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ZekeB
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#451

Post by ZekeB »

I was 42 when I had my first bout with shingles. I had another 3 years later and another 5 years after that. I haven't had any problems since. I did get a shot during a physical when I was 60. My HMO kicked and screamed. They didn't want to spend the $$. I insisted and I got my way.



Where they came up with this "after age 60" rule baffles me.
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#452

Post by GreatGrey »

So between this thread and badgering by HausFrau I went up to Walgreens to get a Shingles Vaccination.



My insurance company hasn't contracted with Walgreens, so no luck.



Gonna have to try the grocery store.
I am not "someone upthread".
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#453

Post by ZekeB »

Call your insurance company and ask where to go so they could cover it.
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vic
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#454

Post by vic »

I believe I've actually had the shingles vaccine twice. The first time my doctor offered it (included in my visit co-pay, IIRC, thanks Kaiser) I gladly took it since a neighbor had suffered about 6 months of pain due to shingles the year before.



At my next visit, the doctor offered it again. Apparently, the nurse had forgotten to record it on my chart. The doctor didn't trust my memory, so I had the shot again. Better safe than sorry.



One note, though. The vaccine is only about 50% effective:

http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd-vac/shi ... nation.htm





In a clinical trial involving more than 38,000 adults 60 years of age or older, the vaccine reduced the overall incidence of shingles by 51% and the incidence of PHN by 67%. The efficacy of the vaccine in preventing shingles was higher in the younger age group (60-69 years; vaccine efficacy was 64%) than in the older age group (older than 70 years; vaccine efficacy was 38%).



From the Google: PHN - Postherpetic neuralgia is pain that lasts for more than a month after a shingles infection occurred. The pain may last for months or years.

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#455

Post by Volkonski »

In addition to my new smartphone (which seems like a thing out of science fiction) I have had another recent reminder of the advance of technology. Mrs. V. and I went in yesterday for the 1st lab test portion of our annual physicals. Gone were the scales, now there is a device that you stand on whilst holding a sensor in you hands that weighs you, calculates your body mass index and measures your heart rate. Gone are the oral thermometers, now they touch a sensor to your forehead. All your data is wirelessly sent to your file. They now do DNA tests to determine your susceptibility to diseases/disorders and to determine which drugs are likely to be most effective in your body.



Also new this year is that we have a direct online portal to our doctor where we can see our entire medical history plus new test results as soon as they are available. We can also communicate with the doctor via the portal. I just looked at mine, Volkonski by the numbers with trends over time and advice about potentially useful procedures. (Hm, nearly time to have my tires rotated. ;) )



Next week we go in for ultrasounds of our arteries and veins.
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#456

Post by Foggy »

We're putting my younger son Alex Bob into the same school as his older brother William next year. Southeast Raleigh Magnet High School, aka The Center for Leadership & Technology. Having two vastly different school schedules is the pits, but it's only for one year. William is already enjoying Christmas vacation; Alex Bob is in school today and tomorrow.



SRMHS has three 'academies' where you can get some really advanced classes -- Information Tech, Biotech, and Engineering.



William is in the Engineering Academy. Alex Bob is leaning towards Biotech now. 'Course in five years all the stuff Perfesser Volkonski just wroted about will seem about as primitive as aboriginal witch doctors dancing around and mutterin' chants and so forth ...
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#457

Post by Volkonski »

Missed this when it first came out.

http://sci-ence.org/red-flags2/
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#458

Post by Slarti the White »

Great chart Volkonski, but I have a couple of caveats:



1. Simple electric/magnetic fields can be of critical importance to healing in the case of messy compound fractures where the bone is shattered. See The Body Electric.



2. As I understand it, "chi" has been used in controlled circumstances as a surgical anesthetic (i.e. someone had surgery at the University of Beijing with only a chi kung master laying hands on them instead of drugs). I'm in the early stages of moving so I don't have access to the book where I read this to get a reference.



Peer reviewed, documented and repeatable results tend to trump most of those warning signs.
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#459

Post by esseff44 »

"How Headlines Change the Way We Think"



No surprises that headlines change the way we think but maybe even more that we thought.

http://www.newyorker.com/science/maria- ... NjA0MTM1S0

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#460

Post by Sam the Centipede »

Great chart Volkonski, but I have a couple of caveats: 1. Simple electric/magnetic fields can be of critical importance to healing in the case of messy compound fractures where the bone is shattered. See The Body Electric.Are you sure that's good science? To quote from the Amazon blurb: "The Body Electric explores new pathways in our understanding of evolution, acupuncture, psychic phenomena, and healing." Acupuncture is ridiculous nonsense, psychic phenomena are hooey, and I see no connection with evolution except in terms of the evolution of whatever mechanisms the guy is talking about.I'm not saying there are no electrical processes or sensitivity in the human body (of course nerves use electro-chemical means to transmit impulses based on sodium and potassium ions whizzing through membranes, and some animals use electricity (electric eels of course) and some sense magnetic fields (migratory birds), but here I take the Bayesian approach that if the book's publisher boasts about nonsense contained therein, then other information in the book can be assumed untrustworthy without stronger evidence to suggest otherwise than would be required from a more respectable source.It's a corollary of the "extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence" aphorism, except this is about the reliability of the evidence. I don't trust anything from anybody who makes claims about quack medicine.

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#461

Post by Slarti the White »

Aaarrrgghh! Another book that isn't at my fingertips. I hate moving.



While I consider myself a hard-core Bayesian, I don't need to rely on the blurb---I read the book. What the authors have to say about low level electrical fields and the body is fascinating... and scientific. It is based on the author's observations as a doctor at a VA hospital (Bethesda, I believe) and research on species capable of regeneration (salamanders mostly). I'll try and remember to give you a better book report when I get my hands on it again. All I can say is that if I had one of my bones broken into many pieces I would damn well make sure that my doctors had read this book.
"Strategy without tactics is the slowest route to victory. Tactics without strategy is the noise before defeat."
---Sun Tzu (quoting Thomas Jefferson)
nam-myoho-renge-kyo---Thomas Jefferson (quoting Slartibartfast)

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#462

Post by Volkonski »

Captive breeding programs in zoos and ranches may be the only hope for rhino survival. There can be no question that humans are responsible for the decline of the rhinos which are poached for their horns which are used in east Asia for quack medicine. :x





The five living species of rhino, along with the several species of tapir and horse (which include the zebras and asses), are members of the great mammalian order of odd-toed ungulates, or Perissodactyla. Perissodactylswere formerly much more species rich; today, most ungulates (hoofed mammals) are even-toed, members of the Artiodactyla, which includes cattle, deer, antelope, sheep, goats, pigs, etc.– the dominant large land herbivores of our world. Of those perissodactyls still with us, the rhinos have suffered the most at the hand of man, and all five species have been or are critically endangered.



The most endangered of rhinos is the northern white rhino (Ceratotherium simum cottoni) of central Africa, a subspecies of the white rhino, and its condition became extremely precarious last Sunday when the San Diego Zoo’s male northern white rhino, Angalifu, died at the age of 44 from old-age related ailments. There is now only one male northern white rhino left alive, along with 4 females (singleton females at San Diego and in the Czech Republic, all the rest, including the male, in Kenya).



http://whyevolutionistrue.wordpress.com ... the-rhino/
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#463

Post by Volkonski »

The Oxford University Press has just published-



"The Eye: A Very Short Introduction"



by neurobiologist Michael F. Land.



It is a short (128 pages) introduction to eyes and their evolution. It is a bargain at only $5.19 for the Kindle version. Land's longer book Animal Eyes would set you back $35.
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#464

Post by Foggy »

SpaceX Launches Falcon 9 Rocket, Misses Landing





SpaceX launched a Falcon 9 rocket with a Dragon cargo capsule, but it's unprecedented attempt to land the uncrewed rocket's first stage at sea ended with a crash.



The primary goal of Saturday's launch was to send more than 5,000 pounds (2,300 kilograms) of supplies, equipment and experiments to the International Space Station aboard the Dragon. That part of the mission unfolded flawlessly.



After the Dragon and the Falcon's second stage separated and went on their way, the 14-story-tall first stage was programmed to try flying itself back to an "autonomous spaceport drone ship" sitting about 200 miles off Florida's Atlantic coast. SpaceX's billionaire founder, Elon Musk, said in a Twitter update that the stage "made it to drone spaceport ship, but landed hard."



"Close, but no cigar this time," he said.







Moar at teh linky!





Hopefully, this will blossom into a snowball. :-?
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#465

Post by Foggy »

Space-Time Warp Hides Massive Pulsar From View After It Tips Into A 'Gravitational Well'



A warp in the fabric of space-time has caused a pulsar in a binary star system about 25,000 light-years from Earth to vanish, at least for now, according to a team of scientists who had been monitoring the star system for over five years. The scientists reportedly estimate that the pulsar would be visible again in another 160 years after it emerges from the “gravitational well” created by its mass and rotation.



Pulsars are rotating neutron stars, which are immensely dense stars created as a result of a massive star collapsing in on itself. As a pulsar rotates, it emits high-energy radiation, similar to lighthouse casting beams of light. If this beam of high-energy radiation is pointed toward the Earth, these high-energy pulses can be detected using radio telescopes.



The specimen, under observation, is part of a binary star system, named J1906, which was discovered in 2004 using the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico. Researchers had been studying the pulsar, which was found to have an orbital period of four hours, to determine what kind of a companion star it orbits. That is, until the pulsar vanished unexpectedly.



“These two stars each weigh more than the sun, but are still over 100 times closer together than the Earth is to the sun,” Ingrid Stairs from the University of British Columbia, Canada, and a co-author of the findings published in The Astrophysical Journal, reportedly said. “The resulting extreme gravity causes many remarkable effects.”





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#466

Post by Slarti the White »

I'd really like to know how their prediction that the pulsar will wobble back into view in 160 years turns out. If it's right, it's a pretty impressive prediction.
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#467

Post by Foggy »

Let's stick around and find out. I bet a bunch of interesting stuff is going to happen in the next 160 years. I don't want to miss a minute of it.
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#468

Post by Slarti the White »

I'm down with that plan.
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#469

Post by magdalen77 »

I was told by a doctor about 10 years ago that I was going to live to 104, but I'll hang around for another 110 (give or take).

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#470

Post by ducktape »

I went to visit my old doctor, now retired, a couple of days ago. The subject of assisted living came up when I told that I was trying to help people stay empowered and, when they wanted, "aging in place.""Well, those assisted living places can be nice," she said. "No responsibility -- they do everything and you can just do what you want. My kids are in one and they love it.""But you're not," I said."No, I like my home," he said. "Maybe in ten years ..."She's 97.

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#471

Post by magdalen77 »

I went to visit my old doctor, now retired, a couple of days ago. The subject of assisted living came up when I told that I was trying to help people stay empowered and, when they wanted, "aging in place.""Well, those assisted living places can be nice," she said. "No responsibility -- they do everything and you can just do what you want. My kids are in one and they love it.""But you're not," I said."No, I like my home," he said. "Maybe in ten years ..."She's 97.



That's a good attitude to have.

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#472

Post by Slarti the White »









Great chart Volkonski, but I have a couple of caveats:



1. Simple electric/magnetic fields can be of critical importance to healing in the case of messy compound fractures where the bone is shattered. See The Body Electric.



Are you sure that's good science? To quote from the Amazon blurb: "The Body Electric explores new pathways in our understanding of evolution, acupuncture, psychic phenomena, and healing." Acupuncture is ridiculous nonsense, psychic phenomena are hooey, and I see no connection with evolution except in terms of the evolution of whatever mechanisms the guy is talking about.

I'm not saying there are no electrical processes or sensitivity in the human body (of course nerves use electro-chemical means to transmit impulses based on sodium and potassium ions whizzing through membranes, and some animals use electricity (electric eels of course) and some sense magnetic fields (migratory birds), but here I take the Bayesian approach that if the book's publisher boasts about nonsense contained therein, then other information in the book can be assumed untrustworthy without stronger evidence to suggest otherwise than would be required from a more respectable source.

It's a corollary of the "extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence" aphorism, except this is about the reliability of the evidence. I don't trust anything from anybody who makes claims about quack medicine.





Sam,



I finally got my hands on The Body Electric and have reconfirmed my opinion that it is science (if controversial), not woo. From the back of the book:



The Body Electric tells the fascinating story of our bioelectric selves. Robert O. Becker, a pioneer in the field of regeneration and its relationship to electrical currents in living things, challenges the established mechanistic understanding of the body. He found clues to the healing process in the long-discarded theory of the 18th-century vitalists that electricity is vital to the life process. But as exciting as Becker's discoveries are, pointing to the day when human limbs, spinal cords, and organs may be regenerated after they have been damaged, equally fascinating is the story of Becker's struggle to do such original work. As his understanding of the effects of electrical forces led him to alert the public to their possible effects on the environment, the establishment erected an even higher wall of resistance. The Body Electric also explores new pathways in our understanding of evolution, acupuncture, psychic phenomena, and cancer, all within the framework of Dr. Becker's colorful and controversial career.







It's been a long time since I read it, but the things mentioned in the last sentence are a small fraction of the book and far from its focus.
"Strategy without tactics is the slowest route to victory. Tactics without strategy is the noise before defeat."
---Sun Tzu (quoting Thomas Jefferson)
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#473

Post by realist »







Flexible spinal cord implants will let paralyzed people walk

Doctors dream of helping the paralzyed walk through implants that stimulate their spinal cords, but current technology makes that impossible; these stiff, unnatural gadgets usually end up damaging or inflaming nervous tissue over time. Swiss researchers may have just solved this problem once and for all, though. Their bendy e-Dura implant combines flexible electrodes (made of platinum and silicon microbeads), cracked gold electronic tracks and fluidic microchannels to deliver both electrical impulses and chemicals while mimicking the spine's movements and avoiding friction. Paralyzed rats in lab tests could both walk again after a few weeks and keep wearing their implants after two months.



It'll be a while before e-Dura implants go into human field trials and reach hospitals. With that said, scientists believe the technology's potential extends well beyond overcoming spinal cord injuries. It could treat epilepsy and Parkinson's disease, not to mention reduce chronic pain for numerous conditions. This isn't a cure, strictly speaking, but it would let many people regain mobility (and some semblance of a normal life) without complications or having to resort to external devices like exoskeletons.







http://www.engadget.com/2015/01/11/flex ... d-implant/

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#474

Post by Volkonski »

Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace

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#475

Post by RoadScholar »

Acupuncture is most definitely NOT "ridiculous nonsense." It has scientifically-verified uses, and it has given me relief from muscle spasms more often than I care to remember. It has been used to block pain in procedures where the patient must remain awake.

Otherwise, I agree. And there are woo-susceptible clods who claim it can cure everything including cancer. That IS ridiculous nonsense, but no conscientious practitioner would make such a claim.
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