Involuntary Conversion in Christian History

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Plutodog
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Involuntary Conversion in Christian History

#1

Post by Plutodog » Mon Nov 09, 2015 8:32 pm

I have not researched all this and I wonder if those who have that in their resident memory can tell me where it fails in fact along the way (I know there's some inflamatory editorializing about the claimed facts). Nothing like a good Fogbow debunking.

Excerpt for flavor, see the link for the rest:
Roman Empire

315 CE. Christianity becomes legal.

From now on Pagan temples are increasingly destroyed by Christian mobs. Some famous temples that are ruined include the Sanctuary of Æsculapius, the Temple of Aphrodite in Lebanon, the Heliopolis, the Temple of Serapis in Egypt, and many others. Christian priests such as Cyril of Heliopolis and Mark of Arethusa become renowned as “temple destroyers” .

Pagan priests are increasingly murdered, together with their heathen congregations.

356 CE. Pagan services are punishable by death. The Christian Emperor Theodosius even murders children caught playing with the remains of heathen statues.

Pagan philosophers are cruelly murdered. Perhaps the most revered heathen martyr is Hypatia of Alexandria, daughter of Theon the mathematician. Urged on by St Cyril of Alexandria, a mob of Christian fanatics dragged the world-famous philosopher from her chariot, stripped her naked, hauled her to the church, and there murdered her by scraping the flesh from her bones with sharp oyster shells. Her mortal remains were then burned before the screaming Christian hordes.
https://odinicriteofaustralia.wordpress ... hristians/


The only good Bundy is an Al Bundy.

qbawl
Posts: 414
Joined: Sun Aug 30, 2015 2:58 pm

Re: Involuntary Conversion in Christian History

#2

Post by qbawl » Mon Nov 09, 2015 8:45 pm

Plutodog wrote:I have not researched all this and I wonder if those who have that in their resident memory can tell me where it fails in fact along the way (I know there's some inflamatory editorializing about the claimed facts). Nothing like a good Fogbow debunking.

Excerpt for flavor, see the link for the rest:
Roman Empire

315 CE. Christianity becomes legal.

From now on Pagan temples are increasingly destroyed by Christian mobs. Some famous temples that are ruined include the Sanctuary of Æsculapius, the Temple of Aphrodite in Lebanon, the Heliopolis, the Temple of Serapis in Egypt, and many others. Christian priests such as Cyril of Heliopolis and Mark of Arethusa become renowned as “temple destroyers” .

Pagan priests are increasingly murdered, together with their heathen congregations.

356 CE. Pagan services are punishable by death. The Christian Emperor Theodosius even murders children caught playing with the remains of heathen statues.

Pagan philosophers are cruelly murdered. Perhaps the most revered heathen martyr is Hypatia of Alexandria, daughter of Theon the mathematician. Urged on by St Cyril of Alexandria, a mob of Christian fanatics dragged the world-famous philosopher from her chariot, stripped her naked, hauled her to the church, and there murdered her by scraping the flesh from her bones with sharp oyster shells. Her mortal remains were then burned before the screaming Christian hordes.
https://odinicriteofaustralia.wordpress ... hristians/
Urged on by St Cyril of Alexandria
He seems nice, for a saint anyway!



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esseff44
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Re: Involuntary Conversion in Christian History

#3

Post by esseff44 » Mon Nov 09, 2015 9:32 pm

What is described in your post and in the history of the time, there was no tolerance for any non-Christian religions nor was there tolerance for any sect of the many Christian sects except for the one favored by the Emperor. The old temples were pulled down, their holidays turned to workdays, and the official state religion was the only one allowed. It was a drastic and fast change. 'Conversion' does not seem the right word, however. It was more along the lines of cleansing society of the old Gods and superimposing the new ones of the Holy Trinity.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christian ... eodosius_I

It helps to have an enormous military force under your command if you want to enforce a ban like that. It makes the folks using the word 'tyranny- these days look very silly.....just because they are asked to pay taxes for schools and health care and such. They should come face to face with some real old-fashioned tyrants like Theodosius.

With all those constant wars, it's no wonder the population stayed as level as it did for as long as it did.

Do they include this history in the new textbooks in Texas? :silenced: :cantlook: :notlistening:



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Plutodog
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Re: Involuntary Conversion in Christian History

#4

Post by Plutodog » Tue Nov 10, 2015 3:29 am

It's not exactly a mass baptism by fire hoses, is it?

Image
Brass bands and thundering preachers welcomed believers attending the annual mass baptism at the United House of Prayer for All People in Charlotte, NC. The Charlotte Pentecostal church was one of many United House of Prayer churches holding the group baptism in October 2009. The tradition of baptism by fire hose started nearly a century ago as a way for members to periodically wash away their sins and heal physical ailments.
http://patrickschneider.photoshelter.co ... p31tSqCgQk


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esseff44
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Re: Involuntary Conversion in Christian History

#5

Post by esseff44 » Tue Nov 10, 2015 10:39 am

I am familiar with the House of Prayer for All People. I attend their services whenever my neighbor invites me, If you like New Orleans style brass bands and having a chance to zone out to the hypnotic trance-inducing music and dancing, it's the place to go. There are people standing by to make sure nothing bad happens if the Holy Spirit takes hold and gives a participant the shakes and tremors. When I was growing up, I would hear them called Holy Rollers because that is what some of them do.....fall down shaking and roll around. That is also how the Shakers and Quakers got their names.

The emphasis of their services is on praise and thankfulness. The Young Preacher is also the keyboardist and he is very good at both. The last time I saw him, his wrist was bandaged up. I asked him if it was repetitive motion related. He said it was but that at least it wasn't from getting rusty. :-D

You don't have to be a Christian to go and take part in their praise service. It's very low key and no pressure. The people are warm and welcoming. I always come away feeling lighter, healthier and in better spirits. It is just what the name says: The House of Prayer for All People.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Ho ... All_People

For this group, the church is not the building, but the group that has gathered for prayer and praise and fellowship. That the membership is still as small as it is after a hundred years indicates that they are not big on conversion of any kind. They did however lead in integrating worship services in the South long before the Civil Rights Movement and also was strongly ecumenical.



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