Climate Change

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Volkonski
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Re: Climate Change

#451

Post by Volkonski » Thu Jan 24, 2019 8:48 am

In New England, home prices fall as seas rise

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/climate-ch ... d=62757012
Massachusetts' property owners have suffered the biggest losses, with rising sea levels responsible for lowering the total value Bay State homes by more than $273 million. Maine is next, with nearly $70 million in losses, followed by Rhode Island at roughly $45 million. Losses in New Hampshire, which has the shortest coastline in New England, topped $15 million.

One extreme example includes a house in Boston currently valued at $373,725 that would have been worth almost $800,000 if not for the higher sea level.
Even the North Fork is affected. :(

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Re: Climate Change

#452

Post by Volkonski » Thu Jan 31, 2019 5:05 pm

American colonisation killed so many people it triggered climate change, study suggests
‘Genocide-generated drop in CO2’ resulted from abandoned farmland turning into forests that sucked climate-warming gas from atmosphere


https://www.independent.co.uk/environme ... 56771.html
A University College London team estimates that 55 million indigenous people died following the conquest of the Americas that began at the end of the 15th century.

The majority of these deaths resulted from diseases brought to the new shores by the settlers, which are thought to have wiped out up to 90 per cent of the native population.

:snippity:

As the land was rapidly reclaimed by trees and vegetation, the plants life sucked such an enormous amount of CO2 from the atmosphere that the Earth cooled.

“There is a marked cooling around that time (1500s-1600s) which is called the Little Ice Age, and what’s interesting is that we can see natural processes giving a little bit of cooling,” co-author Professor Mark Maslin told the BBC.
The loss of so many people also resulted in a great increase in the population of the animals and fish that they had eaten. This is why so many bison, passenger pigeons, cod, etc were found by the English settlers when they came in the early 1600's.
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Re: Climate Change

#453

Post by Lani » Fri Feb 01, 2019 3:36 am

Australia is sweltering through record-breaking heat. And the worst is yet to come
https://amp.cnn.com/cnn/2019/01/31/asia ... index.html
Horrific lost of wildlife. :crying:

I lived there in the '90's. Global warming was an everyday concern. I arrived with some (minimal) understanding, but I found myself in a country that was realizing the importance of taking action immediately to try to mitigate the damage. Years later, climate denialists gained power, but the current disaster seems to be bringing something of a change in attitude. Perhaps maydijo will stop by to comment.
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Re: Climate Change

#454

Post by Volkonski » Mon Feb 04, 2019 4:28 pm

A hole opens up under Antarctic glacier — big enough to fit two-thirds of Manhattan
Scientists say if Thwaites collapses, it could trigger a catastrophic rise in global sea levels, flooding coastal cities around the world.


https://www.nbcnews.com/mach/science/ho ... d_nn_tw_ma
Previous research showed that meltwater from Thwaites accounts for about 4 percent of the global sea level rise, said Ted Scambos, a senior research scientist at the National Snow and Ice Data Center in Boulder, Colorado, who was not involved with the new study.

If the loss of ice becomes so severe that the glacier collapses — something computer models predict could happen in 50 to 100 years — sea levels would rise by two feet. That’s enough to inundate coastal cities across the globe.
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Re: Climate Change

#455

Post by Volkonski » Sun Feb 17, 2019 12:45 pm

The Fourth National Climate Assessment is now available.

https://nca2018.globalchange.gov/downlo ... Report.pdf

https://www.globalchange.gov/nca4

This ia a massive document of over 2000 pages.

Part of the Executive Summary for Volume 1-
New observations and new research have increased our understanding of past, current, and future climate change since the Third U.S. National Climate Assessment (NCA3) was published in
May 2014. This Climate Science Special Report (CSSR) is designed to capture that new information and build on the existing body of science in order to summarize the current state of knowledge and provide the scientific foundation for the Fourth National Climate Assessment (NCA4).

Since NCA3, stronger evidence has emerged for continuing, rapid, human-caused warming of
the global atmosphere and ocean. This report concludes that “it is extremely likely that human influence has been the dominant cause of the observed warming since the mid-20th century. For
the warming over the last century, there is no convincing alternative explanation supported by
the extent of the observational evidence.”

The last few years have also seen record-breaking, climate-related weather extremes, the three
warmest years on record for the globe, and continued decline in arctic sea ice. These trends are
expected to continue in the future over climate (multidecadal) timescales. Significant advances
have also been made in our understanding of extreme weather events and how they relate to
increasing global temperatures and associated climate changes. Since 1980, the cost of extreme
events for the United States has exceeded $1.1 trillion; therefore, better understanding of the
frequency and severity of these events in the context of a changing climate is warranted.
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Re: Climate Change

#456

Post by Volkonski » Sun Feb 17, 2019 12:53 pm

The Summary Findings in Volume 2 is 8 pages long so just the 1st sentences of each section-
Climate change creates new risks and exacerbates existing vulnerabilities in communities across
the United States, presenting growing challenges to human health and safety, quality of life, and
the rate of economic growth.
Without substantial and sustained global mitigation and regional adaptation efforts, climate
change is expected to cause growing losses to American infrastructure and property and impede
the rate of economic growth over this century.
Climate change affects the natural, built, and social systems we rely on individually and through
their connections to one another. These interconnected systems are increasingly vulnerable to
cascading impacts that are often difficult to predict, threatening essential services within and
beyond the Nation’s borders.
Communities, governments, and businesses are working to reduce risks from and costs associated with climate change by taking action to lower greenhouse gas emissions and implement
adaptation strategies. While mitigation and adaptation efforts have expanded substantially in
the last four years, they do not yet approach the scale considered necessary to avoid substantial
damages to the economy, environment, and human health over the coming decades.
The quality and quantity of water available for use by people and ecosystems across the country
are being affected by climate change, increasing risks and costs to agriculture, energy production,
industry, recreation, and the environment.
Impacts from climate change on extreme weather and climate-related events, air quality, and the
transmission of disease through insects and pests, food, and water increasingly threaten the
health and well-being of the American people, particularly populations that are already vulnerable.
Climate change increasingly threatens Indigenous communities’ livelihoods, economies, health,
and cultural identities by disrupting interconnected social, physical, and ecological systems.
Ecosystems and the benefits they provide to society are being altered by climate change, and
these impacts are projected to continue. Without substantial and sustained reductions in global
greenhouse gas emissions, transformative impacts on some ecosystems will occur; some coral
reef and sea ice ecosystems are already experiencing such transformational changes.
Rising temperatures, extreme heat, drought, wildfire on rangelands, and heavy downpours are
expected to increasingly disrupt agricultural productivity in the United States. Expected increases in challenges to livestock health, declines in crop yields and quality, and changes in extreme
events in the United States and abroad threaten rural livelihoods, sustainable food security, and
price stability.
Our Nation’s aging and deteriorating infrastructure is further stressed by increases in heavy precipitation events, coastal flooding, heat, wildfires, and other extreme events, as well as changes
to average precipitation and temperature. Without adaptation, climate change will continue to degrade infrastructure performance over the rest of the century, with the potential for cascading impacts that threaten our economy, national security, essential services, and health and well-being.
Coastal communities and the ecosystems that support them are increasingly threatened by the
impacts of climate change. Without significant reductions in global greenhouse gas emissions
and regional adaptation measures, many coastal regions will be transformed by the latter part of
this century, with impacts affecting other regions and sectors. Even in a future with lower greenhouse gas emissions, many communities are expected to suffer financial impacts as chronic
high-tide flooding leads to higher costs and lower property values.
Outdoor recreation, tourist economies, and quality of life are reliant on benefits provided by our
natural environment that will be degraded by the impacts of climate change in many ways.
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Re: Climate Change

#457

Post by Volkonski » Sun Feb 17, 2019 1:04 pm

From Volume 1 Chapter 12 Sea Level Rise-
1. Global mean sea level (GMSL) has risen by about 7–8 inches (about 16–21 cm) since 1900, with about 3
of those inches (about 7 cm) occurring since 1993 (very high confidence). Human-caused climate change
has made a substantial contribution to GMSL rise since 1900 (high confidence), contributing to a rate of
rise that is greater than during any preceding century in at least 2,800 years (medium confidence).

2. Relative to the year 2000, GMSL is very likely to rise by 0.3–0.6 feet (9–18 cm) by 2030, 0.5–1.2 feet
(15–38 cm) by 2050, and 1.0–4.3 feet (30–130 cm) by 2100 (very high confidence in lower bounds; medium
confidence in upper bounds for 2030 and 2050; low confidence in upper bounds for 2100). Future pathways
have little effect on projected GMSL rise in the first half of the century, but significantly affect projections for the second half of the century (high confidence). Emerging science regarding Antarctic ice sheet
stability suggests that, for high emission scenarios, a GMSL rise exceeding 8 feet (2.4 m) by 2100 is
physically possible, although the probability of such an extreme outcome cannot currently be assessed.
Regardless of pathway, it is extremely likely that GMSL rise will continue beyond 2100 (high confidence).

3. Relative sea level (RSL) rise in this century will vary along U.S. coastlines due, in part, to changes in
Earth’s gravitational field and rotation from melting of land ice, changes in ocean circulation, and vertical land motion (very high confidence). For almost all future GMSL rise scenarios, RSL rise is likely to be
greater than the global average in the U.S. Northeast and the western Gulf of Mexico
. In intermediate
and low GMSL rise scenarios, RSL rise is likely to be less than the global average in much of the Pacific
Northwest and Alaska. For high GMSL rise scenarios, RSL rise is likely to be higher than the global
average along all U.S. coastlines outside Alaska. Almost all U.S. coastlines experience more than global
mean sea level rise in response to Antarctic ice loss, and thus would be particularly affected under
extreme GMSL rise scenarios involving substantial Antarctic mass loss (high confidence).

4. As sea levels have risen, the number of tidal floods each year that cause minor impacts (also called
“nuisance floods”) have increased 5- to 10-fold since the 1960s in several U.S. coastal cities (very high
confidence). Rates of increase are accelerating in over 25 Atlantic and Gulf Coast cities (very high confidence). Tidal flooding will continue increasing in depth, frequency, and extent this century (very high
confidence).
:? We have one house near the water in the Northeast and another house near the water on the Western Gulf Coast.
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Re: Climate Change

#458

Post by Volkonski » Wed Feb 20, 2019 4:11 pm

:roll: :madguy: :smokeears:

Trump poised to challenge idea that climate crisis is a security threat

http://www.msnbc.com/rachel-maddow-show ... ity-threat
“Climate hazards such as extreme weather, higher temperatures, droughts, floods, wildfires, storms, sea level rise, soil degradation, and acidifying oceans are intensifying, threatening infrastructure, health, and water and food security,” Coats explained in the annual “Worldwide Threat Assessment” report. He added, “Extreme weather events, many worsened by accelerating sea level rise, will particularly affect urban coastal areas in South Asia, Southeast Asia, and the Western Hemisphere. Damage to communication, energy, and transportation infrastructure could affect low-lying military bases, inflict economic costs, and cause human displacement and loss of life.”

Not surprisingly, Donald Trump, who has suggested the climate science is a hoax concocted by the Chinese, has no use for these findings. What is surprising is what the Republican president intends to do with the information. The Washington Post reported today:

The White House is working to assemble a panel to assess whether climate change poses a national security threat, according to documents obtained by The Washington Post, a conclusion that federal intelligence agencies have affirmed several times since President Trump took office.

The proposed Presidential Committee on Climate Security, which would be established by executive order, is being spearheaded by William Happer, a National Security Council senior director.
Happer is a climate change denier.
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Re: Climate Change

#459

Post by MsDaisy » Sun Feb 24, 2019 1:33 pm

Super Typhoon Wutip Hits 155 mph: Strongest February Typhoon on Record
Super Typhoon Wutip underwent an impressive burst of rapid intensification on Saturday morning, topping out as Category 4 super typhoon with a central pressure of 925 mb and sustained winds of 155 mph—just short of Category 5 strength. This makes Wutip the strongest Northwest Pacific typhoon ever observed in February, as well as the strongest tropical cyclone anywhere north of the equator in February.

According to NOAA’s Historical Hurricane Tracks database, only seven January and February Category 4 or Category 5 typhoons have been recorded in the Northwest Pacific since records began in the late 1940s. Wutip is tied with Super Typhoon Rose of January 1957 as the second strongest typhoon to form in these two months. The only stronger typhoon ever observed so early in the year was Super Typhoon Ophelia, which peaked as a Category 5 storm with 160 mph winds on January 13, 1958.

The previous strongest February typhoon on record was Super Typhoon Higos, which hit 150 mph winds on February 10, 2015.

Wutip rapidly intensified from a Category 3 storm with 120 mph winds to a top-end Category 4 storm with 155 mph winds in 24 hours, under conditions that appeared marginal for rapid intensification: moderate wind shear of 15 – 20 knots combined with sea surface temperatures that declined from 29°C (84°F) to 27°C (81°F) along Wutip's track. These water temperatures are near average for this time of year. As of Saturday afternoon (EST), satellite images showed that Wutip had likely reached its peak intensity, and I do not expect Wutip to become a Category 5 storm. The typhoon appeared to be undergoing an eyewall replacement cycle, and the intensity of the eyewall thunderstorms was waning.
https://www.wunderground.com/cat6/Super ... at6-widget

Birfers are toast

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Re: Climate Change

#460

Post by Volkonski » Mon Feb 25, 2019 1:43 pm

Natalie Wolchover

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For a year I've been reporting this story about major climate news, finally breaking today: A new simulation finds that global warming could cause stratocumulus clouds to disappear in as little as a century, which would add 8°C (14°F) of extra warming.
https://t.co/FEuzx1Y0NS

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Re: Climate Change

#461

Post by Volkonski » Mon Feb 25, 2019 2:00 pm

The Ocean Is Running Out of Breath, Scientists Warn
Widespread and sometimes drastic marine oxygen declines are stressing sensitive species—a trend that will continue with climate change


https://www.scientificamerican.com/arti ... ists-warn/
In the past decade ocean oxygen levels have taken a dive—an alarming trend that is linked to climate change, says Andreas Oschlies, an oceanographer at the Helmholtz Center for Ocean Research Kiel in Germany, whose team tracks ocean oxygen levels worldwide. “We were surprised by the intensity of the changes we saw, how rapidly oxygen is going down in the ocean and how large the effects on marine ecosystems are,” he says.

It is no surprise to scientists that warming oceans are losing oxygen, but the scale of the dip calls for urgent attention, Oschlies says. Oxygen levels in some tropical regions have dropped by a startling 40 percent in the last 50 years, some recent studies reveal. Levels have dropped more subtly elsewhere, with an average loss of 2 percent globally.

Ocean animals large and small, however, respond to even slight changes in oxygen by seeking refuge in higher oxygen zones or by adjusting behavior, Oschlies and others in his field have found. These adjustments can expose animals to new predators or force them into food-scarce regions. Climate change already poses serious problems for marine life, such as ocean acidification, but deoxygenation is the most pressing issue facing sea animals today, Oschlies says. After all, he says, “they all have to breathe.”

A warming ocean loses oxygen for two reasons: First, the warmer a liquid becomes, the less gas it can hold. That is why carbonated beverages go flat faster when left in the sun, Oschlies says. Second, as polar sea ice melts, it forms a layer of buoyant water at the sea surface above colder, more saline waters. This process creates a sort of lid that can keep currents from mixing surface water down to deeper depths. And because all oxygen enters this habitat at the surface—either directly from the atmosphere or from surface-dwelling phytoplankton producing it during photosynthesis—less mixing means less of it at depth.
Menhaden, "the most important fish in the sea", are particularly affected by low oxygen conditions.
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Re: Climate Change

#462

Post by Volkonski » Mon Feb 25, 2019 4:18 pm

I have now read the 1st chapter. Scary stuff. He writes well and manages to feel some optimism that I cannot share.
Volkonski wrote:
Wed Jan 09, 2019 3:48 pm
I have to order this book.
David Wallace-Wells

@dwallacewells
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More David Wallace-Wells Retweeted Crown Publishing
Next month, @timdugganbooks will publish my big climate book, The Uninhabitable Earth, in which I try to take a very broad, and very long, view of the state of the climate crisis and all the ways it promises to transform how we live on this planet—all of us. (1/x)

The subtitle of the book is "Life After Warming," and while it is not a survey of worst-case scenarios, the portrait of our near-term future is harrowing enough, as anyone following the news from climate science knows.

:snippity: .
There is more in that thread.
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Re: Climate Change

#463

Post by Volkonski » Tue Feb 26, 2019 1:32 pm

:o
The New York Times

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On Tuesday, Britain experienced the highest temperatures ever recorded in the country in winter, with temperatures peaking at 21.2 degrees Celsius (70.16 Fahrenheit). It's the hottest February day in Britain since records began in 1910.
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Re: Climate Change

#464

Post by RTH10260 » Wed Feb 27, 2019 9:33 am

UK - rather than being wet of rain or under seasonal snow the dried last years gras and bushes are exposed.
Marsden moorland fire: 'Apocalyptic' moorland blaze put out

Fire crews have extinguished a huge blaze on moorland in West Yorkshire.

The fire, described by one witness as "apocalyptic", started at about 19:30 GMT on Tuesday and covered about 1.5 sq km of land near Marsden.

West Yorkshire Fire and Rescue said it was "one of the biggest moorland fires we've ever had to deal with".

It came as the UK broke the record for the warmest winter day for a second time and on the same day as a gorse fire on Arthur's Seat in Edinburgh.

Following a night spent tackling the blaze, near Saddleworth Moor between Huddersfield and Manchester, a fire service spokesperson said: "The fire now looks to be out."

However, they said crews and specialist moorland firefighting units "will remain at the scene for much of the day to tackle any further hot spots".


https:// www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-leeds-47381119

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Re: Climate Change

#465

Post by Dan1100 » Wed Feb 27, 2019 8:13 pm

RTH10260 wrote:
Wed Feb 27, 2019 9:33 am
UK - rather than being wet of rain or under seasonal snow the dried last years gras and bushes are exposed.
Marsden moorland fire: 'Apocalyptic' moorland blaze put out

Fire crews have extinguished a huge blaze on moorland in West Yorkshire.

The fire, described by one witness as "apocalyptic", started at about 19:30 GMT on Tuesday and covered about 1.5 sq km of land near Marsden.

:snippity:

https:// www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-leeds-47381119
1.5 km is 370 acres. Even by Midwestern standards, that isn't that big of a fire.
"Devin Nunes is having a cow over this."

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Re: Climate Change

#466

Post by Volkonski » Thu Feb 28, 2019 3:18 pm

The World Is Losing Fish to Eat as Oceans Warm, Study Finds

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/02/28/clim ... &smtyp=cur
The study found that the amount of seafood that humans could sustainably harvest from a wide range of species shrank by 4.1 percent from 1930 to 2010, a casualty of human-caused climate change.

“That 4 percent decline sounds small, but it’s 1.4 million metric tons of fish from 1930 to 2010,” said Chris Free, the lead author of the study, which appears in the journal Science.

Scientists have warned that global warming will put pressure on the world’s food supplies in coming decades. But the new findings — which separate the effects of warming waters from other factors, like overfishing — suggest that climate change is already having a serious impact on seafood.

Fish make up 17 percent of the global population’s intake of protein, and as much as 70 percent for people living in some coastal and island countries, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.
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Re: Climate Change

#467

Post by Volkonski » Fri Mar 01, 2019 12:49 pm

Methane in the atmosphere is surging, and that’s got scientists worried

https://www.latimes.com/science/science ... story.html
This enigma involves methane, a potent greenhouse gas. Twenty years ago, the level of methane in the atmosphere stopped increasing, giving humanity a bit of a break when it came to slowing climate change. But the concentration started rising again in 2007 — and it’s been picking up the pace over the last four years, according to new research.

:snippity:

Methane is produced when dead stuff breaks down without much oxygen around. In nature, it seeps out of waterlogged wetlands, peat bogs, and sediments. Forest fires produce some too.

These days, however, human activities churn out about half of all methane emissions. Leaks from fossil fuel operations are a big source, as is agriculture — particularly raising cattle, which produce methane in their guts. Even the heaps of waste that rot in landfills produce the gas.

The atmosphere contains far less methane than carbon dioxide. But methane is so good at trapping heat that one ton of the gas causes 32 times as much warming as one ton of CO2 over the course of a century.
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Re: Climate Change

#468

Post by tencats » Wed Mar 13, 2019 3:33 pm

Arctic temperature rises must be urgently tackled, warns UN
Joyce Msuya, of UN Environment, aims to avoid dangerous tipping points
Wed 13 Mar 2019 15.01 EDT
Sharp and potentially devastating temperature rises of 3C to 5C in the Arctic are now inevitable even if the world succeeds in cutting greenhouse gas emissions in line with the Paris agreement, new research has found.

Winter temperatures at the north pole are likely to rise by at least 3C above pre-industrial levels by mid-century, with further rises to between 5C and 9C above the recent average for the region, according to the UN.

Such changes would result in rapidly melting ice and permafrost, leading to sea level rises and potentially to even more destructive levels of warming. Scientists fear Arctic heating could trigger a climate “tipping point”, as melting permafrost releases the powerful greenhouse gas methane into the atmosphere, which would in turn create a runaway warming effect.
https://www.theguardian.com/environment ... d-warns-un

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Re: Climate Change

#469

Post by Volkonski » Mon Mar 25, 2019 1:28 pm

Map shows how climate change will affect Houston 60 years from now

https://www.chron.com/news/houston-texa ... socialflow
By 2080, Houston's climate could feel closer to the current climate in Ciudad Mante, Mexico, according to the study from the University of Maryland.

:snippity:

"Within the lifetime of children living today, the climate of many regions is projected to change from the familiar to conditions unlike those experienced in the same place by their parents, grandparents, or perhaps any generation in millennia," said the study's author, Matt Fitzpatrick, associate professor at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science.

Overall, urban areas in North America could feel more like the current climates about 500 miles south, the study said. Cities in the eastern parts of the U.S., including Boston, New York and Philadelphia, could become similar to U.S. climates in the south and southwest.
https://www.umces.edu/news/climate-nort ... eration%20

Interactive map is here-

https://fitzlab.shinyapps.io/cityapp/
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Re: Climate Change

#470

Post by MsDaisy » Sat Mar 30, 2019 4:46 pm

Trump’s Order to Open Arctic Waters to Oil Drilling Was Unlawful, Federal Judge Finds
WASHINGTON — In a major legal blow to President Trump’s push to expand offshore oil and gas development, a federal judge ruled that an executive order by Mr. Trump that lifted an Obama-era ban on oil and gas drilling in the Arctic Ocean was unlawful.

The decision, by Judge Sharon L. Gleason of the United States District Court for the District of Alaska, concluded late Friday that President Barack Obama’s 2015 and 2016 withdrawal of about 120 million acres of Arctic Ocean from drilling “will remain in full force and effect unless and until revoked by Congress.” She wrote that an April 2017 executive order by Mr. Trump revoking the drilling ban “is unlawful, as it exceeded the president’s authority.”

The decision, which is expected to be appealed in the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, immediately reinstates the drilling ban on most of the Arctic Ocean off the coast of Alaska, a pristine region home to endangered species including polar bears and bowhead whales where oil companies have long sought to drill. It also has broader implications for Mr. Trump’s effort to push drilling across the American coastline and on public lands.

Specifically, the Arctic Ocean drilling case could give legal ammunition to opponents of Mr. Trump’s efforts to roll back protections for two million acres of national monuments created by Mr. Obama and President Bill Clinton.
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/30/clim ... e=Homepage
Birfers are toast

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Re: Climate Change

#471

Post by neonzx » Sat Mar 30, 2019 4:50 pm

MsDaisy wrote:
Sat Mar 30, 2019 4:46 pm
Trump’s Order to Open Arctic Waters to Oil Drilling Was Unlawful, Federal Judge Finds
WASHINGTON — In a major legal blow to President Trump’s push to expand offshore oil and gas development, a federal judge ruled that an executive order by Mr. Trump that lifted an Obama-era ban on oil and gas drilling in the Arctic Ocean was unlawful.

The decision, by Judge Sharon L. Gleason
Judge Gleason was nominated by Obama, so we'll be hearing about this from twitler, I'm sure.
To which Trump replied, Fuck the law. I don't give a fuck about the law. I want my fucking money.

Grumpy Old Guy
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Re: Climate Change

#472

Post by Grumpy Old Guy » Sat Mar 30, 2019 5:17 pm

Judge Gleason was confirmed 87 to 8, so the Senate Republicans didn’t have much problem with her.
Edit: Trump should send the case to the Alaska Superior Court, Judge Anna von Reitz presiding.

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RTH10260
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Location: Near the Swiss Alps

Re: Climate Change

#473

Post by RTH10260 » Sat Mar 30, 2019 10:15 pm

On the Obama procedure to enact the drilling ban:
NYT wrote:In using his executive authority to permanently ban drilling in most of the Arctic Ocean, Mr. Obama relied on an obscure provision of a 1953 law, the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act, which governs how the executive branch uses federal waters for offshore energy exploration.

The law includes a provision that lets presidents put those waters off limits to oil and gas drilling. Presidents Dwight D. Eisenhower, Richard M. Nixon and Mr. Clinton used the law to protect sections of the Atlantic, Pacific and Arctic Oceans, but those protections came with time limits, usually one to two decades.

In late 2016, as he sought to legally cement environmental protections before Mr. Trump, then the president-elect, took office, Mr. Obama used what both supporters and critics called a creative and unusual interpretation of that law to set a permanent ban on drilling in most of the Arctic Ocean.

I guess this calls for a Thank You Obama!

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Volkonski
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Re: Climate Change

#474

Post by Volkonski » Thu Apr 04, 2019 10:37 am

'Dead corals don't make babies': Great Barrier Reef losing its ability to recover from bleaching

https://edition.cnn.com/2019/04/04/aust ... index.html
Successive ocean heat waves are not only damaging Australia's Great Barrier Reef, they are compromising its ability to recover, raising the risk of "widespread ecological collapse," a new study has found.

The 2,300-kilometer-long (1,500 mile) reef has endured multiple large-scale "bleaching" events caused by above-average water temperatures in the last two decades, including back-to-back occurrences in 2016 and 2017.

The new study, released Wednesday in the journal Nature, examined the number of adult corals which survived these two events and how many new corals they created to replenish the reef in 2018.

:snippity:

Scientists working on the study found the loss in adult corals caused a "crash in coral replenishment" on the reef, as heat stresses brought about by warming ocean temperatures impacted the ability of coral to heal.
Between a quarter and a third of all marine species have some part of their life cycle in coral reefs.
Lose the coral reefs and a quarter to a third of all marine species become extinct.
Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace

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Volkonski
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Location: Texas Gulf Coast and North Fork of Long Island
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Re: Climate Change

#475

Post by Volkonski » Sat May 04, 2019 9:54 am

From Apples to Popcorn, Climate Change Is Altering the Foods America Grows

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/30/dini ... tw-nytimes
Drop a pin anywhere on a map of the United States and you’ll find disruption in the fields. Warmer temperatures are extending growing seasons in some areas and sending a host of new pests into others. Some fields are parched with drought, others so flooded that they swallow tractors.

Decades-long patterns of frost, heat and rain — never entirely predictable but once reliable enough — have broken down. In regions where the term climate change still meets with skepticism, some simply call the weather extreme or erratic. But most agree that something unusual is happening.

“Farming is no different than gambling,” said Sarah Frey, whose collection of farms throughout the South and the Midwest grows much of the nation’s crop of watermelons and pumpkins. “You’re putting thousands if not millions of dollars into the earth and hoping nothing catastrophic happens, but it’s so much more of a gamble now. You have all of these consequences that farmers weren’t expecting.”

Because the system required to feed the country is complex and intertwined, a two- or three-week shift in a growing season can upset supply chains, labor schedules and even the hidden mechanics of agriculture, like the routes that honeybees travel to pollinate fields. Higher temperatures and altered growing seasons are making new crops possible in places where they weren’t before, but that same heat is also hurting traditional crops. Early rains, unexpected droughts and late freezes leave farmers uncertain over what comes next.
Big problems are fruit flies, unpredictable late frosts and too little or too much rain.
Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace

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