Innovative Architecture, Infrastructure & Design

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maydijo
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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#176

Post by maydijo » Sun Dec 17, 2017 2:48 pm

Addie wrote:
Sat Dec 16, 2017 4:38 pm
Would you like to be a tree? I would love to be a tree. :daydream:

Independent
Bios Urn: the startup that lets you grow a tree from human ashes ...

Junker buried his father in a Bios Urn, a biodegradable urn designed to grow trees from ashes. Since 2012, brothers Roger and Gerard Moliné have sold 100,000 Bios Urns to people looking to turn the ashes of loved ones or pets into trees all over the world from their head office in Barcelona, Spain.

The urn arrives in the post as a cardboard tube made of two separate cones, one for holding ashes and another containing a soil mix and the seed of choice, whether that is a maple, oak, pine or any other tree or bush. The buyer then decants the ashes into the bottom cone and buries the two parts together. That’s easy for people like Junker, who has 200 acres of family-owned land in Vermont. He dreams of one day planting all his family and pets in the same field so he can always spend time with them.

Many people don’t have any land to return family members to after death. So the Moliné brothers have been working on a digital plant pot for the urn, which allows families to keep the plant near them and monitor its progress using an app.

The Bios Incube, advertised as “the world’s first incubator for the afterlife”, was funded by a successful Kickstarter campaign, raising €73,671 (£65,890) in March 2016. The 356 backers each get a tree planted in their honour (ashes not included). More than 50 of them contributed €350 or more to get an early bird Bios Incube at a special price (they retail from €450).
Too much pressure. I kill everything I plant. Imagine the emotional burden of killing my grandma after she's already dead!



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Addie
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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#177

Post by Addie » Mon Jan 29, 2018 2:33 pm

Mental Floss: This Footbridge in the Netherlands Transforms With Rising Waters

Twenty-six percent of the Netherlands lies below sea level, making the country vulnerable to floods. This is especially true of the 2000-year-old city of Nijmegen, which straddles the Waal river. The town is home to many examples of flood-resistant infrastructure, but one footbridge there works a bit differently. Instead of building it around the threat of rising waters, the designers of the Zalige bridge made a crossing that changes along with its environment, according to Co.Design.





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Addie
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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#178

Post by Addie » Sun Mar 11, 2018 12:27 pm

Boston Globe
Over the clogged streets of Mexico City, gondolas fly free ...

Known as the Mexicable, the 3-mile, $90 million gondola system opened to great fanfare in late 2016, an ambitious effort to improve public transportation in this suburb of more than 1.6 million. Initially met with some doubts, it has since provided more than 5.5 million rides, with about 20,000 passenger trips on a typical weekday. It has also drawn praise for giving low-income workers better access to public transportation.



As Boston considers a proposal that has drawn sharp skepticism in some corners, Ecatepec provides a case study in whether the unorthodox idea can be a viable option in a city’s perpetual battle against traffic.

“They didn’t have enough roads to relieve the traffic,” said Victor Jasso, who directs the Mexicable. “There was no space for expanding the roadway. Making [bus-only lanes] was impossible. And building a subway? Also not a chance.”

Dwarfing Boston with a metro population of more than 20 million people, Mexico City has some of the worst traffic in the world. But Boston’s is bad and getting worse, and a team of developers and engineers pitching a similar gondola system in the fast-growing Seaport District believe the basic concept could also apply in the neighborhood.

While there are considerable differences between the Mexicable and the Seaport plan, they share a fundamental goal — running transit high above busy streets. That’s a marked departure from how gondolas have historically been used: climbing steep hills, as in Portland, Ore.; crossing bodies of water, like the Roosevelt Island Tram in New York City; or giving tourists a new perspective on a city, as they do in London.


A photo illustration shows what a cableway might look like over Summer Street.


Miriam Martinez and her children used the Mexicable to beat the traffic.


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TollandRCR
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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#179

Post by TollandRCR » Sun Mar 11, 2018 2:22 pm

I have seen monorail systems serving regions of villages and towns in Japan. For almost all of the area a single rail carries cars in opposite directions. Double rails are used at stations to make this possible. I have the impression that these systems are fully automated. The single rail reduces the footprint of the monorail in congested areas. Better than a swaying gondola with more capacity. Can even serve small delivery needs.


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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#180

Post by RTH10260 » Sun Mar 11, 2018 5:22 pm

Addie wrote:
Sun Mar 11, 2018 12:27 pm
Boston Globe
Over the clogged streets of Mexico City, gondolas fly free ...

:snippity:
:twisted: Fake News! Gavin did not report such an exclusive feature :!:

;)



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Chilidog
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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#181

Post by Chilidog » Sat Mar 17, 2018 11:10 am

The thread about the horrific bridge construction accident in Florida made me want to post this.

I have been driving on Chicago's Lake Shore Drive a lot lately. There are three new pedestrian bridges over the road and nearby METRA tracks. One is completed and open, the other two are in various stages of construction.

the one that is open is gorgeous.

Image



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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#182

Post by Addie » Sat Apr 14, 2018 11:10 am

The Guardian
World's first electrified road for charging vehicles opens in Sweden ...

About 2km (1.2 miles) of electric rail has been embedded in a public road near Stockholm, but the government’s roads agency has already drafted a national map for future expansion.

Sweden’s target of achieving independence from fossil fuel by 2030 requires a 70% reduction in the transport sector.

The technology behind the electrification of the road linking Stockholm Arlanda airport to a logistics site outside the capital city aims to solve the thorny problems of keeping electric vehicles charged, and the manufacture of their batteries affordable.

The electrified road is divided into 50m sections, with an individual section powered only when a vehicle is above it.

When a vehicle stops, the current is disconnected. The system is able to calculate the vehicle’s energy consumption, which enables electricity costs to be debited per vehicle and user.

Energy is transferred from two tracks of rail in the road via a movable arm attached to the bottom of a vehicle. The design is not dissimilar to that of a Scalextric track, although should the vehicle overtake, the arm is automatically disconnected.


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Addie
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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#183

Post by Addie » Sat Apr 14, 2018 11:13 am

That does look beautiful, Chili.
Chilidog wrote:
Sat Mar 17, 2018 11:10 am

I have been driving on Chicago's Lake Shore Drive a lot lately. There are three new pedestrian bridges over the road and nearby METRA tracks. One is completed and open, the other two are in various stages of construction.

the one that is open is gorgeous.


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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#184

Post by Chilidog » Sat Apr 14, 2018 2:07 pm

Addie wrote:
Sat Apr 14, 2018 11:13 am
That does look beautiful, Chili.
Chilidog wrote:
Sat Mar 17, 2018 11:10 am

I have been driving on Chicago's Lake Shore Drive a lot lately. There are three new pedestrian bridges over the road and nearby METRA tracks. One is completed and open, the other two are in various stages of construction.

the one that is open is gorgeous.
What is really cool is that they arranged the lights on the handrails so that if you approach from the north at night, in one of the center lanes of LSD, the light and dark sections make a very distinctive pattern instantly familiar to any chicagoan

Image



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TollandRCR
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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#185

Post by TollandRCR » Tue Apr 17, 2018 9:23 pm

That pedestrian bridge in Chicago is far more attractive than the failed concrete montrosity in Miami. Lighter, too.


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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#186

Post by Addie » Fri Jun 01, 2018 2:57 pm



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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#187

Post by AndyinPA » Fri Jun 01, 2018 3:17 pm

Very cool!

I am sure that there are many people out there who have innovative, and sometimes simple, ideas for helping the planet, globally or locally. Not enough of them get the chance.



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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#188

Post by Addie » Thu Aug 09, 2018 10:53 am

Completely fascinating article. I hope Fogbowsers take the time to read it in full. The story could have used more pix.

The New Yorker
The Unrepeatable Architectural Moment of Yugoslavia’s “Concrete Utopia”


Monument to the Uprising of the People of Kordun and Banija, in Petrova Gora, Croatia. Abstract, boldly expressive memorials once dotted the Yugoslavian countryside by the thousands. Photograph by Valentin Jeck / MoMA

...And so Yugoslavia was this strange communist state with shopping centers, decent living standards, relative ease of travel, and British comedy on the TV. That is not to say that it was a utopia—it would eventually collapse under the weight of its contradictions and endemic ethnic divisions—but it was not what your average American thinks of as “communism.” That this “third way” socialism survived into the nineteen-eighties probably had something to do with the fact that it was widely embraced, rather than imposed by the Soviets, as it was elsewhere in Eastern Europe, in part because the Yugoslav Partisans had managed to liberate the country from the Nazis without much need for the Red Army.

That military achievement, at the cost of a million dead, is also one of the reasons that Yugoslavian architecture has started to attract wider attention. In 2013, photographs of spomenici—memorials, mostly commemorating the struggle against Fascism—started to spread like wildfire across the architecture-loving Internet. These abstract, boldly expressive monuments, thousands of which once dotted the Yugoslavian countryside, were received with wide eyes, as if a lost civilization had suddenly yielded a new architectural language. And it is true that many of the country’s great talents, including the artist Vojin Bakić and the architect Bogdan Bogdanović, were engrossed in creating these extraordinary landscape works. No wonder they were exoticized. But they were also explicitly an iconography of nation-building, points of collective pride and solidarity. More instructive to today’s situation—when architecture has been thoroughly privatized—is the architecture of self-management.

In the words of Edvard Kardelj, the chief theorist of self-management, the system offered a “profound cultural and ethical revolution . . . a transformation of the complete consciousness of the working man.” Bearing in mind that Yugoslavia had been an undeveloped, largely agrarian economy before the war, the task of rebuilding and modernizing was not just physical but mental. One could not rely on the workers to self-manage without educating them. And so one of the key strands of the rebuilding effort was schools, from kindergartens to so-called worker universities. By 1959, there were a hundred and twenty-nine such universities, the finest of which was in the heart of New Zagreb, in the Croatian capital. Designed by Radovan Nikšić and Ninoslav Kučan, it was a paragon of modernist style. But, more than that, it provided a dense set of activities in flexible spaces with fluid circulation—there was nothing rigid or dogmatic about it. Tito was sufficiently impressed that, in 1963, once relations with the U.S.S.R. had eased a little, he took Khrushchev there to show off the achievements of his non-Soviet socialism. (The Russian was impervious: “The workers should stay at the factory bench,” he countered.)

This push toward education included cultural centers and museums. Some of these were brilliantly original interpretations of these building types, such as the wonderful Museum of Contemporary Art in Belgrade, designed by Ivan Antić and Ivanka Raspopović. Composed of a grid of crystalline forms with angular skylights, it was a striking symbol of the country’s belief in modern art and architecture. Early on, and especially after Yugoslavia’s expulsion from Cominform, in 1948, the authorities had rejected the socialist realism espoused in the U.S.S.R. as unfit to represent a progressive society. The current of European and American modernism ran deep, and Yugoslavian architects, many of whom were trained in the West, proved that they could make an original contribution to that discourse. In 1958, Vjenceslav Richter flaunted this unique brand of modernism on the world stage with his design for the Yugoslav Pavilion, at the Brussels World’s Fair. This intricate structure was an exercise in elegance and clarity (and is still in use today, as a college in a small Belgian town).

Yugoslavia’s divergence from the Iron Curtain’s architectural culture was remarked on by Harrison Salisbury, a former Moscow bureau chief for the Times who was on a temporary stint in the Balkans, in 1957. “To a visitor from eastern Europe a stroll in Belgrade is like walking out of a grim barracks of ferro-concrete into a light and imaginative world of pastel buildings, ‘flying saucers’ and Italianate patios,” he wrote. “Nowhere is Yugoslavia’s break with the drab monotony and tasteless gingerbread of ‘socialist realism’ more dramatic than in the graceful office buildings, apartment houses and public structures that have replaced the rubble of World War II.” ...


The Braće Borozan building block, in Split, Croatia. Individualism, rather than uniformity, was encouraged in Yugoslavian mass-housing projects. Photograph by Valentin Jeck / MoMA
Talking heads from the MOMA:



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Addie
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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#189

Post by Addie » Thu Aug 16, 2018 8:59 am

This young lady is a tad self-congratulatory, but she did a good job on this modern tiny house. :thumbs:



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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#190

Post by AndyinPA » Thu Aug 16, 2018 11:58 am

For the most part, that's brilliant! I particularly liked the beds, and the bathroom was amazing.

My eight-year-old granddaughter (nine next week) is really into HGTV these days. She loves Chip and Jo and the Property Brothers. On our recent trip out west, every satellite system had it, so we watched a lot of it in the evenings (I was allowed to watch Rachel at whatever time she came on LOL). I think there is at least one tiny house series out there, but I don't watch it. I admire greatly what it takes to come up with all those ideas, but I don't kid myself that I could ever live in one of them. They might be nice for a vacation, though. :think:

I've been to Alaska in the winter and wonder what this would be like then. Those windows make me think chilly, but she probably has that covered.

Thanks for the video.



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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#191

Post by Addie » Thu Aug 16, 2018 12:23 pm

I was thinking it could make a great backyard guest house or a quiet study; or it could go on a flat rooftop. I wouldn't like to live full time in one, but I think they're great.


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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#192

Post by Whatever4 » Mon Aug 20, 2018 9:08 pm

This past weekend I stayed in a super cute tiny cabin in the woods. Bigger than a shed, smaller than a garage. Probably about 275 sq ft. Bedroom 1 fit a full size bed, bedroom 2 fit bunk beds. Kitchen was smaller than both. Primo shower, though. Good for the 2 nights I was there. Would drive me nuts for longer as there was no comfy chair.

Also, unexpected acorns falling on a tin roof are startling. Was convinced the squirrels were laying seige.
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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#193

Post by Whatever4 » Mon Aug 20, 2018 9:26 pm

Addie wrote:
Thu Aug 16, 2018 12:23 pm
I was thinking it could make a great backyard guest house or a quiet study; or it could go on a flat rooftop. I wouldn't like to live full time in one, but I think they're great.
That’s like perfect for a guest house. Wonder what it would cost.


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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#194

Post by Addie » Fri Aug 31, 2018 9:47 pm



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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#195

Post by Whatever4 » Fri Aug 31, 2018 11:14 pm

Ok, that one goes in the keeper file.

Except... outdoor shower has no walls? :shock:


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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#196

Post by Addie » Fri Aug 31, 2018 11:26 pm

The interior is exquisite. I love this one. :lovestruck:


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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#197

Post by Whatever4 » Fri Aug 31, 2018 11:37 pm

Addie wrote:
Fri Aug 31, 2018 11:26 pm
The interior is exquisite. I love this one. :lovestruck:
Me too. That kitchen and the pantry. :lovestruck: :lovestruck:


"[Moderate] doesn't mean you don't have views. It just means your views aren't predictable ideologically one way or the other, and you're trying to follow the facts where they lead and reach your own conclusions."
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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#198

Post by AndyinPA » Sat Sep 01, 2018 1:41 pm

Really gorgeous!



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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#199

Post by Volkonski » Tue Sep 25, 2018 8:28 pm



Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace

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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#200

Post by Addie » Wed Sep 26, 2018 8:16 am

NPR
Building A Better Mosquito Trap — One Scientist Thinks He's Done It ...



The bottom bucket contains water with some rotting grass floating in it. Aedes mosquitoes typically lay their eggs in stagnant water. The middle bucket has a net to trap any mosquitoes that hatch in the water.

It's a simple setup, but the scientist who invented the GAT, Scott Ritchie of the Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine at James Cook University, says there are several reasons it's effective.

"Most mosquitoes are innately attracted to black," Ritchie says, so that's what lures them in.

Female mosquitoes are the ones that bite people, and once they're stuffed with blood, they're eager to lay eggs.

"So we've got the blackness that brings them to the trap, and then we've got the stagnant water actually inside the trap where they can't escape," Ritchie says. "If you trap out enough of the egg-laying mosquitoes, then there aren't going to be eggs in the wild, so the population will crash."



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