European Union

Tarrant
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Re: European Union

#101

Post by Tarrant » Wed May 25, 2016 9:15 am

If one candidate/party isn't willing to acknowledge the public's issues on a topic, then people will vote for someone that at least acknowledges their concerns even if they disagree with the rest of the platform.

This is what has led - partially - to Trump's (and Sanders') rise. Regardless of whether their concerns are justified or not, the American people have actual concerns about the economy, refugees, what have you. When the Obama administration told Sen. Warren that a key reason the TPP was secret was that there would be "overwhelming public opposition" if it's provisions were widely known, her response was - rightly - that if any policy of the government would lead to such overwhelming opposition were it known, then said position shouldn't be the policy of the nation. It gives power to people like Trump who accurately note the damage these agreements can do and the secrecy with which they are negotiated - and while, like Mikedunford, I'm generally in favor of them, it often feels like the provisions that favor multinationals always get implemented, but the parts that protect the nation's people lag behind, if they're ever funded and implemented at all.

The leaders of a nation are elected by the people of that nations and they rightly want those leaders to put that nation's welfare - economy, safety, what have you - before external concerns. Even when people absolutely feel like the plight of other people is a noble cause, that does not mean they feel like their nation should shoulder the burden of providing the solution.

Merkel's party is also feeling serious heat over her refugee policies - even though the German people feel incredible sympathy over the plight of the refugees, it doesn't mean they want Germany to take them all in - and they feel like their concerns are being run over. If the people feel like their leaders - even when they widely agree with most policies - are completely ignoring them on some issues, they'll vote for people that aren't, even when those people are Trump. The Republican establishment is learning this.

This is why Clinton cannot and should not take Trump lightly - she's widely viewed as someone who is in favor of the status quo on many of these economic issues. It's why she's having trouble with Sanders to her left. It's on the administration and her campaign to make the case for why some of these things are in the national interest, or she may find herself on the outside looking in.



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Re: European Union

#102

Post by TollandRCR » Wed May 25, 2016 2:44 pm

Many of us believe and have stated that the solution to the EU's problem of mass immigration lies in the countries of origin, not within the EU states. That will become ever more obvious when environmental migration becomes the dominant motivation for migration. What is now a stream will become a river.


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Re: European Union

#103

Post by Suranis » Wed Jun 01, 2016 10:37 am

Image

Bwahahaaa!


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Re: European Union

#104

Post by Addie » Sat Jun 04, 2016 7:57 am

The Guardian
State handouts for all? Europe set to pilot universal basic incomes

To its acolytes, it is the revolutionary policy idea whose arrival is as urgently needed as it is inevitable. In a future in which robots decimate the jobs but not necessarily the wealth of nations, they argue, states should be able to afford to pay all their citizens a basic income unconditional of needs or requirements.

Universal basic income has a rare appeal across the political spectrum. For those on the left, it promises to eliminate poverty and liberate people stuck in dead-end workfare jobs. Small-state libertarians believe it could slash bureaucracy and create a leaner, more self-sufficient welfare system. ...

Crucially, it is also an idea that seems to resonate across the wider public. A recent poll by Dalia Research found that 68% of people across all 28 EU member states said they would definitely or probably vote for a universal basic income initiative. Finland and the Netherlands have pilot projects in the pipeline.

This weekend the concept faces its first proper test of public opinion, as Switzerland votes on a proposal to introduce a national basic income.

The model on which Swiss citizens will vote on 5 June sits at the left-liberal end of the spectrum. The wording on the ballot paper is vague – it calls for the country’s constitution to be changed to “guarantee the introduction of an unconditional basic income” that guarantees “a humane existence and participation in public life for the whole population” – but the proposed scale is ambitious.


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Re: European Union

#105

Post by Flatpointhigh » Sat Jun 04, 2016 10:03 am

and, the EU castigated Greece over it's "handout State"



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TollandRCR
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Re: European Union

#106

Post by TollandRCR » Sat Jun 04, 2016 11:15 am

Arise George McGovern, the idea (from James Tobin) of a minimum income is back on the stage (in Europe, that is). Of course, $5,554 in 2013 dollars is not much of an income. You could not even subsist on Cheetos with that.


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Re: European Union

#107

Post by Flatpointhigh » Sat Jun 04, 2016 11:22 am

TollandRCR wrote:Arise George McGovern, the idea (from James Tobin) of a minimum income is back on the stage (in Europe, that is). Of course, $5,554 in 2013 dollars is not much of an income. You could not even subsist on Cheetos with that.
Working 12 hrs/week for 30 weeks @ $17.50/hr nets me around $6300 BEFORE taxes. I'm so far down below the poverty level, I don't exist. however, the Safety Net has caught me.



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Re: European Union

#108

Post by Addie » Sat Jun 04, 2016 4:22 pm

New York Times
How Kosovo Was Turned Into Fertile Ground for ISIS

PRISTINA, Kosovo — Every Friday, just yards from a statue of Bill Clinton with arm aloft in a cheery wave, hundreds of young bearded men make a show of kneeling to pray on the sidewalk outside an improvised mosque in a former furniture store.

The mosque is one of scores built here with Saudi government money and blamed for spreading Wahhabism — the conservative ideology dominant in Saudi Arabia — in the 17 years since an American-led intervention wrested tiny Kosovo from Serbian oppression.

Since then — much of that time under the watch of American officials — Saudi money and influence have transformed this once-tolerant Muslim society at the hem of Europe into a font of Islamic extremism and a pipeline for jihadists.

Kosovo now finds itself, like the rest of Europe, fending off the threat of radical Islam. Over the last two years, the police have identified 314 Kosovars — including two suicide bombers, 44 women and 28 children — who have gone abroad to join the Islamic State, the highest number per capita in Europe.

They were radicalized and recruited, Kosovo investigators say, by a corps of extremist clerics and secretive associations funded by Saudi Arabia and other conservative Arab gulf states using an obscure, labyrinthine network of donations from charities, private individuals and government ministries.


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Re: European Union

#109

Post by Addie » Sun Jun 05, 2016 9:06 am

Reuters
Swiss voters set to reject guaranteed basic income initiative: TV

Swiss voters rejected by a wide margin a proposal to introduce a guaranteed basic income for everyone living in the wealthy country, projections by the GFS polling group for Swiss broadcaster SRF showed on Sunday.

First projections showed around 78 percent of voters rejected the initiative by Basel cafe owner Daniel Haeni and allies in a vote under the Swiss system of direct democracy, but it captured an uneasy debate about the future of work at a time of increasing automation. ...

Switzerland is the first country to hold a national referendum on an unconditional basic income, but other countries including Finland are examining similar plans.

The Swiss government had urged voters to reject the campaign, saying the scheme would cost too much and undermine societal cohesion.

The plan included replacing in full or in part what people got from social benefits.
Addie wrote:The Guardian
State handouts for all? Europe set to pilot universal basic incomes


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Re: European Union

#110

Post by LeGargantua » Sun Jun 05, 2016 9:58 am

Tarrant wrote:When the Obama administration told Sen. Warren that a key reason the TPP was secret was that there would be "overwhelming public opposition" if it's provisions were widely known, her response was - rightly - that if any policy of the government would lead to such overwhelming opposition were it known, then said position shouldn't be the policy of the nation. It gives power to people like Trump who accurately note the damage these agreements can do and the secrecy with which they are negotiated - and while, like Mikedunford, I'm generally in favor of them, it often feels like the provisions that favor multinationals always get implemented, but the parts that protect the nation's people lag behind, if they're ever funded and implemented at all.
In Germany the public opposition to TPP is already overwhelming and here in France people have begun to wake up. There will be no TPP before Pres. Obama leaves office.

To be honest - I want neither chlorine soaked chicken nor Camembert or Feta from Wisconsin in our supermarkets. Going cheap at any cost is the wrong way.



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Re: European Union

#111

Post by Addie » Mon Jun 06, 2016 1:34 pm

WSJ
Populist Candidate Wins First Round of Rome Mayoral Election

ROME—An Italian antiestablishment movement scored a significant victory in the first round of Rome’s mayoral election, dealing a political setback to Prime Minister Matteo Renzi’s ruling center-left party.

Virginia Raggi, the candidate for the upstart, euroskeptic 5 Star Movement won 35% of votes cast Sunday in Rome, according to the final vote tally. Roberto Giachetti, the candidate for Mr. Renzi’s Democratic Party, received 25%. The two now face a runoff election on June 19.

Millions of Italians went to the polls on Sunday to cast their votes in local elections for new mayors and town councilors in more than 1,300 cities and towns. The elections—held in some of Italy’s biggest cities—was widely seen as a political test for Mr. Renzi and his efforts to revive Italy’s long-suffering economy.

The strong showing of the 5 Star Movement and the weaker-than-expected results for the Democratic Party in cities such as Milan and Naples as well reflected in part Italians’ impatience with stubbornly high unemployment and a growth rate that is half the European Union average.


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Re: European Union

#112

Post by Addie » Sun Nov 20, 2016 9:27 pm

WSJ
Nicolas Sarkozy, in Upset, Is Knocked Out of Race for French Presidency

PARIS—Nicolas Sarkozy’s campaign to reclaim the French presidency came to an abrupt end after a surge of support for his former prime minister, notching another upset in a year of electoral upheaval for the West’s political establishment.

Mr. Sarkozy, who centered his campaign on pledges for hard-line security measures and a clampdown on immigration, was hobbled in the conservative primary race by François Fillon, his once-close ally who ran on a pledge to deliver a shock to the French economy with deep spending cuts and labor overhauls.

Less than a month ago, polls credited Mr. Fillon with less than 15% of the first-round vote. On Sunday, results from 9,347 of the 10,229 polling stations across the country showed he won 44.2% of the votes in a field of seven candidates, ahead of the 28.5% received by Bordeaux Mayor Alain Juppé , who recent polls showed had been the favorite to win the primary. Mr. Sarkozy, by contrast, won just 20.6% of votes. ...

The former French leader’s elimination in the first round and Mr. Fillon’s surprise rise to front-runner upend a conservative primary that has centered on how to stop the rise of National Front leader Marine Le Pen. ...

The 62-year-old, who served as prime minister between 2007 and 2012, argues that the malaise behind all of France’s woes is economic and financial. The most pro-business of the candidates, he proposes scrapping swaths of France’s labor code, ditching the 35-hour workweek, taking power from labor unions and increasing sales taxes on consumers to help fund tax breaks for business.


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Re: European Union

#113

Post by Addie » Sun Nov 27, 2016 5:07 pm

Reuters
Fillon scores huge win in French conservative presidential primaries

Francois Fillon, a socially conservative free-marketeer, won France's center-right presidential primaries on Sunday, setting up a likely showdown next year with far-right leader Marine Le Pen that the pollsters expect him to win.

With votes from four-fifths of 10,228 polling stations counted, Fillon, who went into Sunday's second-round run-off as firm favorite, had won over 67 percent of the vote in a head-to-head battle with another ex-prime minister, Alain Juppe.

"I must now convince the whole country our project is the only one that can lift us up," a visibly moved Fillon said at his campaign headquarters after Juppe conceded defeat.

All eyes now turn to the ruling Socialist party and to whether the deeply unpopular President Francois Hollande will decide to run for the left-wing ticket in his party's primaries in January, amid signs that his prime minister, Manuel Valls, is considering a bid of his own.

France, the euro zone's second largest economy, has faced stubbornly high unemployment under Hollande, and the past two years of his term have been marked by Islamist militant attacks that have killed 230 people and focused attention on immigration and security concerns too.


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Re: European Union

#114

Post by Addie » Thu Dec 01, 2016 8:56 am

Politico
Meltdown at the European Parliament

The carefully calibrated “grand coalition” of Europe’s dominant political parties, which EU leaders have relied on to sustain their agenda and to manage a series of crises since 2014, this week imploded amid the collapse of a power-sharing deal in the European Parliament and the start of a bruising fight over the Parliament presidency.

The rupture cast a shadow of uncertainty over Brussels, raising the prospect of weeks of distraction and legislative paralysis, and leaving European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker and European Council President Donald Tusk with little choice but to watch in dismay from the sidelines and brace for further turbulence.

The fragility of the coalition had been clear even before Parliament President Martin Schulz, a member of the Progressive Alliance of Socialists and Democrats (S&D), last week announced his plans to step down and return to Germany to run for a seat in the Bundestag. But the scope of disarray resulting from his departure is now coming into focus.

The power-sharing agreement had called for the presidency to pass next year from the S&D, the second-largest group in Parliament, to the center-right European People’s Party (EPP), the largest group, which also controls the Commission and the Council, through Juncker and Tusk.

But any hope of an orderly transition to fill the presidency evaporated Wednesday as Gianni Pittella, the Italian leader of the S&D, officially declared his candidacy for the top job, setting off a free-for-all among party leaders.


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Re: European Union

#115

Post by Addie » Thu Dec 01, 2016 2:34 pm

BBC Breaking News
France's Hollande decides not to run again

Francois Hollande has stunned France by declaring he will not seek a second term as president of France.

Mr Hollande, faced with very low popularity ratings, has become the first sitting president in modern French history not to seek re-election.

In a televised address he said he was aware of the risks of not running and warned of the threat from the far-right National Front.


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Re: European Union

#116

Post by Addie » Thu Dec 01, 2016 9:26 pm

New York Times
In France, a Candidate Intent on a Conservative Overhaul

PARIS — He compares himself to Margaret Thatcher, the British leader who set her country on a right-leaning economic course. A French newspaper splashed him on its cover with the Iron Lady’s hairdo and pearl earrings.

François Fillon, the conservative politician who has vaulted to the forefront of France’s presidential race against the far-right National Front leader Marine Le Pen, is vowing to make France’s economy great again. Campaigning on fears of a country in decline, he has pledged “shock therapy” to liberalize the economy, à la Mrs. Thatcher, through a program of shrinking big government, aiding business and facing down France’s powerful labor unions.

His brash talk has raised concerns about a radical shift from French traditions, while reviving a perennial question: Can France actually be reformed?

“The short answer is yes, but not so ambitiously,” said Mujtaba Rahman, the managing director for Europe at Eurasia Group, a political risk consultancy. “The French love economic reform in theory. They hate it in practice once they understand what it means.”

While the French economy has become more open and competitive in recent decades, resistance breaks out almost anytime the government tries to reshape France’s way of life, especially the vaunted social model, designed to protect citizens from the ravages of the free market. When the focus is on whittling hard-fought human and worker rights — a concept whose roots reach back to the French Revolution — tensions can boil over.


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Re: European Union

#117

Post by Addie » Sat Dec 03, 2016 1:05 pm

WaPo
Amid global anti-establishment anger, Italy may be next in line for upheaval

ROME — Amid a global wave of anti-establishment anger, Italy may be the next in line for upheaval after a Sunday referendum that could topple Prime Minister Matteo Renzi and cast the nation into political crisis.

With Britain quitting the European Union and Donald Trump headed to the White House, Italy’s anti-immigrant Five Star Movement, led by a caustic comedian-turned-politician, is poised to capitalize on voter anger over a stagnant economy and a surge in migration from North Africa.

If Italians reject constitutional reforms championed by Renzi, he has vowed to resign, opening the door to a gust of financial uncertainty that could set off an Italian banking crisis. A defeat for Renzi would also embolden populists across Europe, where elections in France and Germany next year threaten to deliver Euroskeptics as leaders of the bulwarks of European unity.

And in Italy, the Five Star Movement, within spitting distance of Renzi’s Democratic Party in the polls, would have a shot at the prime minister’s office in elections due no later than 2018. Even if Renzi prevails Sunday, the populists could still be poised to overtake him at the next election. ...

The Five Star Movement has vowed to hold a referendum on membership in the euro currency zone if ever they capture Italy’s top office, a step that could ultimately split the entire E.U. The fiery leader of the party, comedian Beppe Grillo, has praised Trump’s attitudes toward immigrants and vowed to build an Italian version of his triumph.


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Re: European Union

#118

Post by Addie » Sat Dec 03, 2016 7:26 pm

Reuters
Far right has second chance in Austrian presidential election

Austria will provide a new gauge of the populist wave sweeping Western democracies on Sunday, as the divided country holds a vote that could deliver the first freely-elected far-right head of state in Europe since World War Two.

The knife-edge presidential run-off is all the more dramatic for being a re-run of an election held six months ago - before Britain chose to leave the European Union and Americans elected Donald Trump as president - offering an indication of whether popular anger at the political establishment has grown. ...

Opinion polls suggest the race remains too close to call and could again come down to postal ballots, meaning the final result might come as late as Tuesday. The first projections are due shortly after polling stations close at 5 p.m. (11.00 a.m. ET).

What influence Trump and Brexit have had on Austria is unclear, but the fault lines are similar - blue-collar workers have largely backed Hofer, the highly educated favor his opponent, former Greens leader Alexander Van der Bellen.

Van der Bellen, 72, has put Brexit at the heart of his campaign, arguing that Hofer wants Austria to hold its own "Oexit" referendum, putting jobs at risk in the small, trade-dependent country.


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Re: European Union

#119

Post by Addie » Sun Dec 04, 2016 1:03 pm

A bit of relief here. :thumbs:

WSJ
Austria Center-Left Candidate Deals Blow to Populists

VIENNA—Center-left candidate Alexander Van der Bellen beat back a challenge from a right-wing populist opponent to become Austria’s next president, exit polls and early results in the country’s second-round presidential election on Sunday showed.

Mr. Van der Bellen, 72 years old, led his opponent Norbert Hofer by 53.6% to 46.4% of the vote, according to Austrian television projections based on exit polls and early results. Mr. Hofer congratulated Mr. Van der Bellen on his victory in a Facebook post and called on all Austrians to “stick together and work together.”

Mr. Van der Bellen notched a rare victory for supporters of European integration and liberal internationalism in a year in which nationalism and populism swept across the West.

The Freedom Party’s Mr. Hofer would have become the first right-wing populist president in postwar Western Europe. Like the other populists across the Continent, Mr. Hofer wanted to roll back the power of the European Union, toughen border controls, crack down on the continuing flow of refugees and migrants to Europe, and improve relations with Russian President Vladimir Putin.


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Re: European Union

#120

Post by Addie » Sun Dec 04, 2016 6:41 pm

BBC News
Italy referendum: PM Matteo Renzi suffers heavy defeat, exit polls suggest

Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi has suffered a heavy defeat in a referendum over his plan to reform the constitution, exit polls suggest.

An exit poll for state broadcaster RAI suggests 42-46% voted to back reform, compared with 54-58% voting No.

The first projection based on the vote count points to an even wider defeat: Yes at 39-43% and No at 57-61%.

Mr Renzi, who has said he would resign if he lost the vote, is due to make a statement at midnight (23:00 GMT).

The referendum was regarded as a barometer of anti-establishment sentiment in Europe.


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Re: European Union

#121

Post by RTH10260 » Sun Dec 04, 2016 6:54 pm

Italy referendum: PM Matteo Renzi resigns after clear referendum defeat

"My experience of government finishes here" - Matteo Renzi after losing a reform referendum

Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi has resigned after suffering a heavy defeat in a referendum over his plan to reform the constitution.
In a late-night statement, he said he took responsibility for the outcome. He said the No camp must now make clear proposals.



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Re: European Union

#122

Post by Addie » Wed Dec 07, 2016 7:52 am

WaPo
The future of the E.U. is at stake as Europe’s leaders face a new fear: Voters

BRUSSELS — Europe’s leaders have a new fear — their own voters.

A ballot-box revolution is gathering steam on the troubled continent, where citizens this year have seized opportunities to depose top officials and step into the unknown. The latest ouster was Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi, after his nation overwhelmingly rejected his signature reforms this past weekend. But France, the Netherlands and Germany all face tough elections next year, and the fate of the European Union is in the balance.

The discontent has been fueled in part by the lingering effect of the 2008 global economic crisis, which continues to depress many of Europe’s job markets. But anti-establishment parties are thriving even in prosperous countries that escaped the worst of the pain, capitalizing on resentment toward immigrants, fears about the future and a backlash toward globalization that itself has become a global trend. ...

“There’s a way success breeds success with these parties,” said Mark Leonard, the head of the European Council on Foreign Relations.

“The Brexit vote did create a sense of the possibility of winning for Trump. His election makes it less preposterous that Marine Le Pen might win in France,” he said, referring to the far-right French leader who wants to drastically roll back E.U. powers. “And if Marine Le Pen wins in France, that will be a shock to the European system many times greater even than the Brexit vote.”

Even before the votes are cast, mainstream politicians are making concessions to thriving far-left and far-right parties in an effort to blunt their appeal. French President Fran­çois Hollande, whose popularity has scraped a record-low 4 percent, made the unprecedented announcement last week that he would not seek reelection in order for another Socialist to stand a chance at succeeding him.


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Re: European Union

#123

Post by Sam the Centipede » Wed Dec 07, 2016 10:17 am

Addie wrote:WaPo
:snippity:
“The Brexit vote did create a sense of the possibility of winning for Trump. His election makes it less preposterous that Marine Le Pen might win in France,” he said, referring to the far-right French leader who wants to drastically roll back E.U. powers. “And if Marine Le Pen wins in France, that will be a shock to the European system many times greater even than the Brexit vote.”
A shock perhaps, but not necessarily a major suprise. In the 2002 election (France's presidential elections are at 5 yearly intervals now) the run-off was between the Front Nationale (extreme right wing) Jean-Marie Le Pen and the awful Jacques Chirac (sane right wing) because the many left wing candidates had fragmented the vote so that none of the left wing candidates was in the top two for the run-off. The French electorate held their noses and voted for Chirac as the least worst option. Jean-Marie Le Pen attracted 18% of the second round vote, barely more than the 17% he achieved in the first round.

That was 15 years ago, and Marine Le Pen is a less immediately repulsive character than her father. And racism is far more acceptable in France than in many other western countries. The Front Nationale are definitely in the running, especially given France's electoral system, where only the top two from the first round go into the second, so tactical voting could be very important to avoid a repeat of 2002.

Opinion polls suggest Marine Le Pen will lose the second round against possible challengers, but the numbers are something like 60% to 40%. That is not a huge margin, given the complete failure of poll-based forecasts in other countries recently.

The "anyone but this racist asshole" vote against Jean-Marie Le Pen will not be as big a group for Marine Le Pen.



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Re: European Union

#124

Post by Addie » Fri Dec 09, 2016 9:19 am

Independent
EU negotiators will offer Brits an individual opt-in to remain EU citizens, chief negotiator confirms

EU negotiators will offer British people the chance to individually opt-in and remain EU citizens as a proposal in Brexit negotiations, the European Parliament’s chief negotiator has confirmed.

The proposal, first revealed in its early stages by The Independent last month, was being considered as a long-term aim by the European Parliament – but has now been fast-tracked to the negotiating table by Guy Verhofstadt, who is in charge of thrashing out a post-Brexit deal.

Mr Verhofstadt said the “very important” proposal had “captured the imagination and hopes” of many British people who wished to retain their rights as EU citizens and would be in his negotiating mandate.

The plan would see Brits offered individual “associate citizenship”, letting them keep free movement to live and work across the EU, as well as a vote in European Parliament elections.

The proposal could potentially give Brits who live and work across borders a workaround to the disruption caused by the Leave vote – and young people looking to flee an increasingly isolated UK greater choice over where to move to.


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Re: European Union

#125

Post by Flatpointhigh » Fri Dec 09, 2016 11:13 am

So, the EU is compromising due to the fear of other Nations leaving. :smoking:



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