Vietnam War

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RTH10260
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Vietnam War

#1

Post by RTH10260 » Thu Nov 12, 2015 4:33 pm

cause it turned up at LL:
Vietnam War Hearing: John Kerry Testimony - Vietnam Veterans Against the War (1971)
[bbvideo=560,315][/bbvideo]



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Addie
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Re: Vietnam War

#2

Post by Addie » Thu Nov 12, 2015 5:08 pm

Thanks, RTH. I remember this well. My first husband was VVAW.


¡Sterngard! come home.

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esseff44
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Re: Vietnam War

#3

Post by esseff44 » Thu Nov 12, 2015 5:46 pm

Young John Kerry testifying before Congress after serving as commander of a swiftboat patrol on the Mekong down in the delta....units with one of the highest fatality rates, IIRC.

It was this testimony and his medals that were targets of Corsi and the other propagandists hired to smear and discredit the military service of John Kerry when he was a candidate for president. Their activities became known as 'swiftboating.'

That was when I got into debunking as a preoccupation and morphed into Obotism.

Corsi is still, to me, the vilest of the most vile.



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RTH10260
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Re: Vietnam War

#4

Post by RTH10260 » Tue Jan 30, 2018 8:31 am

The Vietnam War's Tet Offensive
By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Jan 30, 2018, 1:15 AM ET
Nguyen Van Lem, Bay LopThe Associated Press

In this Feb. 1, 1968, file photo, South Vietnamese Gen. Nguyen Ngoc Loan, chief of the National Police, fires his pistol into the head of suspected Viet Cong officer Nguyen Van Lem (also known as Bay Lop) on a Saigon street, early in the Tet Offensive.

EDITOR'S NOTE — Early on the morning of Jan. 31, 1968, as Vietnamese celebrated the Lunar New Year, or Tet as it is known locally, Communist forces launched a wave of coordinated surprise attacks across South Vietnam. The campaign — one of the largest of the Vietnam War — led to intense fighting and heavy casualties in cities and towns across the South.

While battles raged for more than a month in some places like the city of Hue, the Tet Offensive was from a strictly military standpoint a defeat for the North Vietnamese and Viet Cong forces. Yet the campaign had a profound impact on the U.S. war effort, stunning leaders in Washington and leaving the American public questioning their country's involvement in the overseas campaign.

Fifty years after their original publication, The Associated Press is making available four stories from Jan. 31, Feb. 2 and Feb. 21, 1968, written by AP journalists Peter Arnett, Edwin Q. White and John Lengel documenting the offensive. The package includes a Pulitzer Prize-winning photograph by the AP's Eddie Adams.


http://abcnews.go.com/International/wir ... e-52694626



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RTH10260
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Re: Vietnam War

#5

Post by RTH10260 » Tue Jan 30, 2018 8:33 am

A Vietnam War photographer captured the bloody Tet offensive. Fifty years later, he bears witness again.
By John Woodrow Cox January 28 Email the author

Stars and Stripes photographer John Olson captured this image of A.B. Grantham, a Marine who had been shot in the chest in 1968. It is on display at the Newseum to mark the 50th anniversary of the Tet offensive. (John Olson)
John Olson can barely remember taking the photograph.

He snapped it, at age 20, during one of the bloodiest battles of the Tet offensive, a series of simultaneous attacks that began Jan. 30, 1968, and led to the most sustained fighting in the Vietnam War.


The picture — the most important he’s ever taken — shows a half dozen Marines sprawled atop a mud-crusted tank. One man’s arm and eye are bandaged. Blood coats another’s leg. In the foreground, a third man lays atop a wooden door his comrades used as a makeshift stretcher. His shirt has been ripped off because, in the center of his chest, is a bullet hole.

Now, 50 years later, Olson’s eyes lingered on that image, the centerpiece of “The Marines and Tet,” a new exhibit featuring his photographs at the Newseum in downtown Washington. He adjusted his dark-rimmed glasses and took a deep breath.

“I have next to no memory,” Olson said of the iconic moment.

The scene might not stand out, he theorized, because the violence had been unrelenting for hours. Or maybe it was all so ghastly that his mind just blocked some things out.

During the New Year holiday known as Tet, the North Vietnamese orchestrated a barrage of daring assaults throughout South Vietnam. The operation was, in almost every sense, a military failure for America’s enemy, who lost nearly 60,000 troops, according to some estimates. Though that’s close to four times the number of U.S. service members killed during that entire year, the North Vietnamese onslaught decimated the American public’s already-dwindling support for the war.


https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/ret ... ess-again/



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RTH10260
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Re: Vietnam War

#6

Post by RTH10260 » Sun Oct 28, 2018 10:42 pm

A presentation and reading by Hamilton Gregory, author of "McNamara's Folly: The Use of Low-IQ Troops in the Vietnam." Because so many college students were avoiding military service during the Vietnam War, Defense Secretary Robert McNamara lowered mental standards to induct 354,000 low-IQ men. Their death toll in combat was appalling.



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