kenya was a British Colony in a group of British Colonies.]








[*:8p3fww95]The “rigid color bar” was officially lifted sometime between 1958 and 1961 (Kane doesn’t say when), but it was still enforced in many areas.








[*:8p3fww95]According to Kane, Kenya was under a state of emergency until July 1958 from the Mau Mau terrors that began in 1952. (Other sources have different dates.) Most white settlers were “are adamant in their dislike of the Africans, whom they believe to be incapable of assuming responsibility, suitable for only manual labor and domestic service, and ‘constitutionally inferior’ -- all evidence to the contrary notwithstanding.” [/list]
Visa Requirements for Kenya were similar for most African nations. Before applying, an applicant needed:


[*:8p3fww95]Valid Passport. In 1961, that passport was good for 3 years, renewable once for 2 years. Cost was $10 for the initial passport, $5 for the renewal. Turnaround time was 2 weeks.


[*:8p3fww95]Health Certificate showing valid inoculations for smallpox and yellow fever


[*:8p3fww95]Smallpox must be more than 8 days old and less than 3 years old


[*:8p3fww95]Yellow fever injection must be not less than 10 days and not more than 6 years old. MUST be obtained from US Public Health Service clinics, cannot be from private physicians.


[*:8p3fww95]Also advisable to have typhoid, para-typhoid, typhus, cholera, and tetanus innoculations[*:8p3fww95]Transportation ticket showing a departure date


[*:8p3fww95]Passport photos


[*:8p3fww95]Certificate of Good Conduct from the local police department.


[*:8p3fww95]Visa application through the consulates located in major cities. For Kenya, that would be the British Consulate.[/list]So -- discuss.


"[Moderate] doesn't mean you don't have views. It just means your views aren't predictable ideologically one way or the other, and you're trying to follow the facts where they lead and reach your own conclusions."
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Kenya in 1961

#2

Post by poutine » Wed Apr 13, 2011 5:54 pm

Here's my understanding so far, then. Just throwing this out for discussion. Zanzibar may have possessed Mombasa at some point in time, but the Sultan of Zanzibar "leased" territory including Mombasa to the British prior to 1961. The British administered it, from everything I'm seeing so far, as a part of the Colony and Protectorate of Kenya. Therefore:[*:ldj7fvuw]A birth certificate issued in 1961 for a Mombasa baby born in 1961 would have been issued by the Colony and Protectorate of Kenya.[*:ldj7fvuw]A birth certificate issued after 1963 for a Mombasa baby born in 1961 would have been issued by the Republic of Kenya.



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Kenya in 1961

#3

Post by Welsh Dragon » Wed Apr 13, 2011 5:58 pm

In 1961, Kenya was a British Crown Colony-ProtectorateNot quite true - The Colony and Protectorate were seperate legal entities although for convenience they were administered together from Nairobi. The difference arose because of the relationship with Zanzibar. The Protectorate consisted of a coastal strip, including Mombasa, which had been granted to British by the Sultan of Zanzibar without ceding sovereignty. Zanzibar itself became a British Protectorate and IIRC the Sultan sent into exile in another British Territory (Aden I think) creating a rather untidy legal situation.This would also be why:1.Mombasa is listed as a city in the Kenya chapter and not in the Zanzibar chapter.Currency was the East African Shilling, both in Kenya and Zanzibar.So I always believed but Dr C (who is a stamp collector) pulled me up on it in 2009 and proved there was also a Pound.Neither is marked as a “Member of the British CommonwealthThat would be correct the Commonwealth (it ceased to be the British Commonwealth in 1949) consisted of Independent nations such as "dominions" like Canada or Republics like India. Colonies & Protectorates etc were part of the British Empire.•Tom Mboya and other leaders in the region were advocating an East African merged state consisting of Kenya, Uganda, Tanganyika, and Zanzibar (all British Territories sharing services through the British High Commission), as well as Nyasaland and Northern Rhodesia and some non-British territories. He was advocating its formation in advance of each territory receiving independenceThere were several ideas along these lines through the 50s and early 60s some got further than others they basically failed because of sectional, racial and tribal tensions.



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Kenya in 1961

#4

Post by Welsh Dragon » Wed Apr 13, 2011 6:04 pm

Here's my understanding so far, then. Just throwing this out for discussion.





Zanzibar may have possessed Mombasa at some point in time, but the Sultan of Zanzibar "leased" territory including Mombasa to the British prior to 1961. The British administered it, from everything I'm seeing so far, as a part of the Colony and Protectorate of Kenya. Therefore:





[*:gociu5ui]A birth certificate issued in 1961 for a Mombasa baby born in 1961 would have been issued by the Colony and Protectorate of Kenya. - that is 100% correct.





[*:gociu5ui]A birth certificate issued after 1963 for a Mombasa baby born in 1961 would have been issued by the Republic of Kenya. - Not quite between December 16 1963 and December 16 1964 it would be "Dominion of Kenya".



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Kenya in 1961

#5

Post by poutine » Wed Apr 13, 2011 6:09 pm

Thanks, Welsh. I updated the wiki to remove my erroneous understanding that Zanzibar would ever have been an issuing entity of certificates.[/break1]obamafringe.com/index.php?title=Main_Page#He_was_not_born_in_Mombasa.2C_Kenya]http://wiki.obamafringe.com/index.php?t ... a.2C_Kenya



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Kenya in 1961

#6

Post by Paul Pieniezny » Wed Apr 13, 2011 6:31 pm

(cross posted from the the Donald thread - I am assuming some people are writing tongue in cheek here)I hate to be called the one who spills the beans and stops the birfers from fantasizing even more, but you should know that the I, Lucas Smith, already knows what the actual status of the Protectorate of Kenya was. I do not know whether he was ever tempted by the Zanzibar birth certificate posted on PJ (by me, in the hope some birfer would fake a Zanzibar birth certificate for Obama on that model), but I do know he looked into the Zanzibar matter and found what he had to know. By that time of course, he had already made up the fraudulent birth certificate from Mombasa (I keep typing Ombessa - Obama Odessa - whenever Orly is going to be in the sentence) which he gave Orly.The Sultan's reign over Coast Province (re-named to Coast Region for a short period after independence, and later returned within reduced borders to the same name) was purely nominal. The British Crown leased it from him in perpetuity and treated both Kenyas as one country. When Kenya's independence was discussed, the future of Mombasa for a short time led to a debate between London and the locals. London felt it owed a treaty duty to return Mombasa to the Sultan. Kenyatta claimed Mombasa as part of an ancient, historical Kenya - and the white settlers in Kenya Colony thought that including Mombasa with its Arabs and other Asians in the new Kenya would indirectly help whites who wanted to stay. Afraid that Kenyatta would take the Protectorate by force after independence, and busy convincing African leaders to make a gentlemen's agreement about keeping the colonial frontiers intact after independence, the British found a way to save face: the nominal rule of the Sultan over Coast Province/Protectorate of Kenya ended on the very same day that Kenya became independent. That way neither the British Empire nor Kenyatta had to violate an (unwritten) international law.The Protectorate had not always been under British control. Using the excuse that as a part of Zanzibar, the coast was not covered by agreements on European possessions in Africa, Germany had tried to infiltrate in the area from the 1880s. The Sultan of Zanzibar, like many African leaders preferring any rule over British rule, had started playing off the Germans against the British and granted Germany the Protectorate over a small Northern part of African Zanzibar: Witu Land. This raised the spectre of British possessions in Eastern Africa being cut off from the sea, so Britain acted and proposed to Bismarck the exchange of the island of Heligoland and the Caprivi Strip in return for Witu Land and the promise NOT to support Zanzibar in its opposition to British rule. Somehow, the deal was called the Heligoland-Zanzibar Treaty in Germany, leading nationalists who had long been part of the conservative political majority, to protest this "exchange of a pair of trousers for a button" and remove themselves from the normal corridors of political power.The treaty changed Germany's political soul in two ways:1) Without the treaty, Hugenberg would not have become an important factor in German politics. It was Hugenberg who provided the votes Hitler needed to achieve absolute power. Without Germany "abandoning" Zanzibar, no Hitler?2) When the ceremony for the first raising of the German flag on Heligoland drew near, someone remembered that it was while in exile on the island that Von Fallersleben had written the text of "Deutschland Ueber Alles". The Emperor, who was known to hate the song because of its association with the liberal revolutionaries who had campaigned for German unity including Austria during most of the 19th century, was now pressured to accept the playing of the "left-wing" hymn to celebrate the conciliation of part of the right (minus Hugenberg) with the left. He agreed, and the playing of that song that day became instrumental in turning it into Germany's national hymn before it legally became so. [/break1]wikipedia.org/wiki/Heligoland%E2%80%93Zanzibar_Treaty]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heligoland ... bar_Treaty(actually, most of this is already buried here somewhere)



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Kenya in 1961

#7

Post by Lola_Getz » Thu Apr 14, 2011 7:52 am

So -- discuss.I'm thinking that no doctor would have vaccinated a heavily pregnant teenager against smallpox or yellow fever, let alone typhoid, para-typhoid, typhus, cholera or tetanus, so there goes the health certificate Stanley Ann Dunham Obama would have needed for a Kenyan travel visa.



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#8

Post by Reality Check » Thu Apr 14, 2011 8:47 am

Thanks Paul for the research. This is why I love history. You start with the Smith POSFKBC and end up at Hitler!





It would be nice to find a copy of some government documents produced in Mombasa during this period to see how they are titled. I mean real documents of course. ;)


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Kenya in 1961

#9

Post by Welsh Dragon » Thu Apr 14, 2011 9:17 am

To correct my earlier post - it seems that after independence in 1963 and before Kenya procalimed itself a republic in Dec 1964 birth certificates were head "Government of Kenya". WND published this example in 2009[/break1]wnd.com/images/misc/image.KenyaBC1two.jpg]http://www.wnd.com/images/misc/image.KenyaBC1two.jpg[/break1]wnd.com/images/misc/image.KenyaBC2two.jpg]http://www.wnd.com/images/misc/image.KenyaBC2two.jpg(It's split over two images)Although WND describit as "1961 era" the handwritten number and the reference to "Kenya Citizen" tie it to 1964. For what it's worth I also suspect it's a "file copy" and long ago I stumpled on the information that Kenya moved to such a system in 1963 - prior to that biths were handwritten in bound ledgers and the certificate was a certificate of what was in the ledger.



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Kenya in 1961

#10

Post by Welsh Dragon » Thu Apr 14, 2011 9:44 am




It would be nice to find a copy of some government documents produced in Mombasa during this period to see how they are titled. I mean real documents of course. ;)Now here's a dilemma that I'd like the herd's opinion on.





Back in 2009 what appears to be an image of a Birth Certificate issued in Mombasa in 1958 was posted on a website. It's quite difficult to find even when you know it's there (I lost my link once and it took me hours recover it) and I've never seen any birfer or obot mention it (except me). I cannot vouch for its provenance but its layout is consistent with British and Colonial birth certificates of the period and with the WND early Kenyan Independence certificate I linked to earlier.





I certainly believe it's genuine but I've been reluctant to draw attention to it because it might prove a useful template for forgers and the info on it was un redacted. (I thought very unwise that it was published in the first place)





I believe it's still on the net but I have a copy of the image anyway.





So to link or not to link? Publish a redacted version or not? Home page project or not?



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Kenya in 1961

#11

Post by Suranis » Thu Apr 14, 2011 9:58 am

I'd say offhand that if you have doubts about putting it up then don't, or at least redact the info yourself.


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#12

Post by Paul Pieniezny » Thu Apr 14, 2011 11:32 am







It would be nice to find a copy of some government documents produced in Mombasa during this period to see how they are titled. I mean real documents of course. ;)Now here's a dilemma that I'd like the herd's opinion on.





Back in 2009 what appears to be an image of a Birth Certificate issued in Mombasa in 1958 was posted on a website. It's quite difficult to find even when you know it's there (I lost my link once and it took me hours recover it) and I've never seen any birfer or obot mention it (except me). I cannot vouch for its provenance but its layout is consistent with British and Colonial birth certificates of the period and with the WND early Kenyan Independence certificate I linked to earlier.





I certainly believe it's genuine but I've been reluctant to draw attention to it because it might prove a useful template for forgers and the info on it was un redacted. (I thought very unwise that it was published in the first place)





I believe it's still on the net but I have a copy of the image anyway.





So to link or not to link? Publish a redacted version or not? Home page project or not?

Well, when the Lucas Smith (POS)BC hit the intertubes, shortly after the Bomford one (I think that was the sequence), a Kenyan newspaper carried an article about all those fake BCs (there had been an earlier, rather crude one with a watermark saying "this is a fake" in Dutch or Afrikaans, I forgot already) . They had a government spokesman explaining a mongst other things what would be on a Mombasa BC from 1961 (the same title would have been on all BCs from Kenya in 1961). And threatening to prosecute any forger to the full extent of the law, whatever his or her motives were. Some birfers should be very careful about visiting Kenya. (He Lucas, of course that does not apply to you, so go and get that visa to prove you have been in Kenya, but go personally, of course :twisted: )





Comparing the title with the one on your document would be interesting. Though it would not prove much, since 1958 is not 1961 and things were moving rapidly then.





Redacting the names is bothersome. It should be done, I suppose, but there is a claim that until 1962 African children were not even registered, Europeans and Americans were and for the many Asians in Mombasa, it depended on the wealth and/or status of the parents. So, if the name is not indicative of a "White" person, redacting it may obfuscate interesting information.





It is a problem. I would go for redacting anyway.



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Kenya in 1961

#13

Post by Princess foofypants » Thu Apr 14, 2011 6:13 pm

So -- discuss.I'm thinking that no doctor would have vaccinated a heavily pregnant teenager against smallpox or yellow fever, let alone typhoid, para-typhoid, typhus, cholera or tetanus, so there goes the health certificate Stanley Ann Dunham Obama would have needed for a Kenyan travel visa.I don't know about the pregnant part, but the first time we moved to Africa (in 1968), we had to get our shots over a fairly lengthy period of time since you don't just go in and get shot up with several things at once. But yes, the pregnancy thing likely would be an issue (along with the passport thing and the totally crazy to go there thing)



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Kenya in 1961

#14

Post by Somerset » Thu Apr 14, 2011 6:52 pm







It would be nice to find a copy of some government documents produced in Mombasa during this period to see how they are titled. I mean real documents of course. ;)Now here's a dilemma that I'd like the herd's opinion on.





At this point I don't think yet another fake BC will gain much traction, and having an exemplar of a real document from that place and time on our home page helps establish our credibility when debunking the fakes. I don't think publicly sharing the link is a good idea.




Sekrit Stuffs!
If you really want to be clever, insert some sort of "error" (i.e., photoshop out some little bit of text) into the document while you're redacting it. That way you'll have conclusive proof if the version here is used to create a forgery



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#15

Post by esseff44 » Mon Apr 18, 2011 5:43 am

Here's my understanding so far, then. Just throwing this out for discussion. Zanzibar may have possessed Mombasa at some point in time, but the Sultan of Zanzibar "leased" territory including Mombasa to the British prior to 1961. The British administered it, from everything I'm seeing so far, as a part of the Colony and Protectorate of Kenya. Therefore:[*:3puk6unk]A birth certificate issued in 1961 for a Mombasa baby born in 1961 would have been issued by the Colony and Protectorate of Kenya.[*:3puk6unk]A birth certificate issued after 1963 for a Mombasa baby born in 1961 would have been issued by the Republic of Kenya.Here's a link to a time line that might help keep it straight:[/break1]wikipedia.org/wiki/Political_history_of_Eastern_Africa]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Political_ ... ern_AfricaMombasa was a fortress city on the trade routes along the coast. It traded hands many times as you can see. The Sultanates expanded and receded as did the tribal kingdoms in the interior. I was distressed to see so many posts attempting to debunk the Mombasa BC stories by claiming Mombasa was not a part of Kenya and was a part of Zanzibar. Wikipedia had it wrong and many others picked it up without checking. I contacted a few but they never corrected. Zanzibar itself was just one island off the coast. The Sultan of Zanzibar at one time ruled the coast all the way up to Oman. The Sultanate became a British Protectorate and so Mombasa was included as a part of it. The British administered Mombasa jointly with the Kenya Colony and it was called the Coastal Colony. In 1963, theses protectorates became independent from Britain with Mombasa staying with Kenya while Zanzibar (and Pemba) was joined with Tanganyika to become the United Republic of Tanzania. Does that make sense? It's confusing but it does not help to debunk a story with another story that is not quite on the mark.



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#16

Post by Paul Pieniezny » Mon Apr 18, 2011 12:55 pm

In 1963, theses protectorates became independent from Britain with Mombasa staying with Kenya while Zanzibar (and Pemba) was joined with Tanganyika to become the United Republic of Tanzania. It is a bit more complicated. Zanzibar became independent on its own on December 10 th (like Kenya) under the rule of the Sultan, with an electoral system that was gerrymandered to give Arabs a majority of seats. During the last "free" elections under British rule, the Afro-Shirazi Party (Shirazis are Swahili speaking muslims who claim to be of Iranian descent) aligned itself with let-wing Socialist Ummah Party and got 54% of the vote, but still only 13 seats out of 31. The Arabs formed a coalition with the Pemba party. Less than one month after independence, a revolution broke out which destroyed the Arab domination. Zanzibar and Tanganyika became one country in April 1964 only.



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#17

Post by esseff44 » Mon Apr 18, 2011 5:36 pm

In 1963, theses protectorates became independent from Britain with Mombasa staying with Kenya while Zanzibar (and Pemba) was joined with Tanganyika to become the United Republic of Tanzania. It is a bit more complicated. Zanzibar became independent on its own on December 10 th (like Kenya) under the rule of the Sultan, with an electoral system that was gerrymandered to give Arabs a majority of seats. During the last "free" elections under British rule, the Afro-Shirazi Party (Shirazis are Swahili speaking muslims who claim to be of Iranian descent) aligned itself with let-wing Socialist Ummah Party and got 54% of the vote, but still only 13 seats out of 31. The Arabs formed a coalition with the Pemba party. Less than one month after independence, a revolution broke out which destroyed the Arab domination. Zanzibar and Tanganyika became one country in April 1964 only.Thanks for expanding on Zanzibar. The point I was trying to make was that the born-in Mombasa narrative pushed by birthers is often countered with a claim that Mombasa was not a part of Kenya in 1961 and was in or belonged to another country (Zanzibar). The Sultan of Zanzibar may have had a vestigial claim of sovereignty but no real administrative power. So, Mombasa was a 'part' of Kenya ruled by the British as a Protectorate while the rest of Kenya was ruled as a Crown Colony until Independence in 1963. That is what would be on a birth certificate of children born there ....not Zanzibar which was itself a British Protectorate. The biggest gap in the narrative is how they got papers to bring the child back to Hawaii. [/break1]wikipedia.org/wiki/Zanzibar_Revolution]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zanzibar_Revolution The Zanzibar Revolution is interesting from another perspective. Zanzibar was the birth place of Freddie Mercury whose father worked for the British Colonial Office. They had to flee the carnage and ended up in England and the rest is history. Out this chaotic situation came one of the greatest musical talents of modern times IMHO.[/break1]wikipedia.org/wiki/Zanzibar_Revolution]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zanzibar_Revolution As you say, it's complicated. Still, what debunks the narrative is the near impossibility of ending up in Mombasa having a child at that time. Why didn't the tale inventors pick Nairobi, which would have made much more sense. Mombasa doesn't even have a US consul. I have been trying to imagine how she could have managed all that, present the baby to a consul with all the right kind of documents in order to get him back through immigration. I just cannot imagine such a trip taking place under those conditions.The Zanzibar Revolution is very important for another reason. Freddie Mercury was born in Zanzibar and his father worked for the British Colonial Office. They fled to England to escape the upheaval and carnage and the rest is history. Now there is a coincidence they could make a good story of. Obama is really Freddie Mercury's brother.



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#18

Post by poutine » Tue Apr 19, 2011 2:05 am

I made an interesting find today, while searching the archives of the New York Times through the nifty new subscription I have on my ipad. Narrowing the search to approximately 1961 on the subjects of Mombasa and Zanzibar, I found an article (PDF only, can't post the image from my ipad so I will follow up tomorrow on my desktop) specifically addressing the possession of the leased territory technically owned by the Sultanate of Zanzibar. The map, which the New York Times dated December 19, 1961 (four months after Obama's birth), very clearly depicts Mombasa as being a part of the Zanzibar protectorate, distinct from the British protectorate or colony of Kenya. And the point of the article was that the British were considering a report that had recommended that, in the future, Mombasa be transitioned to Kenya for future administrative purposes as the colony was given its independence.



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#19

Post by Welsh Dragon » Tue Apr 19, 2011 8:43 am

I'll be fascinated to see the Map and wil probably purchase the article later but for the moment my postition rests on on the legally defined boundaries of the Protectorate.:1. This Order may be cited as the KenyaColony and Protectorate (Boundaries) Order inCouncil, 1921.2. The limits of this Order are the territoriescomprised in the Colony and Protectorate ofKenya which include the following: —(1) The territories comprised in the Protectorateof Kenya are bounded on the East bythe Indian Ocean, on the North by thenorthern branch, of the Tana River, on theWest by a line following the line of coast ata distance of 10 sea miles from high-watermark, and on the South by the TanganyikaTerritory. .The Protectorate of Kenya includesKau and Kipini, the Island' of Lamu,and the Station of Kismayu with a radiuslandward of 10- sea miles,and all adjacentislands between the rivers Umba and Tana.http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/issues/ ... es/5225The Umba river is about 40 miles south of Mombasa.(Full disclosure the boundaries were altered a few years later but only in the north to settle disputed territory with the Italians)



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#20

Post by Reality Check » Tue Apr 19, 2011 9:02 am

This is from a [link]1960 National Geographic map of Africa,http://www.maps.com/map.aspx?pid=15853[/link]. I had posted a link to this in the Trump thread. It is certainly not the end all but it seems to show that Mombasa is part of the Kenya Protectorate. Has anyone considered writing the National Geographic Society for their opinion on the status of Mombasa in this time period?


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#21

Post by Welsh Dragon » Tue Apr 19, 2011 11:42 am

Thanks RC To relate this to my earlier post - the mouth of the Umba is just above Tanga where the the red boundary line between Kenya and Tanganika meets the sea. It was used as anchor point in defining the border between British East Africa and German East Africa in the 1890s and has been carried forward into modern national boundaries.



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#22

Post by poutine » Tue Apr 19, 2011 11:55 am

I'm having trouble getting the whole article imaged. If someone can tell me how to upload a PDF somewhere that I can then link to from here, let me know. In the meantime, here's a partial:I don't actually think this map or the article disagrees with anything significant that Paul and Welsh have been saying. With the benefit of being able to read all of it, I can tell you that it does confirm that the British are indeed administratively governing Mombasa, and not the Sultan of Zanzibar, as of December 19, 1961 (the date of the article). From that, it is natural to conclude that a birth certificate would have been issued by the British. But, it is interesting that this contemporaneous map still recognizes Zanzibar as the sovereign over Mombasa, notwithstanding the British administration that governs it. My personal conclusion is that it is just too difficult to tell, from the limited evidence we've seen so far, whether a birth certificate would have been issued in the name of the Kenyan colony or the Zanzibar protectorate. The best evidence would be an authentic Mombasa birth certificate from the era.



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#23

Post by poutine » Tue Apr 19, 2011 12:05 pm

Here's the whole article (with a few ads you'll need to bypass, sorry): [link]PDF,http://www.filefactory.com/file/cbdcaf1/n/zanzibar.pdf[/link]



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Welsh Dragon
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Joined: Mon Aug 10, 2009 3:29 pm

Kenya in 1961

#24

Post by Welsh Dragon » Tue Apr 19, 2011 12:29 pm

Oh it's that map! - I haven't seen that since the heady days of the 'big thread' at FR on the Bomford birth certificate in 2009. The shaded area is actually the Protectorate not just Mombasa.



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