Science, General Stuff

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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1226

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer »

Estiveo wrote: Thu Aug 30, 2018 12:47 pm I miss the hysterical days when the LHC was gonna create a black hole and destroy the Earth.
Good times.
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1227

Post by listeme »

Estiveo wrote: Thu Aug 30, 2018 12:47 pm I miss the hysterical days when the LHC was gonna create a black hole and destroy the Earth.
LOOK AT THE BAD TIMELINE WE'RE IN! :panic: :panic:
We're used to being told it's our fault that men don't listen to us.
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1228

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer »

https://www.livescience.com/63482-giant ... orida.html
There Be Dragons: 6-Foot-Long Lizard Terrifies Florida Family

A Florida family is afraid to use their swimming pool — and with good reason. Earlier this week, the family spotted a giant monitor lizard the size of an adult human lurking on their property.

The Lieberman family in Davie, Florida, discovered the uninvited visitor roaming around their backyard, Miami-Dade's Local 10 News ABC reported on Aug. 29. Parents Zack and Maria Lieberman told reporters that the lizard was so big, they feared for the safety of their two young children.

The enormous reptile — which was identified as an Asian water monitor (Varanus salvator) — measures approximately 6 feet (2 meters) long, according to Local 10 News. Over several days, the scaly invader made repeated appearances near the Lieberman home, but has thus far managed to evade capture by local trappers and wildlife authorities, the Miami Herald reported.
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1229

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer »

https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2018/03/ ... d-by-women
14 things you didn't know women invented

Throughout history, countless women have made invaluable contributions to the world, despite facing gender-based discrimination.

From the simple chocolate chip cookie to the first bulletproof fabric, INSIDER rounded up 14 inventions by women that you may not know about.
A 19th Amendment Centennial Moment:
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1230

Post by RTH10260 »

car stop-start or not --- fuel efficiency

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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1231

Post by RTH10260 »

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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1232

Post by RTH10260 »

Who would have thought that colouring your breakfast egg is so difficult?
Fossil Pigments Reveal Dinosaur Origin of Bird Egg Colors
The hues and patterns of modern bird eggs trace back to their dinosaurian ancestors

By Kate Wong on November 1, 2018

The eggshells of modern birds exhibit a spectacular array of rainbow hues—from butter yellow to blood red, palest aqua to darkest cyan. Some are spotted or speckled; others are blemish-free. How and when did the astonishing diversity of egg colors and patterns evolve? Among modern-day amniotes (the group that includes birds, reptiles and mammals), only birds produce colored eggs. The other egg layers make plain white ones. So the prevailing wisdom has been egg color is strictly a bird innovation—but new findings indicate that long before robin’s egg blue, there was Deinonychus’s egg blue.

In a paper published in this week in Nature researchers report on pigments found in fossilized eggshells from several dinosaur species. The work indicates the dazzling variety of colors and patterns in modern bird eggs traces back to a single evolutionary origin in nonavian dinosaurs. (Technically, birds are a subgroup of dinosaurs; hence the distinction between avian and nonavian.) The discovery adds to a growing body of evidence from fossil pigments that is revolutionizing dinosaur science.

The first hints egg color might have originated in nonavian dinosaurs came last year, when Jasmina Wiemann, a PhD student at Yale University, and her colleagues announced their discovery of the pigment responsible for blue-green egg color in fossilized eggshells of several oviraptorid dinosaurs from China. Oviraptorids were relatively small, bipedal dinosaurs with grasping hands, toothless beaks and feathers. The finding established that at least one group of nonavian dinosaurs had colored eggs, raising the question of whether birds inherited egg color from their nonavian dinosaur ancestors or the coloration evolved independently in birds and nonavian dinosaurs.


https://www.scientificamerican.com/arti ... gg-colors/
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1233

Post by Foggy »

Gt C = gigatons of carbon

.
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1234

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer »

Shark babies! Soothing video even with sharks! I didn't know Ireland had sharks.

https://www.independent.co.uk/environme ... 28831.html
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1235

Post by Whatever4 »

Tiredretiredlawyer wrote: Mon Nov 12, 2018 9:22 am Shark babies! Soothing video even with sharks! I didn't know Ireland had sharks.

https://www.independent.co.uk/environme ... 28831.html
Baby shark do do do do
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1236

Post by RTH10260 »

Passengers to get free cod liver oil pills ;)
Hurtigruten Announces It Will Fuel Cruise Ships With Dead Fish

Terri Colby Contributor

Hurtigruten's Nordlys is among the ships that will be powered by biogas.

Hurtigruten cruise ships will soon be powered with dead fish, the company announced Monday.

“What others see as a problem, we see as a resource and a solution,” the company said in a press release. “By introducing biogas as fuel for cruise ships, Hurtigruten will be the first cruise company to power ships with fossil-free fuel.”

The company said it will operate ships with liquefied biogas (LBG), which is a renewable gas produced from dead fish and other organic waste. Considered the most environmentally friendly fuel available, biogas is already being used in small parts of the transportation sector, particularly in buses, the company said. Biogas is different from biofuel produced from palm tree oil or from soil that could be used for growing crops.



https://www.forbes.com/sites/terricolby ... dead-fish/
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1237

Post by ZekeB »

Smacks of an Elon Musk invention.
Trump: Er hat eine größere Ente als ich.

Putin: Du bist kleiner als ich.
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1238

Post by RTH10260 »

ZekeB wrote: Tue Nov 20, 2018 9:11 am Smacks of an Elon Musk invention.
When the captain runs low on fuel passengers will be issued fishing rods :lol:
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1239

Post by RTH10260 »

More US children confirmed with paralyzing polio-like illness AFM
By Elizabeth Cohen, CNN
Updated 2151 GMT (0551 HKT) November 19, 2018

(CNN)More children have been diagnosed with acute flaccid myelitis, the polio-like paralyzing illness, according to numbers released Monday by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

There have now been 106 confirmed cases of AFM in 29 states this year, according to the CDC, an increase of 16 since last week.

There are also 167 possible cases of the illness, an increase of five from the previous week.

Since 2014, there have been 430 confirmed cases of the rare disease, and 90% have been children, according to the CDC.

AFM is a rare illness that affects the nervous system, especially the gray matter in the spinal cord, and causes muscle weakness and sudden onset of paralysis. There's a spectrum of how children can be affected: Some regain the use of their paralyzed limbs, while others are paralyzed from the neck down and can breathe only with the help of a ventilator.

There is no cure and no vaccine.

There is also no known cause.


https://edition.cnn.com/2018/11/19/heal ... index.html
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1240

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer »

Funny wordz. Thanks, Dr. Seuss!

https://www.miamiherald.com/news/nation ... 93840.html
What makes a word funny? Scientists say they’ve found the 10 silliest English words

Those words? Upchuck, bubby, boff, wriggly, yaps, giggle, cooch, guffaw, puffball and jiggly.

University of Alberta psychologist and study author Chris Westbury tried to identify the funniest words in English — but also tried to find out what made them so funny in the first place ([in] a new study called “Wriggly, squiffy, lummox, and boobs: What makes some words funny?” published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology in November.)

But its (a word's) structure also matters: If it looks more unexpected, we find it funnier. He called this the “snunkoople effect” in previous research on why people found some made-up words funnier than others. Dr. Seuss was a master of this, coining nonsensical words like sneedle, humpf-humpf-a-dumpfer and gootch.

For the study, participants were asked to rate how funny they found thousands of words, and the scientists were able to predict which ones they were most likely to find funny, according to a news release.

The predictions were based both on the word’s category (sex, bodily functions, insults, swear words, partying, and animals) and on how unexpected its composition was. For example, words with the long “o” sound, like in “poot” or “boobs” were funnier than others, according to the study. Double letters and words that end in “le” like “giggle” were also winners, according to the Toronto Star.
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1241

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer »

Moar word science with fancy scientific expressions like entropy and quantifiable theory of humor. Tek, are you there?

https://www.ualberta.ca/science/science ... ple-effect
How funny is this word? The 'snunkoople' effect

How do you quantify something as complex and personal as humour? University of Alberta researchers have developed a mathematical method of doing just that—and it might not be quite as personal as we think.

The idea for the study was born from earlier research in which test subjects with aphasia were asked to review letter strings and determine whether they were real words or not. Westbury began to notice a trend: participants would laugh when they heard some of the made-up non-words, like snunkoople.

It raised the question—how can a made-up word be inherently funny?

Westbury hypothesized that the answer lay in the word’s entropy—a mathematical measure of how ordered or predictable it is. Non-words like finglam, with uncommon letter combinations, are lower in entropy than other non-words like clester, which have more probable combinations of letters and therefore higher entropy.
A 19th Amendment Centennial Moment:
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1242

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer »

https://phys.org/news/2018-12-atoms-ele ... ctors.html
Atoms stand in for electrons in system for probing high-temperature superconductors

The Fermi-Hubbard model, :snippity: is just atoms or electrons hopping around on a lattice, and then, when they're on top of each other on the same lattice site, they can interact," he says. "But even though this is the simplest model of electrons interacting within these materials, there is no computer in the world that can solve it."

So instead, the researchers have built a physical emulator in which atoms act as stand-ins for the electrons. :snippity: When they tilt the box by applying a magnetic field gradient, they are able to observe the atoms as they move, and measure their speed, giving them the conductivity of the material, Zwierlein says.

The emulator allows the researchers to measure the transport, or motion, of the atoms' spin, and how this is affected by the interaction between atoms within the material. Measuring the transport of spin has not been possible in cuprates until now, as efforts have been inhibited by impurities within the materials and other complications, Zwierlein says.

By measuring the motion of spin, the researchers were able to investigate how it differs from that of charge.

"We found that large interactions can limit the available mechanisms which allow spins to move in the system, so that spin flow slows down significantly as the interactions between atoms increase," Nichols says.
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1243

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer »

I didn't know I didn't know. Can you say "Maohokite"?

https://phys.org/news/2018-12-scientist ... neral.html
Scientists discover possible mantle mineral

Scientists long believed that Earth's lower mantle was composed of Bridgmanite (Mg,Fe)SiO3 and magnesiowüstite (Mg,Fe)O, in which Fe2+ dwells. This view changed when experiments showed that Fe2+ simply can't exist at the pressure and temperature of the lower mantle. What is present is Fe3+. The two phases (Mg,Fe)SiO3 and (Mg,Fe)O both shed Fe2+ and, in turn, MgSiO3 and MgO remain. However, what mineral hosts Fe3+ had remained unknown.

Now, scientists have a possible answer: Maohokite, a newly discovered high-pressure mineral. It may be what composes the Earth's lower mantle along with Bridgmanite MgSiO3 and magnesiowüstite MgO. The study reporting this new mineral was published in Meteoritics & Planetary Science.

Maohokite was discovered by Chen Ming's team from the Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and SHU Jinfu from the Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research. The mineral was named after Hokwang Mao, in honor of his great contribution to high-pressure research.

Natural minerals can be divided into two types: low-pressure minerals and high-pressure minerals, depending on their formation pressures. The pressure and temperature required for the formation of high-pressure minerals can only be provided by the environment of the mantle or the hypervelocity collision between celestial bodies.

Maohokite is the second case. It was found in shock-metamorphosed rocks from the Xiuyan impact crater in China.
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1244

Post by RTH10260 »

Watch the first plane with no moving parts take flight – video

The flight represents a breakthrough in 'ionic wind' technology, which uses a powerful electric field to generate charged nitrogen ions, which are then expelled from the back of the aircraft, generating thrust. The plane has a propulsion system that is entirely electrically powered, almost silent, and with a thrust-to-power ratio comparable to that achieved by conventional systems such as jet engines

https:// www.theguardian.com/science/video/2018/ ... ight-video
Video from other source with explanation
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1245

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer »

Crossposting from Art, I know it:

https://arstechnica.com/science/2018/12 ... hysicists/
Study: modern masters like Jackson Pollock were “intuitive physicists”
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1246

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Largest Known Prime Number: 282,589,933-1

BLOWING ROCK, NC, December 21, 2018 -- The Great Internet Mersenne Prime Search (GIMPS) has discovered the largest known prime number, 282,589,933-1, having 24,862,048 digits. A computer volunteered by Patrick Laroche made the find on December 7, 2018. Patrick is one of thousands of volunteers using free GIMPS software available at www.mersenne.org/download/.

The new prime number, also known as M82589933, is calculated by multiplying together 82,589,933 twos, and then subtracting one. It is more than one and a half million digits larger than the previous record prime number, in a special class of extremely rare prime numbers known as Mersenne primes. It is only the 51st known Mersenne prime ever discovered, each increasingly more difficult to find. Mersenne primes were named for the French monk Marin Mersenne, who studied these numbers more than 350 years ago. GIMPS, founded in 1996, has discovered the last 17 Mersenne primes. Volunteers download a free program to search for these primes, with a cash award offered to anyone lucky enough to find a new prime. Prof. Chris Caldwell maintains an authoritative web site on the largest known primes, and has an excellent history of Mersenne primes.

A Lucky Find in a Lucky Streak

Patrick Laroche is a 35 year old I.T. professional living in Ocala, Florida. For many years, Patrick had used GIMPS software as a free "stress test" for his computer builds. Recently, he started prime hunting on his media server to "give back" to the project. After less than 4 months and on just his fourth try, he discovered the new prime number. By way of comparison, some GIMPS participants have searched for more than 20 years with tens of thousands of attempts but no success. Thus proving that even the "little guy" can compete against those with lots of computing resources.

GIMPS has also been extremely lucky over the last 15 years. This is GIMPS' 12th prime discovery between 220000000-1 and 285000000-1, triple the expected number of new primes. One reason to search for new primes is to match actual results with expected results. This anomaly is not necessarily evidence that existing theories on the distribution of Mersenne primes is incorrect. However, if the trend continues it may be worth further investigation.


https://www.mersenne.org/primes/?press=M82589933
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1247

Post by Volkonski »

TicToc by Bloomberg

Verified account

@tictoc
Jan 23
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The Massachusetts Institute of Technology is committing $1,000,000,000 to create a new college for computing and AI
Wow! :thumbs:
Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1248

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A Simple Camera and an Algorithm Let You See around Corners
A preliminary study shows how it might be possible one day to use a smartphone app to look around a bend without the help of a mirror

By Jeff Hecht on January 23, 2019

A Simple Camera and an Algorithm Let You See around Corners

Over the past decade optics researchers have shown mirrors are not necessary to see objects outside the line of sight. That success, though, required exotic lasers firing pulses lasting less than a trillionth of a second in duration and high-performance sensors able to detect single photons. Now a team at Boston University has shown an algorithm and an ordinary digital camera can also look around corners without mirrors—and do so without such costly and complex equipment.



https://www.scientificamerican.com/arti ... d-corners/
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1249

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer »

https://www.bing.com/News/MSNOverlay?ur ... M%3dCATEBS
Men's Brains 3 Years 'Older' Than Women's of Same Age

The researchers carried out their study by analyzing PET scans of 205 people with healthy brains ages 20 to 82 in order to use a sample representative of the human adult lifespan. The participants were taking part in six studies across the Washington University School of Medicine.

They created algorithms to calculate the metabolic ages of the participants, which they compared to their chronological ages. They found women’s brains were more youthful as young adults, and the trend continued into old age.

Pointing to existing research, the team surmised that women’s brains could be free from neurocognitive decline for longer for a number of reasons. One explanation could be that the genes involved in energy use could be less impacted by age in women. Or that women don’t experience the same loss of blood flow in the brain after puberty than men. Studies in rodents, meanwhile, have suggested estrogen could make the brain more adaptable to change.

Further research is needed to uncover whether the neoteny of women helps them to avoid neurodegenerative diseases.
:-
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1250

Post by Foggy »

If women have young brains, how come they can't think like normal people? :think:
Sekrit Stuffs!
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