Treating chronic pain

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Re: Treating chronic pain

#201

Post by AndyinPA » Thu May 30, 2019 10:41 am

Off Topic
Weird, off topic. I get the migraine auras without the migraines. I thought it was something wrong with my eyes, so I told my optometrist about it years ago and he told me what it actually was.



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Re: Treating chronic pain

#202

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Thu May 30, 2019 10:41 am

https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/health ... -headache/
Is It a Migraine or a Another Headache? How to Tell the Difference, According to Neurologists

Is a migraine just a bad headache?
No, migraines are a neurological disorder that affect 39 million people in the U.S. Often difficult to prevent and treat, it can make you miss work and other obligations.

"The headache of a migraine tends to be moderate to severe," says, Lawrence Newman, M.D., neurologist and director of the Headache Division at NYU Langone Health. "It’s associated with nausea and vomiting, or light and sound sensitivity. Typically, it prohibits you from routine activities — you want to lie down or rest until the attack goes away — and a migraine can last 4 to 72 hours, so it’s pretty impressive in its ability to do harm."

What happens in the brain during a migraine?
A migraine can start when the trigeminal nerve, which supplies sensation to the head, gets activated. "When that nerve gets excited, there’s a release of certain chemicals that cause the blood vessels and the covering of the brain to become swollen," Dr. Newman says. "Then other chemicals get released to cause inflammation around there. That’s why it hurts so much." That pain then gets carried up into different areas of the brain, causing sensitivity to light and sound, nausea, and other side effects.

To ward off migraine attacks, Dr. Newman recommends following the mnemonic SEEDS:

Sleep: Get enough sleep and follow roughly the same schedule every day.
Eating: Have three regular meals per day.
Exercise: Work out at least three days per week.
Drinking: Stay hydrated and avoid too much caffeine and alcohol.
Stress Reduction: Try yoga, biofeedback, or other mindfulness exercises.


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Re: Treating chronic pain

#203

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Thu May 30, 2019 10:42 am

AndyinPA wrote:
Thu May 30, 2019 10:41 am
Off Topic
Weird, off topic. I get the migraine auras without the migraines. I thought it was something wrong with my eyes, so I told my optometrist about it years ago and he told me what it actually was.
That's interesting.


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Re: Treating chronic pain

#204

Post by Sugar Magnolia » Thu May 30, 2019 11:00 am

AndyinPA wrote:
Thu May 30, 2019 10:41 am
Off Topic
Weird, off topic. I get the migraine auras without the migraines. I thought it was something wrong with my eyes, so I told my optometrist about it years ago and he told me what it actually was.
My husband does also.



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Re: Treating chronic pain

#205

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Thu Oct 03, 2019 10:48 am

https://scienceblog.com/511000/the-scie ... -do-we-go/
The Science Of Mindfulness — What Do We Really Know And Where Do We Go?

The historical practice of mindfulness is a burgeoning integrated medicine field associated with benefits for people with issues ranging from insomnia to chronic pain and fueled by more than $550 million in federal funding over the past 20 years.

Yet the evidence for impact on health from mindfulness is sometimes outpaced by popular discourse on the promise. The science, hype and potential for clinical applications are explored in a special issue of Current Opinions in Psychology dedicated to contextualizing an emerging field of empirical research supporting the practice of mindfulness.

The special issue brings together contributions and collaboration from over 100 scholars and scientists who have authored a total of 57 papers focusing on the historical and conceptual foundations; the basic science; clinical applications; and social applications. The special issue is free to the public for 30 days through Oct. 30.


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Re: Treating chronic pain

#206

Post by p0rtia » Thu Oct 03, 2019 10:54 am

Sugar Magnolia wrote:
Thu May 30, 2019 11:00 am
AndyinPA wrote:
Thu May 30, 2019 10:41 am
Off Topic
Weird, off topic. I get the migraine auras without the migraines. I thought it was something wrong with my eyes, so I told my optometrist about it years ago and he told me what it actually was.
My husband does also.
Me three. I think. Kaleidoscoping colors in a boomerang shape? Lasts about 20 minutes. I was told it was eye strain. Different thingy?


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Re: Treating chronic pain

#207

Post by AndyinPA » Thu Oct 03, 2019 11:08 am

p0rtia wrote:
Thu Oct 03, 2019 10:54 am
Sugar Magnolia wrote:
Thu May 30, 2019 11:00 am
AndyinPA wrote:
Thu May 30, 2019 10:41 am
Off Topic
Weird, off topic. I get the migraine auras without the migraines. I thought it was something wrong with my eyes, so I told my optometrist about it years ago and he told me what it actually was.
My husband does also.
Me three. I think. Kaleidoscoping colors in a boomerang shape? Lasts about 20 minutes. I was told it was eye strain. Different thingy?
That’s what I get.



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Re: Treating chronic pain

#208

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Wed Oct 09, 2019 11:02 am

https://www.news-medical.net/health/Can ... raine.aspx
Can Weather or Air Pollution Trigger Migraine?

[O]ne study involving migraine patients has claimed that there is a 7.5% higher risk of transiently triggering migraine headache with a temperature rise of 5°C. The same study have also revealed that lower barometric pressure is another important trigger for migraine.

Another study on migraine showed that higher relative humidity is associated with a higher risk of migraine headache onset only in warm climates. However, it is believed that low barometric pressure does not trigger migraine alone; other related factors, such as warm climate, dust, wind, cloud cover, and precipitation work together to create conditions that make migraine more likely in certain persons.

Regarding mechanism of migraine headache onset, a neurovascular event called cortical spreading depression is known to trigger migraine headache by activating prevascular trigeminal nerves. Moreover, a small change in barometric pressure causes dilation of cerebral blood vessels and increased release of serotonin from platelets. This further leads to serotonin-induced vasoconstriction and onset of migraine with aura. Afterward, a reduction in blood serotonin level causes rapid expansion of cerebral blood vessels, leading to onset of migraine.


Growing evidence suggests that air pollution can trigger migraines. Various air pollutants, including lead, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and particulate matters (PM10 and PM2.5), are known to have positive association with migraine intensity, frequency, and duration, as well as the rate of doctor visit due to migraine attack.


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Re: Treating chronic pain

#209

Post by Slim Cognito » Wed Oct 09, 2019 3:41 pm

I know this thread is about chronic pain, but I've also suffered from lifelong insomnia. My mother has stories of me as a baby keeping her up all night until she finally gave up and stuffed my crib full of bottles (somehow my teeth survived).

But about a year or so ago I started using medical MJ for my arthritis pain, specifically at night. It worked beautifully and for the last 15 months or so I have slept like a baby should. But I started getting concerned I was becoming, at the very least, psychologically dependent on it so i went to bed last night without it. And I slept pretty good. I did wake up a lot (typical) but was able to go right back to sleep (not typical. I used to lie in bed for 3-4 hours hoping to get another 1-hour catnap in).

Anyhoo, I wonder if taking the MJ, and finally falling asleep without difficulty, has trained my body to fall asleep on its own. I'll try it again tonight, if the arthritis isn't too bad.


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Re: Treating chronic pain

#210

Post by Whatever4 » Wed Oct 09, 2019 10:09 pm

Slim Cognito wrote:
Wed Oct 09, 2019 3:41 pm
I know this thread is about chronic pain, but I've also suffered from lifelong insomnia. My mother has stories of me as a baby keeping her up all night until she finally gave up and stuffed my crib full of bottles (somehow my teeth survived).

But about a year or so ago I started using medical MJ for my arthritis pain, specifically at night. It worked beautifully and for the last 15 months or so I have slept like a baby should. But I started getting concerned I was becoming, at the very least, psychologically dependent on it so i went to bed last night without it. And I slept pretty good. I did wake up a lot (typical) but was able to go right back to sleep (not typical. I used to lie in bed for 3-4 hours hoping to get another 1-hour catnap in).

Anyhoo, I wonder if taking the MJ, and finally falling asleep without difficulty, has trained my body to fall asleep on its own. I'll try it again tonight, if the arthritis isn't too bad.
You have my attention now... what delivery system?


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Re: Treating chronic pain

#211

Post by Maybenaut » Wed Oct 09, 2019 10:19 pm

AndyinPA wrote:
Thu Oct 03, 2019 11:08 am
p0rtia wrote:
Thu Oct 03, 2019 10:54 am
Sugar Magnolia wrote:
Thu May 30, 2019 11:00 am


My husband does also.
Me three. I think. Kaleidoscoping colors in a boomerang shape? Lasts about 20 minutes. I was told it was eye strain. Different thingy?
That’s what I get.
I get those too. My optometrist said it’s a migraine, but the affected nerve is the optic nerve. Freaked. Me. Out. the first time it happened. When it happens (about twice a year) I shut down all my devices and go lie down for a bit. Sometimes I fall asleep; sometimes I don’t. Even though I don’t have pain, I usually feel “off” when they happen, and some good sleep helps enormously.


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Re: Treating chronic pain

#212

Post by Slim Cognito » Wed Oct 09, 2019 10:49 pm

Whatever4 wrote:
Wed Oct 09, 2019 10:09 pm
Slim Cognito wrote:
Wed Oct 09, 2019 3:41 pm
I know this thread is about chronic pain, but I've also suffered from lifelong insomnia. My mother has stories of me as a baby keeping her up all night until she finally gave up and stuffed my crib full of bottles (somehow my teeth survived).
...
You have my attention now... what delivery system?
For all night relief/sleep, a few drops of oil orally work best for me. I'd never smoked, but was told
vaping or smoking is the best delivery system. I have a vape pen, great for immediate relief but I'm afraid of it now, and I'd just learned how to inhale w/o coughing. Orally takes a couple of hours to work thru the liver so i take it about 8:30 pm.

And if I'm in bed before 10:30, I beat the munchies.


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Re: Treating chronic pain

#213

Post by Estiveo » Wed Oct 09, 2019 11:09 pm

Maybenaut wrote:
Wed Oct 09, 2019 10:19 pm
AndyinPA wrote:
Thu Oct 03, 2019 11:08 am
p0rtia wrote:
Thu Oct 03, 2019 10:54 am


Me three. I think. Kaleidoscoping colors in a boomerang shape? Lasts about 20 minutes. I was told it was eye strain. Different thingy?
That’s what I get.
I get those too. My optometrist said it’s a migraine, but the affected nerve is the optic nerve. Freaked. Me. Out. the first time it happened. When it happens (about twice a year) I shut down all my devices and go lie down for a bit. Sometimes I fall asleep; sometimes I don’t. Even though I don’t have pain, I usually feel “off” when they happen, and some good sleep helps enormously.
Scintillating scotoma? The sparkly fog? I get those too. Freaked me out the first time it happened.


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Re: Treating chronic pain

#214

Post by Foggy » Thu Oct 10, 2019 6:53 am

Umm ... y'all do know that 'chronic' is a slang word from California that means 'marijuana', yesno? :blink:


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Re: Treating chronic pain

#215

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Mon Oct 14, 2019 6:34 pm

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/new-a ... ar-AAIJRig
New approaches to treating chronic pain include more support and focusing on overall wellness


New approaches to treating chronic pain include more support and focusing on overall wellness

A 2019 study of 294 chronic pain patients examined how other out-of-office treatments might improve pain symptoms, as well as mood-related conditions such as depression and anxiety. In the research, the first group of patients were put on a Web-based self-management program with modules about coping with pain, pain medications, communicating with providers, cognitive strategies and more; the patients did regular self-reporting of symptoms and got reminders to complete their modules.

The second group was treated with the Web-based self-management program, but the patients were also monitored by a nurse who would contact them to add and adjust medications for pain and facilitate mental health referrals for depression and anxiety,” according to study lead researcher Kurt Kroenke, professor of medicine at Indiana University and a research scientist at Regenstrief Institute. “The nurse had weekly care management meetings with the supervising physician to develop treatment plans for new patients as well as those who were not responding adequately to their current treatment regimens,” he says.

The results of continued care were promising. “Both groups had moderate improvement in their pain and mood symptoms, and the improvement was superior what has historically been seen in primary care studies where the control arm simply received ‘usual primary care,’ ” Kroenke says. “The patient group that additionally received telecare from the nurse-physician team had further improvement beyond that experienced by the group that only received online self-management.”

Another factor in managing and preventing chronic pain is overall wellness. “The first thing is to stay physically fit and physically active,” Khelemsky says. “If I could change one thing [it would be that] everyone would eat a proper diet and do some type of physical activity where you’re using your muscles. It’s not just good for the physical body, but it’s good for the emotional state, as well.”


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Re: Treating chronic pain

#216

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Mon Oct 14, 2019 6:41 pm

https://www.psychologytoday.com/za/blog ... e-amygdala
Pain and Emotion: The Role of the Amygdala
The amygdala processes emotions and gives meaning to pain.


We experience sensations very differently depending on what emotions go along with them. When we are depressed, scared, or anxious, the amygdala interprets injury and sensation as threatening. What happens?

Everything hurts more.

The effects of negative emotions on pain are incredibly powerful. One reason that disassociatives can work as painkillers is by turning down the fear receptors in the amygdala. They don't damp down the sensation of pain.

It seems impossible that someone in pain can be laughing and playing a videogame one minute, then overwhelmed and unable to set the table or focus on homework. But it happens all the time. The positive emotions and activation of the brain—plus the conscious focus on the activity instead of the pain—change how pain is experienced.

That’s not faking it. It’s neuroscience.

The role of the amygdala in pain is one reason most pain professionals recommend people in pain work hard on getting out and seeing people, meditate or exercise to reduce their stress levels, and get treatment for depression and anxiety.


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Re: Treating chronic pain

#217

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Thu Oct 17, 2019 10:15 am

According to a 2012 study in the journal Pain, chronic pain is associated with more daily expressions of anger. No shit, right? We don’t exactly need science to tell us this. Anecdotally, plenty of women express feeling anger around chronic pain. It’s not just the pain that causes it, though, it’s that the world isn’t built to accommodate invisible illness. We’re trained to see sick people as burdens on society and on our patience and comfort. The chronically ill are sometimes accused of “playing the victim” for pity or attention. If being a “victim” is what it takes to find accommodation, understanding, compassion, financial aid, and employment considerations, sure—I’ll play the victim.
History has drawn women in the shape of weakness. In the shape of melodrama. In the shape of less-than.

In a 1990 Sex Roles study on patients who’d undergone surgery to improve their hearts’ blood flow, researchers found that female patients were less likely to receive pain medicine and more likely to receive sedation than male patients. As if we’re not in pain, we’re hysterical. As if it’s not physical, it’s psychosomatic.
There are cases upon cases of women suffering from chronic illnesses—like
fibromyalgia or endometriosis, as just two examples—who are told they’re either lying or falsely reporting their pain. All of this is compounded for women of color and trans women.
https://www.self.com/story/chronic-pain ... pondylitis


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Re: Treating chronic pain

#218

Post by Lani » Fri Oct 18, 2019 5:07 am

There are many studies about how women's pain is considered to be exaggerated or mental illness based, leading to unnecessary pain and death. A couple of years ago I posted about 70% of women having different pain than the typical male pain experienced during a heart attack - who receive fast treatment while the women are sent home with medicine for indigestion and a damaged heart.

When I was in my early teens, period pain was horrific. I would curl up in bed and cry and scream into my pillow. After regularly missing school days, I was finally taken to the family doctor. He sat me down and told me that I would have to have a total hysterectomy, which he described in gruesome detail and ended by saying no man would ever marry me. (Actually sounded like a better idea to me than going through such horrible pain every month.) Then he turned to my mother and smugly said "I don't think you'll have any more trouble from her." When I turned 18 I headed off to Planned Parenthood, got pain relief and went on the pill - which was life changing. But to this day, girls and women are still needlessly suffering.


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Re: Treating chronic pain

#219

Post by Whatever4 » Sat Nov 02, 2019 6:11 pm

The Arthritis Foundation has issued guidance for adults interested in CBD for arthritis and insomnia. Great! So I went to Amazon to try some and... I’m bewildered. Prices and quanties are all over the map.:dazed: :crying:

HELP!!

https://www.arthritis.org/living-with-a ... adults.php


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Re: Treating chronic pain

#220

Post by TexasFilly » Sat Nov 02, 2019 8:05 pm

Whatever4 wrote:
Sat Nov 02, 2019 6:11 pm
The Arthritis Foundation has issued guidance for adults interested in CBD for arthritis and insomnia. Great! So I went to Amazon to try some and... I’m bewildered. Prices and quanties are all over the map.:dazed: :crying:

HELP!!

https://www.arthritis.org/living-with-a ... adults.php
Rolling the dice because you don’t know what you’re getting. Lots of women up near the Arctic Circle (where we live May to October) swear by the medical marijuana.

Slightly off topic, but there is a great podcast out called Bad Batch about the Wild West of stem cell therapy.


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Re: Treating chronic pain

#221

Post by Lani » Sat Nov 02, 2019 8:45 pm

Quality, well tested with lab report provided, CBD oils are expensive - up to $150/month.

If you have a pot dispensary near you, the staff may be able to provide more information about good CBD products for arthritis.

https://www.leafly.com/ has collected a lot of articles on arthritis.

The people I know who moved to the mainland to get help for themselves or their children rely primarily on two producers. https://haleighshope.com/ and https://www.charlottesweb.com/ Since young children with severe neurological disorders were involved, the hospitals required a lot of lab data from the companies in order to include the CBD protocol, which those two provided. (Both children had a dramatic reduction in seizure activity.)

Charlotte's Web has a discount for new users and occasional sales.

I used the oil for for a severe back problem that troubled me for several years. At first I thought is was a waste of money, but 3 weeks in the pain disappeared. When it returned later, I used the oil again for a month with the same results. When it works, it works! But not overnight.


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Re: Treating chronic pain

#222

Post by MRich » Sat Nov 02, 2019 9:21 pm

Lani wrote:
Sat Nov 02, 2019 8:45 pm
I used the oil for for a severe back problem that troubled me for several years. At first I thought is was a waste of money, but 3 weeks in the pain disappeared. When it returned later, I used the oil again for a month with the same results. When it works, it works! But not overnight.
If you don't mind sharing more info- what is the cause of your back pain? (Muscular, disc, etc) Did you apply the oil topically or do you ingest it?



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Re: Treating chronic pain

#223

Post by Lani » Sat Nov 02, 2019 10:03 pm

I was in Costco, lifting a case of water and twisted to plunk it in the cart when a weird sensation followed by pain happened. The doctor never ordered an x-ray, saying he could feel the muscle in a knot next to my spine. Had PT for a few weeks, but nothing helped and the constant pain severely limited me. So then Vicodin, bed rest and blessed relief. Problems would pop up over the years with pain returning. And then a friend whose child had significantly benefited from Haleigh's told me I needed to try it.

Years later, I had a spinal x-ray for a different reason and the radiologist saw something in the area of the original problem and opined that my spine had been injured. I'm back in PT for building up muscle support for the area.

Random aches still occur, but when they last for awhile, I pull out the oil. It's slower than popping a pill, but the pain just plain goes away for a good long time. Maybe because of it anti-inflammatory properties?

I use the sublingual oil.


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Re: Treating chronic pain

#224

Post by Lani » Sat Nov 02, 2019 10:06 pm

Lani wrote:
Sat Nov 02, 2019 10:03 pm
I was in Costco, lifting a case of water and twisted to plunk it in the cart when a weird sensation followed by pain happened. The doctor never ordered an x-ray, saying he could feel the muscle in a knot next to my spine. Had PT for a few weeks, but nothing helped and the constant pain severely limited me. So then Vicodin, bed rest and blessed relief. Problems would pop up over the years with pain returning. And then a friend whose child had significantly benefited from Haleigh's told me I needed to try it. I thought it was a waste of money, but then suddenly the problem was gone.

Years later, I had a spinal x-ray for a different reason and the radiologist saw something in the area of the original problem and opined that my spine had been injured. I'm back in PT for building up muscle support for the area.

Random aches still occur, but when the problem is severe and limits what I can do, I pull out the oil. It's slower than popping a pill, but the pain just plain goes away for a good long time. Maybe because of it anti-inflammatory properties?

I use the sublingual oil.


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Re: Treating chronic pain

#225

Post by Sugar Magnolia » Sun Nov 03, 2019 4:43 am

My friend in Knoxville finally got her son on cbd oil for his seizures. He's 27 years old and has had seizures his entire life. The "pacemaker" thing they implanted in his brain did nothing for the seizures, sometimes as many as 100 per day for days on end, and he's been on Depakote for so long at such high doses they can't add any more. Until they started the cbd oil at the end of Aug, he had spent 5 of the previous 8 weeks in the hospital, half of that in the ICU. They actually got the prescription over a year ago but it took until Aug to get the damn legal and insurance issues sorted out well enough to get the oil. She still has to drive to Nashville once a month to fill the prescription, but as of yesterday, he's been seizure free for 38 days.

That is the longest span with no seizures in 27 years.



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