General Sexism Thread

Lunaluz
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Re: General Sexism Thread

#76

Post by Lunaluz » Sat Sep 10, 2016 5:31 pm

"Such studies last longer than one day and women under a certain age can and do get pregnant any day."

Well that may be true.. but you could have the females of childbearing ages in the study, take a pee test pregnancy test say once a week. I think that might be a way to keep things in check. Excluding almost half the population from medical testing of medications seems rather backward to me. If I can spitball possible solutions so can everyone else.



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RVInit
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Re: General Sexism Thread

#77

Post by RVInit » Sat Sep 10, 2016 5:31 pm

HighPlainsDrifter wrote:
RVInit wrote:
HighPlainsDrifter wrote:
I would not call it sexism to not test medications on women. You would not want to test something on a pregnant woman and hurt the fetus.
Are you suggesting that it's not possible to find a population of women that are not pregnant at a given time? I agree that we don't want to be using pregnant women for drug studies, but women who aren't pregnant Shirley are available.
Such studies last longer than one day and women under a certain age can and do get pregnant any day.
There is a good deal of information and discussion regarding women, pregnancy, and drug testing and I doubt that we are going to solve all the issues here. First, drug testing is done in stages and not all participants are used in each phase. More often different populations are used in different phases.

An interesting problem - women who are pregnant DO get sick. It would have been helpful for instance with thalidomide, had pregnant women been a part of the testing. Instead, thousands of babies were born with severe birth defects because the effect on pregnant women was unknown. These babies suffered precisely because of the attitude of removing women from drug studies. You may find it surprising to note that guidelines since the mid-1990's for testing actually recommend that women of child-bearing age NOT be excluded from participating in drug studies. But strictly for the sake of argument, of course a woman can avoid pregnancy, particularly if they have been asked as a part of a study to avoid getting pregnant.
Edit: Also just realized - wiped out the word "some" in my original posting.The sentence should have been that we don't want to include pregnant women in "some" drug studies. I didn't realize in wiping out part of an original sentence I also wiped out the word "some". Oops


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Catislava
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Re: General Sexism Thread

#78

Post by Catislava » Sat Sep 10, 2016 5:49 pm

I participated in medical studies that included taking drugs or a placebo when I was still fertile and able to become pregnant. I was warned that the effects on a fetus were not known, so I was STRONGLY encouraged not to become pregnant during the course of the study. I've been injected, run through MRI machines, taken unknown pills, and poked so many times for blood draws that I can't count them all. And never ONCE was I turned down for a study because I might become pregnant.



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RVInit
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Re: General Sexism Thread

#79

Post by RVInit » Sat Sep 10, 2016 5:53 pm

Catislava wrote:I participated in medical studies that included taking drugs or a placebo when I was still fertile and able to become pregnant. I was warned that the effects on a fetus were not known, so I was STRONGLY encouraged not to become pregnant during the course of the study. I've been injected, run through MRI machines, taken unknown pills, and poked so many times for blood draws that I can't count them all. And never ONCE was I turned down for a study because I might become pregnant.
That is good to know. The guidelines have changed and researchers are actually cautioned not to use "child bearing age" to rule a person out for study.


"I know that human being and fish can coexist peacefully"
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Catislava
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Re: General Sexism Thread

#80

Post by Catislava » Sat Sep 10, 2016 6:02 pm

RVInit wrote:
Catislava wrote:I participated in medical studies that included taking drugs or a placebo when I was still fertile and able to become pregnant. I was warned that the effects on a fetus were not known, so I was STRONGLY encouraged not to become pregnant during the course of the study. I've been injected, run through MRI machines, taken unknown pills, and poked so many times for blood draws that I can't count them all. And never ONCE was I turned down for a study because I might become pregnant.
That is good to know. The guidelines have changed and researchers are actually cautioned not to use "child bearing age" to rule a person out for study.
I loved participating in medical studies. I only turned down a couple: one to test a malaria vaccine (in the previous version, once the participants were exposed to malaria, they all came down with it!) and one to test an Ebola vaccine. Both were a bit too risky for my tastes.



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magdalen77
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Re: General Sexism Thread

#81

Post by magdalen77 » Sun Sep 11, 2016 1:42 am

I have to say that when I went to the urgent care complaining about pain in my upper left arm and concerned that it might mean a heart attack they took it very seriously. They called an ambulance and sent me to the nearest ER. And the docs in the ER took it seriously as well. They admitted me for more testing and observation. They kept me for a day and a half. But I did know that women had different heart attack symptoms and I had taken some low dose aspirin (that I always have with me) which seemed to alleviate the symptoms. So, possibly they were more conscientious because I was a bit more knowledgeable. Also, I'm 57 (i.e.long past menopause) and overweight. That might have made them take my pain more seriously.

BTW, there was no heart attack. It might have just been stress due to my Daddy getting much sicker around then.



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GreatGrey
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Re: General Sexism Thread

#82

Post by GreatGrey » Sun Sep 11, 2016 1:53 am

Trump gave Pam Bondi $25,000 for dropping the Trump U investigation in Florida.

He gave Greg Abbott $35,000 for doing the same thing in Texas.

Why does Donald pay his women 71% of what he pays a man for doing the same job?


I am not "someone upthread".
Trump needs to be smashed into some kind of inedible orange pâté.

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Plutodog
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Re: General Sexism Thread

#83

Post by Plutodog » Sun Sep 11, 2016 8:15 am

GreatGrey wrote:Trump gave Pam Bondi $25,000 for dropping the Trump U investigation in Florida.

He gave Greg Abbott $35,000 for doing the same thing in Texas.

Why does Donald pay his women 71% of what he pays a man for doing the same job?
Excellent question, excellently put. Stolen with attribution on FB. :clap:


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RVInit
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Re: General Sexism Thread

#84

Post by RVInit » Sun Sep 11, 2016 10:17 am

GreatGrey wrote:Trump gave Pam Bondi $25,000 for dropping the Trump U investigation in Florida.

He gave Greg Abbott $35,000 for doing the same thing in Texas.

Why does Donald pay his women 71% of what he pays a man for doing the same job?
:notworthy:


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Suranis
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Re: General Sexism Thread

#85

Post by Suranis » Thu Nov 09, 2017 7:10 am

This is a transcript of a podcast by 6 very successful women, and their experiences in the government workplace as they moved up the ranks. Very interesting reading. I'll just post their introductions the rest is worth reading in full.

https://www.politico.com/magazine/story ... ipt-215790
Sexism on America's Front Lines: The Full Transcript

November 06, 2017

Amid a rising national clamor over sexual harassment, six top female national security experts sat down with Susan Glasser for a special episode of The Global Politico podcast about the culture of everyday sexual harassment and sexism that is still rampant in the national security world.

Loren DeJonge Schulman: I’m Loren DeJonge Shulman. I spent about 10 years working at the Department of Defense and National Security Council, both under the Bush and Obama administrations, and another few since then working in the think tank world in national security.

Julie Smith: Julie Smith. I served in the White House and the Pentagon in the Obama Administration. First in the Pentagon as the principal director for Europe and NATO policy and then at the White House as the vice president’s deputy national security advisor.

Kathleen Hicks: Kathleen Hicks. I spent about 17 years in the Defense Department in both career and political positions ranging from the Clinton Administration all the way through the Obama Administration, culminating as the principal deputy undersecretary for policy.

Laura Rosenberger: I’m Laura Rosenberger. I served for 11 years in the State Department and the National Security Council at the White House. The vast majority of that time as a career official; part of that time, sharing a closet with Loren Schulman.

Susan Glasser: A very prestigious closet.

Rosenberger: A very, very prestigious closet directly outside of the door of the National Security Advisor’s office. I’ll leave that there. And after that, I served as Hillary Clinton’s foreign policy advisor on her 2016 campaign.

Eoyang: I’m Mieke Eoyang and before I was in think-tank land, I spent 12 years on the Hill. I served as a professional staff member on the House Armed Services Committee, a professional staff member on the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence and as the defense policy advisor to Senator Edward M. Kennedy of Massachusetts.

Evelyn Farkas: I’m Evelyn Farkas. I’ve worked in the national security field for about 30 years, including overseas in various think tanks, and then for about the last 20 years in Washington, almost equally divided between Congress, working for the Senate Armed Services Committee and a congressional commission, and then also, for the Pentagon.

Glasser: Well, I’m Susan Glasser. Welcome back to The Global POLITICO. As you can see, I am very lucky and privileged to be surrounded by some really bad-ass women. So I want to thank everybody for your time today. Seriously, it is a privilege and this is a group that has convened informally in various settings and I’ve already been enriched by the deep knowledge and understanding of things at which we journalists tend to only skim the surface on. But I feel like we’ve all been experiencing in a way, this national conversation that’s erupted over sexual harassment in the workplace. Both as observers and just readers and consumers of this information, but of course, also as women professionals and there’s the third layer, which is the reason that we’re here today, which is that we all know something that’s very hard to communicate but is really important: Women in national security, women in our foreign policy establishment here in Washington are a minority of a minority of a minority..


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