Science, General Stuff

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Whatever4
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1251

Post by Whatever4 »

Foggy wrote: Tue Feb 05, 2019 10:37 am If women have young brains, how come they can't think like normal people? :think:
Sekrit Stuffs!
:blink:
Sez the guy who smoked enough weed to ... something. :smoking:
"[Moderate] doesn't mean you don't have views. It just means your views aren't predictable ideologically one way or the other, and you're trying to follow the facts where they lead and reach your own conclusions."
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1252

Post by Foggy »

:rockon:
Buckle up, peeps, this ride is gonna get BUMPY. :shock:
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Sam the Centipede
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1253

Post by Sam the Centipede »

Tiredretiredlawyer wrote: Tue Feb 05, 2019 10:32 am https://www.bing.com/News/MSNOverlay?ur ... M%3dCATEBS
Pointing to existing research, the team surmised that women’s brains could be free from neurocognitive decline for longer for a number of reasons.
:snippity:
Further research is needed to uncover whether the neoteny of women helps them to avoid neurodegenerative diseases.
Hmm. That seems an arguable point. Obviously one has to be careful interpreting any observation that more elderly women have neurocognitive problems than men because that result is affected by women's longer average lifespan, i.e. there are more old women.

From the abstract of a 2016 report on Alzheimer's Disease in men and women Sex differences in cognitive impairment in Alzheimer’s disease:
This is despite clear evidence that AD [Alzheimer's Disease] is more prevalent in women, and converging lines of evidence from brain imaging, post-mortem analyses, hormone therapy and genetics suggesting that AD affects men and women differently. We provide an overview of evidence attesting to the poorer cognitive profiles in women than in men at the same stage of AD.
I really like modern science, but I worry that so many reports come out with results that suggest an urgency to find something novel to say, presumably to help snare the next grant award. It's difficult to discern what is good science and what is sloppy work well-presented or a trawl through data looking for possibly spurious correlations.
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1254

Post by RTH10260 »

Happy Sesquicentennial, Periodic Table!
The organizing scheme that revolutionized our understanding of the chemical elements turns 150 in 2019

By Eric Scerri on January 22, 2019

Scientific theories tend to come and go over the years. In fact, there is a rather pessimistic slogan among philosophers of science that says, “All theories are born refuted,” meaning that sooner or later they are all replaced. It may therefore come as something of a surprise that the periodic table of the elements, which is 150 years old in 2019, should have survived for so long. Admittedly it may not technically be a theory as such, but the periodic table has nevertheless served as a scientific organizing principle of enormous power and influence since it was first published.

The table was laid out in 1869 by the Russian chemist Dmitri Mendeleev who realized that the properties of the elements seem to recur approximately after every eight elements if they are placed in order of their increasing atomic weights. Lithium, for example is a soft, reactive metal. So is sodium, which comes eight spots later on the list. And so is potassium, another eight spots later. As with nearly all scientific discoveries, other scientists had come close to making the same discovery but for one reason or another they did not receive much credit. The very first hint of chemical periodicity was announced by a French engineer, Alexandre-Émile de Chancourtois, who also designed a three-dimensional periodic system that he named the telluric screw.

Then came two London based chemists, John Newlands and William Odling, who arrived at their own rudimentary periodic tables while working completely independently. In the United States a Danish émigré, Gustav Hinrichs, also realized that the elements could all be placed within one coherent system, as did the German chemist Julius Lothar Meyer. But none of these scientists was able to make predictions about new elements that might be discovered, as Mendeleev did, or to champion the value of the periodic table to the same extent as he succeeded in doing.


https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/ob ... dic-table/
Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Periodic_table
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1255

Post by PaulG »

NASA's Mars rover, Opportunity, has been pronounced dead.
NASA rover finally bites the dust on Mars after 15 years

The population of Mars has decreased by one. I don't want to appear insensitive but this came a bigger shock to me than most celebrity deaths in recent weeks. I thought it was going to keep going forever, but nothing ever does.
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1256

Post by GreatGrey »

I am not "someone upthread".
Trump needs to be smashed into some kind of inedible orange pâté.
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1257

Post by MN-Skeptic »

Barack Obama
‏Verified account @BarackObama

Don’t be sad it’s over, be proud it taught us so much. Congrats to all the men and women of @NASA on a @MarsRovers mission that beat all expectations, inspired a new generation of Americans, and demands we keep investing in science that pushes the boundaries of human knowledge.
9:10 PM - 13 Feb 2019
MAGA - Morons Are Governing America
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1258

Post by Lani »

Well, shit. Now I'm sad about Challenger AND I miss Obama :crying:
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1259

Post by Volkonski »

ITIF

Verified account

@ITIFdc
Follow Follow @ITIFdc
More
The U.S. government now invests less in R&D compared to the size of the economy than it has in more than 60 years. Learn more: https://itif.org/publications/2018/12/1 ... ic-decline
Image
Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1260

Post by RTH10260 »

Volkonski wrote: Sat Feb 16, 2019 4:51 pm
ITIF @ITIFdc

The U.S. government now invests less in R&D compared to the size of the economy than it has in more than 60 years. Learn more: https://itif.org/publications/2018/12/1 ... ic-decline
Image
Looks to me as if that spike was a reaction to the Cold War, developing the nuclear arsenal, plus the race to space. Are these numbers only work done by government agencies or does it also include contracts handed out to the industry?
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1261

Post by RTH10260 »

Radioactive Glass Beads May Tell the Terrible Tale of How the Fukushima Meltdown Unfolded
The microscopic particles unleashed by the plant’s explosions are also a potential environmental and health concern

By Andrea Thompson on March 11, 2019

On March 14 and 15, 2011, explosions unleashed invisible radioactive plumes from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, crippled three days earlier when the strongest recorded earthquake in Japan’s history triggered a massive tsunami. As the plumes drifted over the neighboring countryside, their contents—including radioactive cesium, a by-product of the plant’s fission reactions—fell to the ground and over the ocean.

What no one knew or expected was the fallout also contained bacteria-size glassy beads, with concentrations of radioactive cesium that were far higher than those in similar-size motes of tainted dust or dirt.

Since these particles were discovered in 2013, scientists have plucked them from soil samples and air filters throughout the contamination zone, including filters as far away as Tokyo. The beads could pose an under-recognized heath risk, researchers say, because they are tiny enough to be inhaled deep into the lungs—and their glassy makeup means they may not easily dissolve or erode. They also present an opportunity to conduct what one researcher called “nuclear forensics”: By analyzing the particles’ composition, scientists can piece together a clearer image of what happened during the white-hot violence inside the plant itself, and of the current condition of the debris in the three reactors that experienced meltdowns. This could help inform the strategy for cleaning up the ruins of the plant.

Researchers say a picture of the unusual beads is coming into focus against a backdrop of the Japanese public’s general nuclear wariness, and the government’s desire to put the Fukushima incident behind it—particularly with Tokyo poised to host the 2020 Olympics. “I think, unfortunately, the reaction to this discovery [of the beads] has been not very welcomed in Japan,” says Rod Ewing, a mineralogist and nuclear materials expert who co-directs the Center for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford University.


https://www.scientificamerican.com/arti ... -unfolded/
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1262

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer »

https://www.newscientist.com/article/21 ... bel-prize/
Karen Uhlenbeck is first woman to win prestigious maths Abel prize

The mathematician Karen Uhlenbeck has become the first woman to win the Abel prize, sometimes called the Nobel prize of mathematics. Uhlenbeck has been awarded the 6 million Norwegian kroner ($700,000) prize for her work in the fields of gauge theory and geometric analysis, which have been credited with far-reaching impact in both mathematics and physics.

Gauge theory underpins much of modern theoretical physics, and is integral to cutting-edge research in particle physics, general relativity and string theory. Her work laid the foundations for one of the major milestones of 20th century physics, the unification of two of the four fundamental forces of nature, electromagnetism and the weak nuclear force.

“The holy grail in physics has always been unification of forces,” says Jim Al-Khalili at the University of Surrey, UK, who gave a talk about Uhlenbeck’s prize-winning work today. “She has made a big contribution to the mathematics that allowed us to progress some considerable way along this path.”

Among her other meaningful contributions was her work on the calculus of variations, the study of how small changes in one quantity can help find the minimum or maximum value of another. A real-world example comes in blowing soap bubbles, which always adjust their shape so that their surface area is minimised. Predicting comparable structures in higher dimensions is enormously challenging, but Uhlenbeck’s work has greatly helped.
Sekrit Stuffs!
When she was awarded the American Mathematical Society’s Steele Prize for Seminal Contribution to Research in 2007, she blamed the culture of the mathematical community for the small numbers of women in leadership positions. In a self-deprecating summation of her award-winning work, she said “changing the culture is a momentous task in comparison to the other minor accomplishments I have mentioned.”
A 19th Amendment Centennial Moment:
August 26 was proclaimed Women's Equality Day in 1972 by Richard Nixon. August 26, 1920, was date the 19th Amendment was confirmed by the Secretary of State and became law.
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1263

Post by RTH10260 »

the scientists daily egg and bacon breakfast
Ancient bird that died 110-million-years-ago is found perfectly preserved with an egg inside its body
'Incredibly well preserved' sheds new light on the reproduction of birds
The specimen belongs to a group called the Enantiornithes - 'opposite birds'
These were common during the Cretaceous Period and lived with the dinosaurs
The egg shell consists of two layers instead of one as in normal healthy bird eggs, indicating the egg was retained too long inside the abdomen


By VICTORIA BELL FOR MAILONLINE
PUBLISHED: 10:00 GMT, 20 March 2019 | UPDATED: 13:33 GMT, 20 March 2019

The 'first ever' bird fossil with an egg preserved inside the body has been discovered.

Scientists say that the 'incredibly well preserved' find, dating back to the time of the dinosaurs, sheds new light on the reproduction of birds.

The specimen, representing a new species called Avimaia schweitzerae, was discovered in 110-million-year-old deposits in north western China.

It belongs to a group called the Enantiornithes - 'opposite birds' - which were common all around the world during the Cretaceous Period and lived alongside the dinosaurs.

Scientists discovered a further tragic secret - the egg may have killed the 'mother bird'.


https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech ... nside.html
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1264

Post by RTH10260 »

Hot tea may raise esophageal cancer risk
Published Friday 22 March 2019 By Ana Sandoiu Fact checked by Paula Field

New research, appearing in the International Journal of Cancer, finds an association between drinking tea at very high temperatures and the risk of developing esophageal cancer.

New research recommends letting tea cool down before drinking it.

According to the American Cancer Society, in 2019, there will be approximately 17,650 new cases of esophageal cancer and over 16,000 people will die from it.

In terms of a person's outlook, the Society estimate that approximately 20 percent of people with esophageal cancer go on to live for 5 years after the diagnosis.

Numerous factors may raise a person's risk of developing cancer of the esophagus. These include being older than 55, being male, having acid reflux, or eating a diet high in processed meats and low in fruits and vegetables.


https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/324771.php
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1265

Post by RTH10260 »

The deities have (the deity has) been working hard to obfuscate their influence
Found: A Quadrillion Ways for String Theory to Make Our Universe
Stemming from the “F-theory” branch of string theory, each solution replicates key features of the standard model of particle physics

By Anil Ananthaswamy on March 28, 2019

Physicists who have been roaming the “landscape” of string theory—the space of zillions and zillions of mathematical solutions of the theory, where each solution provides the kinds of equations physicists need to describe reality—have stumbled upon a subset of such equations that have the same set of matter particles as exists in our universe.

But this is no small subset: there are at least a quadrillion such solutions, making it the largest such set ever found in string theory.

According to string theory, all particles and fundamental forces arise from the vibrational states of tiny strings. For mathematical consistency, these strings vibrate in 10-dimensional spacetime. And for consistency with our familiar everyday experience of the universe, with three spatial dimensions and the dimension of time, the additional six dimensions are “compactified” so as to be undetectable.


https://www.scientificamerican.com/arti ... -universe/
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1266

Post by Sluffy1 »

66-million-year-old deathbed linked to dinosaur-killing meteor
Fossil site preserves animals killed within minutes of meteor impact.
Summary:
Paleontologists have found a fossil site in North Dakota that contains animals and plants killed and buried within an hour of the meteor impact that killed the dinosaurs 66 million years ago. This is the richest K-T boundary site ever found, incorporating insects, fish, mammals, dinosaurs and plants living at the end of the Cretaceous, mixed with tektites and rock created and scattered by the impact. The find shows that dinosaurs survived until the impact.
This unique, fossilized graveyard -- fish stacked one atop another and mixed in with burned tree trunks, conifer branches, dead mammals, mosasaur bones, insects, the partial carcass of a Triceratops, marine microorganisms called dinoflagellates and snail-like marine cephalopods called ammonites -- was unearthed by paleontologist Robert DePalma over the past six years in the Hell Creek Formation, not far from Bowman, North Dakota.
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2 ... 144223.htm
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1267

Post by AndyinPA »

https://www.theguardian.com/science/201 ... e-titicaca
An ancient ceremonial site described as exceptional has been discovered in the Andes by marine archaeologists, who recovered ritual offerings and the remains of slaughtered animals from a reef in the middle of Lake Titicaca.

The remarkable haul points to a history of highly charged ceremonies in which the elite of the region’s Tiwanaku state boated out to the reef and sacrificed young llamas, seemingly decorated for death, and made offerings of gold and exquisite stone miniatures to a ray-faced deity, as incense billowed from pottery pumas.

Tiwanaku state arose in the Lake Titicaca basin, around the border of modern Bolivia and Peru, between the 5th and 12th centuries AD, and went on to become one of the largest and most influential in the Andes. Formed by a natural fault that divides the Andes into two mountain ranges, the basin is a unique ecosystem with an “inland sea” set 3,800m above sea level. At the time of the Spanish conquest, the basin was home to an estimated 1 million people.
This is a beautiful part of the world. I saw my first wild llama here. :)
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1268

Post by Grumpy Old Guy »

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/03/scie ... omics.html

‘Predatory’ Scientific Publisher Is Hit With a $50 Million Judgment‘

by Gloria Navarro

I was able to read the article on the Google News App, with no paywall.
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1269

Post by RTH10260 »

BUT... But... but... we are apes, not?
New species of ancient human discovered in the Philippines
Dubbed Homo luzonensis, the species is one of the most important finds that will be out in the coming years, one scientist predicts.

BY MICHAEL GRESHKO AND MAYA WEI-HAAS
PUBLISHED APRIL 10, 2019

Humankind's tangled shrub of ancestry now has a new branch: Researchers in the Philippines announced today that they have discovered a species of ancient human previously unknown to science.

The small-bodied hominin, named Homo luzonensis, lived on the island of Luzon at least 50,000 to 67,000 years ago. The hominin—identified from a total of seven teeth and six small bones—hosts a patchwork of ancient and more advanced features. The landmark discovery, announced in Nature on Wednesday, makes Luzon the third Southeast Asian island in the last 15 years to bear signs of unexpectedly ancient human activity.

“For a long, long time, the Philippine islands [have] been more or less left [out]," says study coauthor and project leader Armand Mijares, an archaeologist at the University of the Philippines Diliman and a National Geographic grantee. But H. luzonensis flips the script, and it continues to challenge the outdated idea that the human line neatly progressed from less advanced to more advanced species.


https://www.nationalgeographic.com/scie ... uzonensis/
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1270

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer »

https://www.msn.com/en-in/news/techands ... ar-BBVN7RL
Scientists discover new state of matter

It was previously thought there were three states of matter: liquid, solid or gas.

Experts were unsure whether the new state - known as a "chain-melted state" - was its own distinct state of matter or simply atoms transitioning between two stages - whether solid, liquid or gas.

But powerful computer simulations and high-pressure and high-temperature tests carried out on metal potassium have now proven the former to be true.

Several other elements, including sodium, are also capable of existing in this new state, according to experts from the University of Edinburgh.
A 19th Amendment Centennial Moment:
August 26 was proclaimed Women's Equality Day in 1972 by Richard Nixon. August 26, 1920, was date the 19th Amendment was confirmed by the Secretary of State and became law.
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1271

Post by RTH10260 »

From Iranian Kurdish farmers kid to recognized Mathematician

A bio presented in the UK The Times
Caucher Birkar – from asylum seeker to Fields Medal winner at Cambridge
He grew up in a Kurdish peasant family in a war zone and arrived in Nottingham as a refugee – now Caucher Birkar has received the mathematics equivalent of the Nobel prize. By Tom Whipple

JUDE EDGINTON
The Times, April 6 2019, 12:01am.

Nineteen years ago, the mathematics department at the University of Nottingham received an email from an asylum seeker who wanted to talk to someone about algebraic geometry.

They replied and invited him in. So it was that, shortly afterwards, Caucher Birkar, the 21-year-old son of a Kurdish peasant family, stood in front of Ivan Fesenko, a professor at Nottingham, and began speaking in broken English. That was when his life changed.

The young Caucher Birkar did not usually roam the campus of Nottingham University.

Sometimes, when he wasn’t meeting maths professors, he would present his government-issued food vouchers at the local supermarket and the cashiers wouldn’t know what they were. They would hold them up to the light, or call a manager for assistance.

This was…

Remainder behind the paywall https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/cauc ... -xrz5t7ktj
Fields Medal winner Caucher Birkar: ‘Suddenly I have wings’
August 2, 2018, 8:45 am


Fields Medal winner, Kurd and British citizen with refugee status, Caucher Birkar, has dedicated himself to the multidimensional world of algebraic geometry and forms defined by equations.

“I’m so happy and excited. This means I can continue to study mathematics and do what I love,” he beamed, picking up the prestigious award at the opening ceremony of the ICM 2018 in Rio de Janeiro.

Now a researcher at Cambridge University, Birkar was born in 1978 in the Kurdish province of Marivan on the Iran/Iraq border. He follows in the centuries old footsteps of great mathematicians from the same region, Omar Khayyam (1048-1131) and Sharaf al-Din al-Tusi (1135-1213).

“It’s not easy to be a Kurd,” he explains. “We have a saying: The Kurdish have no friends but the mountainside. I am hoping this news will put a little smile on the lips of those 40 million people.”

Growing up in rural Iran, Birkar was taught mathematics by his elder brother. “My parents are farmers, my success in math is very unlikely.” He also thanked Kurdish culture in his official Medal video which, he says, helped him survive.

Since graduating from Tehran University, Birkar has devoted his efforts to the key problems in modern mathematics, such as minimal models, Fano varieties and singularities.


http://www.icm2018.org/wp/2018/08/02/fi ... ave-wings/
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1272

Post by RTH10260 »

MIT researchers discovered a way to move objects as heavy as a great white shark with your bare hands. Take a look.
Aria Bendix

  • MIT researchers have discovered a way to move objects as heavy as a great white shark with your bare hands.
  • One of the researchers, Brandon Clifford, recently debuted the technology at the TED 2019 conference.
  • The secret lies in harnessing the same methods used by ancient civilizations to build Stonehenge and Easter Island.
  • Clifford said his building blocks could potentially last for an eternity.


The megalithic structures at Stonehenge have vowed visitors for centuries, but scholars are still working to discover how they got there in the first place.

With an average weight of 25 tons per stone, it seems almost inconceivable that humans could have carried them on their own, but a group of MIT researchers has tapped into a hidden construction method that made it all possible.

In 2014, the researchers at design lab Matter Design began studying the way ancient civilizations built giant structures like Easter Island and the Egyptian pyramids. Using stones that have the right density and center of mass, they found, humans can actually move objects as heavy as a great white shark with their bare hands.

The lab's videos show people rotating mammoth stones that appear light as a feather, or assembling objects into staircases with no help from trucks or cranes.



https://www.businessinsider.com/mit-mov ... and-2019-4
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1273

Post by AndyinPA »

That's cool. I've always thought the ancient civilizations who did things that seem incomprehensible to us knew many things we wouldn't believe possible. They were much more attuned to the natural world than we are today.
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1274

Post by RTH10260 »

A bloodsucking ‘kissing bug’ was found in Delaware. Beware its poop.

By Alex Horton April 25 at 1:13 PM

It’s like “Sleeping Beauty” with a dose of nightmare fuel: A flat-bodied, six-legged insect moves toward you as you slumber, bound for the blood that surges around your eyes and lips. It crawls on your face. And the poop it leaves behind can be deadly.

The triatomine bug, also known as the notorious kissing bug, has been an obscure threat in the United States, with the highest density in Latin America and some Western states.

But the insect has found new prominence in Delaware, where health officials recently confirmed their first run-in with a kissing bug, making its known distribution across 28 states, according to researchers at Texas A&M University. The bugs have previously carved out territory from California to the Carolinas.

The insects may have been in Delaware already, but they are elusive and more difficult to trap, compared with mosquitoes and ticks, said Sarah Hamer, an associate professor and epidemiologist at Texas A&M. And that means it’s difficult to determine whether there is an expansion.


https://www.washingtonpost.com/health/2 ... are-march/
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1275

Post by Whatever4 »

RTH10260 wrote: Thu Apr 25, 2019 5:10 pm
A bloodsucking ‘kissing bug’ was found in Delaware. Beware its poop.

By Alex Horton April 25 at 1:13 PM

It’s like “Sleeping Beauty” with a dose of nightmare fuel: A flat-bodied, six-legged insect moves toward you as you slumber, bound for the blood that surges around your eyes and lips. It crawls on your face. And the poop it leaves behind can be deadly.

The triatomine bug, also known as the notorious kissing bug, has been an obscure threat in the United States, with the highest density in Latin America and some Western states.

But the insect has found new prominence in Delaware, where health officials recently confirmed their first run-in with a kissing bug, making its known distribution across 28 states, according to researchers at Texas A&M University. The bugs have previously carved out territory from California to the Carolinas.

The insects may have been in Delaware already, but they are elusive and more difficult to trap, compared with mosquitoes and ticks, said Sarah Hamer, an associate professor and epidemiologist at Texas A&M. And that means it’s difficult to determine whether there is an expansion.


https://www.washingtonpost.com/health/2 ... are-march/
Alrighty. :shock: Never visiting my brother-in-Law again.
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