Today in History

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Foggy
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Today in History

#1

Post by Foggy » Tue Jun 11, 2013 2:16 pm

... yes, I put this in "Military History" but we can discuss any kind of history here ... I have a book on the history of the potato, and another about the history of Benjamin Franklin flying a kite in a thunderstorm (he never did).Anyway, placeholder whilst I moves some posts.
Edit: I think I got them all. If you find any that are missing, let me know.


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Whatever4
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Today in History

#2

Post by Whatever4 » Tue Jun 11, 2013 3:40 pm

These achievements are hopelessly overshadowed by staggering corruption. He appoints many of his campaign cronies to major positions, and they promptly loot the government in what becomes known as the “Teapot Dome” scandal, involving massive bribery and illegal loans. Unable to cope, Harding spends his days playing poker with pals, drinking, and asking friends, sometimes in tears, on advice on how to deal with his crooked friends.I've seen plenty of people claiming this administration is the most corrupt ever. I tell them they need to learn more history.


"[Moderate] doesn't mean you don't have views. It just means your views aren't predictable ideologically one way or the other, and you're trying to follow the facts where they lead and reach your own conclusions."
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esseff44
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Today in History

#3

Post by esseff44 » Tue Jun 11, 2013 3:40 pm

Harding dies of a heart attack or a stroke on August 2, 1923, in San Francisco. His state funeral is followed by accusations of suicide or poisoning, and Mrs. Harding burns her husband’s correspondence and documents. Harding winds up being ranked extremely low by historians, and Hoover says his legacy is one of “tragic betrayal.” Not to mention the term “smoke-filled room.”But was it from natural causes. AFAIK, this was never confirmed or at least not to the CT's of the day. The mansion where he stayed is just a few blocks from here. IIRC, he died at the Palace Hotel on New Montgomery Street.[/break1]trutv.com/library/crime/terrorists_spies/assassins/warren_harding/index.html]http://www.trutv.com/library/crime/terr ... index.htmlJust full of fun facts and CT's about Harding's death. Some things never change.



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Princess foofypants
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Today in History

#4

Post by Princess foofypants » Tue Jun 11, 2013 4:11 pm

I'm sticking with Henry marrying Catherine of Aragon for today. Been on a "daughters of Ferndinard and Isabella" kick lately though my fave is Juana la Loca (Joanna the Mad).



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esseff44
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Today in History

#5

Post by esseff44 » Tue Jun 11, 2013 4:14 pm

From the link about about the death of Harding:Forbes was the Cabinet member in charge of Veterans Affairs and as corrupt as they come.The boldest of the grafters was Charlie Forbes, a favorite of Mrs. Harding and the man responsible for the care of her boys, as she called the World War I veterans. As director of the Bureau of Veterans, Forbes also sold supplies to willing purchasers, but, in this instance, these were hospital supplies --- not surplus --- needed by the veterans hospitals. Worse, without approval from congress or the president, Forbes proceeded on a program of hospital construction, taking his cut from the inflated income of the contractors. In these schemes, he was assisted by the Veterans Bureau auditor, James Cramer.There is a marvelous scene, worthy of the Three Stooges, in which Harding was found choking Forbes, shouting, You yellow rat! You double-crossing bastard! Forbes asked to conduct an inspection of British veterans hospitals, and Harding forced him to write a letter of resignation before he left. It was not needed. Before Forbes could leave the ship when it arrived in Southampton, England, Forbes received a cablegram that he had been fired. A little over a month later, Cramer committed suicide. Eventually, Forbes was tried, convicted, and sentenced to two years in prison.When we read American history and about times such as those of the Harding administration, our own little scandals and gripes seem small. Of course, these activities were the precursor to the Great Depression.Also, too, Calvin Coolidge was not as 'colorless' as they made him out to be. He had a really funny lady for a wife and he had a dry sense of humor which came out in the rare times when he could be prompted to speak. One of his cousins told me lots of family stories about him. One of them has to do with a visit to a chicken farm...about happy hens and how many roosters it took to keep them that way. He also told me about the night the family was awakened by loud knocking at the home of Calvin's father in Vermont at 2:30 AM several hours earlier in SF. It was to announce the death of the president. Right then and there, the Oath of Office was administered while they were still in their night robes with Calvin's father administering the oath. They aren't in night robes in the official pictures painted of the however. They did not have the advantages of photoshopping in those days. ;)



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esseff44
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#6

Post by esseff44 » Tue Jun 11, 2013 5:25 pm

For completeness on the issue of Harding's illegitimate child:[/break1]wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_Ann_Blaesing]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_ ... esingBirth certificate trivia included.



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Today in History

#7

Post by rosy » Tue Jun 11, 2013 6:41 pm

In 1944, in World War II, the Allies launch the greatest amphibious operation in history, the invasion of Normandy, in France, hurling the US 1st Army and the British 2nd Army (including the 3rd Canadian Division) against the formidable defenses of Adolf Hitler’s Atlantic Wall. More than 160,000 soldiers, sailors, and airmen from the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, France, Australia, New Zealand, France, The Netherlands, Poland, Belgium, Denmark, and Norway storm five beaches on a 50-mile front, code-named Utah, Omaha, Gold, Juno, and Sword. The invasion also sees three airborne divisions making daring parachute and glider assaults behind German defenses, 7,000 ships on the Allied side (ranging from battleships to midget submarines), 11,590 aircraft (ranging from Lancaster and B-17 four-engine bombers to gliders), and thousands of French resistance fighters, who wrecked railroads and telephone lines, and provided vital intelligence to the invaders. In ferocious fighting, the Allies took about 10,500 casualties, half of them on Omaha Beach. The German casualty count was also about 10,000 men. But the invasion was an overwhelming Allied success – by midnight, all five invasion beaches were secure, and the Allied forces were advancing steadily inland and consolidating their positions.Some D-Day trivia:• Yogi Berra is the only major league baseball player to have served at D-Day, as a US Navy Sailor on a small landing craft.• Actors William Windom, Charles Durning, Art Carney, James Doohan, and Richard Todd all served on D-Day. Carney and Doohan were wounded, and Richard Todd went on to play a role in the movie “The Longest Day,” recreating the very action he fought in – the seizure of a key bridge. However, in the movie, he did not play himself, but the commander under whom he served.• Future US Senator Strom Thurmond was a paratrooper in the invasion of Normandy.• Only two Allied warships were sunk on D-Day, the Norwegian destroyer HNMS Svenner, a brand-new vessel, and the American destroyer USS Corry. The Svenner never had an opportunity to fire her guns in action, and Corry’s wreck was recently found.• Three Americans received the Medal of Honor for their valor on D-Day: Richard Monteith, Theodore Roosevelt, Jr., and Carlton W. Barrett. Monteith’s was earned posthumously, Roosevelt died shortly after being recommended for it (of a heart attack), and Barrett survived the war.• Only one Victoria Cross was awarded on D-Day, to Sgt. Stanley Hollis, who survived the war, to open a pub, named for his regiment, the Green Howards.• The first Allied soldier to fire his weapon on D-Day was also the first man killed, Lt. Danny Brotheridge of the British army, in a glider assault on a key bridge.• Overlooked in the news that day, the B-29 flew its first combat mission, a raid on Bangkok in Thailand. British troops held the line at Kohima and Imphal in Burma against massive Japanese assaults. US Sailors towed the freshly-captured German submarine U-505 to Bermuda.• Major League Baseball, hearing of the invasion, cancelled its entire schedule that day. It would not do so again (except for strikes) until 9/11. My previous partner's (PP) father served in D-Day, on Sword beach at Lion-sur-mer. I never knew him as he died in the early 70s, long before I met PP, but he filled PP's head with glory and an abiding love of military history/souvenirs. A few years ago I was lucky enough to find a hand-altered map of the D-Day beaches dating from the invasion in an antique shop, which I gave PP for his birthday. We spent several holidays in Northern France and Belgium, visiting cemeteries from the massive ones with crosses as far as they eye could see to the tiniest ones in villages so far off the map we'd never have found them without the information from the War Graves Commission. We also visited the V1/V2 rocket facilities at St Omer and [/break1]leblockhaus.com/modulosite2/welcome-gb.htm]Eperlecques (the latter is well worth a visit) and as many of the tiny museums that we could find. Many of the tiny museums are no more than a couple of tanks and an ex-soldier (or his wife) with a story to tell, but no advertising or web presence so the only way to find them is either word of mouth or by driving down a country lane and finding them by accident.We also managed to pay our respects to my great grandfather, buried in La Clytte cemetery in Belgium. He was killed in October 1917 at the age of 54, he enlisted because his son (my great-uncle) had been killed and he wanted to avenge his death. Such a waste of life.The Moroccan monument:[/break1]photobucket.com/user/rosysparkle/media/calais058-1.jpg.html]http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y74/ro ... 8-1.jpgThe breathtaking Canadian memorial (there are still live ordnance in the fields surrounding the monument, so stick to the paths!):[/break1]photobucket.com/user/rosysparkle/media/calais045.jpg.html]http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y74/ro ... pgTrenches around the Canadian memorial:[/break1]photobucket.com/user/rosysparkle/media/calais050.jpg.html]http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y74/ro ... .jpgBlurry V2 at Eperlecques:[/break1]photobucket.com/user/rosysparkle/media/calais108-1.jpg.html]http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y74/ro ... 108-1.jpgA grave of an 'unknown soldier' from the Great War (WWI) at Puchevillers:[/break1]photobucket.com/user/rosysparkle/media/calais035.jpg.html]http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y74/ro ... 035.jpgTwo brothers at Puchevilliers:[/break1]photobucket.com/user/rosysparkle/media/calais069.jpg.html]http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y74/ro ... .jpgJoseph Kennedy's memorial at [/break1]mimoyecques.com/]Mimoyecques:[/break1]photobucket.com/user/rosysparkle/media/calais020.jpg.html]http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y74/ro ... ais020.jpg



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Whatever4
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Today in History

#8

Post by Whatever4 » Tue Jun 11, 2013 7:26 pm

Yup, I'm liking this thread separated out. Thanks, boss!


"[Moderate] doesn't mean you don't have views. It just means your views aren't predictable ideologically one way or the other, and you're trying to follow the facts where they lead and reach your own conclusions."
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#9

Post by TollandRCR » Tue Jun 11, 2013 9:49 pm

This is so good.


“The truth is, we know so little about life, we don’t really know what the good news is and what the bad news is.” Kurt Vonnegut

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Foggy
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#10

Post by Foggy » Wed Jun 12, 2013 7:07 am

Awesome post, Rosy!! This is going to be a GREAT thread.Both my uncles served in WWII, one in the Navy and one in the Army. My dad was too young, but he used to tell us that he had ended the war. How, you ask? (or even if you don't ask)He enrolled in the U.S. Naval Academy in Aug. 1945 and two weeks later the Japanese surrendered because they heard he was coming! :lol:


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#11

Post by Princess foofypants » Wed Jun 12, 2013 2:06 pm

Today in history, Anne Frank was born. Cosimo de Medici also.



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Whatever4
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#12

Post by Whatever4 » Wed Jun 12, 2013 5:41 pm

The highest-ranking British general captured by the Germans, Fortune spends the war in the bagSay what? :-k


"[Moderate] doesn't mean you don't have views. It just means your views aren't predictable ideologically one way or the other, and you're trying to follow the facts where they lead and reach your own conclusions."
-- Sen. King (R-ME)

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