Archaeology, palaeontology and other ancient things

User avatar
Volkonski
Posts: 28466
Joined: Sat Mar 02, 2013 4:44 pm
Location: Texas Gulf Coast and North Fork of Long Island
Occupation: Retired Mechanical Engineer

Re: Archaeology, palaeontology and other ancient things

#26

Post by Volkonski »

A mystery.

Archaeologists. A Houston neighborhood called ‘The Scorpion.’ A mystery coin.

https://www.houstonchronicle.com/life/a ... o-19069765
The archaeologists emailed a photo, asking whether anyone at the Houston Chronicle might recognize an artifact they’d dug up. “Chronicle,” say the letters stamped on the brass disc. “30 cents.”

Image

From its name, you’d think the Elysian Viaduct whisks souls of the heroic dead to glory. Disappointingly, it’s a four-lane freeway flyover connecting Near Northside to a downtown spot a little north of Minute Maid Park.

The viaduct was built in 1955. As with many midcentury highway projects, a historic minority neighborhood was condemned to make way, in the name of urban renewal.

Recently, the Texas Department of Transportation hired archaeologists to excavate the historically important site. For generations, it was immigrants’ first rung on the ladder, the place they first settled after coming to Houston to work their way up in the world.
Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace

User avatar
Whatever4
Posts: 12825
Joined: Tue Sep 08, 2009 6:36 am
Location: Mainely in the plain
Occupation: Visiting doctors.

Re: Archaeology, palaeontology and other ancient things

#27

Post by Whatever4 »

Paywall mystery.
"[Moderate] doesn't mean you don't have views. It just means your views aren't predictable ideologically one way or the other, and you're trying to follow the facts where they lead and reach your own conclusions."
-- Sen. King (I-ME)

User avatar
tencats
Posts: 503
Joined: Wed Jan 13, 2016 10:09 pm

Re: Archaeology, palaeontology and other ancient things

#28

Post by tencats »

Image


Cartilage cells, chromosomes and DNA preserved in 75 million-year-old baby duck-billed dinosaur
February 28, 2020 by Science China Press
This study is lead by Dr. Alida Bailleul (Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology, the Chinese Academy of Sciences) and Dr. Mary Schweitzer (North Carolina State University, NC Museum of Natural Sciences, Lund University and Museum of the Rockies). Microscopic analyses of skull fragments from these nestling dinosaurs were conducted by Alida Bailleul at the Museum of the Rockies. In one fragment she noticed some exquisitely preserved cells within preserved calcified cartilage tissues on the edges of a bone. Two cartilage cells were still linked together by an intercellular bridge, morphologically consistent with the end of cell division (see left image below). Internally, dark material resembling a cell nucleus was also visible. One cartilage cell preserved dark elongated structures morphologically consistent with chromosomes (center image below). "I couldn't believe it, my heart almost stopped beating," Bailleul says.

Bailleul and Schweitzer, together with lab director Wenxia Zheng, sought to determine whether original molecules were also preserved in this dinosaur cartilage. The team performed immunological and histochemical analyses on the skull of another nestling Hypacrosaurus from that same nesting ground in Schweitzer's North Carolina laboratory.

The team found that the organic matrix surrounding the fossilized cartilage cells reacted to antibodies of Collagen II, the dominant protein in cartilage in all vertebrates. "This immunological test supports the presence of remnants of original cartilaginous proteins in this dinosaur," Schweitzer says.
:snippity:
The possibility that DNA can survive for tens of millions of years is not currently recognized by the scientific community. Rather, based upon kinetic experiments and modelling, it is generally accepted that DNA persists less than 1 million years. These new data support other results that suggest DNA in some form can persist in Mesozoic tissues, and lay the foundation for future efforts to recover and sequence DNA from other very ancient fossils in laboratories worldwide.

Read it all at https://phys.org/news/2020-02-cartilage ... r-old.html

User avatar
RTH10260
Posts: 25914
Joined: Tue Mar 02, 2010 8:52 am
Location: Near the Swiss Alps

Re: Archaeology, palaeontology and other ancient things

#29

Post by RTH10260 »

;) I want my very own cloned baby dino :!:

User avatar
RTH10260
Posts: 25914
Joined: Tue Mar 02, 2010 8:52 am
Location: Near the Swiss Alps

Re: Archaeology, palaeontology and other ancient things

#30

Post by RTH10260 »

‘Astounding new finds’ suggest ancient empire may be hiding in plain sight
By Lizzie WadeFeb. 27, 2020 , 1:30 PM

SAN JUAN TEOTIHUACAN, MEXICO—On 16 January 378 C.E., a stranger arrived in Tikal, a large Maya city in what is now northern Guatemala. His name was Sihyaj K’ahk’ (SEE-yah Kak), or Fire is Born, and he was likely a mighty warrior from a distant land. Many archaeologists think he hailed from Teotihuacan, a metropolis of 100,000 people about 1000 kilometers northwest of Tikal, near today’s Mexico City. And he may have come with an army.

The stone Maya monuments that record Sihyaj K’ahk’s arrival don’t say why he came or how he was received by Chak Tok Ich’aak, or Jaguar Paw, the long-reigning king of Tikal. But the day Sihyaj K’ahk’ marched into the city was the day Jaguar Paw died.

The engravings suggest Sihyaj K’ahk’ had been sent by a powerful foreign ruler called Spearthrower Owl. Within 2 years, Spearthrower Owl’s young son was crowned the new king of Tikal. In portraits carved on stone monuments there, the new king, named Yax Nuun Ayiin, holds an atlatl, a spearthrower used by Teotihuacan warriors, and wears a Teotihuacan-style headdress adorned with tassels. Some images of him and his father on monuments at Tikal are even carved in the flat, geometric style of Teotihuacan art, distinct from the intricate, naturalistic portraits of the Maya. Under the exotic new king and his descendants, Tikal became one of the most powerful cities in the Maya region.

The stone Maya monuments that record Sihyaj K’ahk’s arrival don’t say why he came or how he was received by Chak Tok Ich’aak, or Jaguar Paw, the long-reigning king of Tikal. But the day Sihyaj K’ahk’ marched into the city was the day Jaguar Paw died.

The engravings suggest Sihyaj K’ahk’ had been sent by a powerful foreign ruler called Spearthrower Owl. Within 2 years, Spearthrower Owl’s young son was crowned the new king of Tikal. In portraits carved on stone monuments there, the new king, named Yax Nuun Ayiin, holds an atlatl, a spearthrower used by Teotihuacan warriors, and wears a Teotihuacan-style headdress adorned with tassels. Some images of him and his father on monuments at Tikal are even carved in the flat, geometric style of Teotihuacan art, distinct from the intricate, naturalistic portraits of the Maya. Under the exotic new king and his descendants, Tikal became one of the most powerful cities in the Maya region.


https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2020/02 ... lain-sight

User avatar
NotaPerson
Posts: 3488
Joined: Mon May 18, 2015 9:33 pm

Re: Archaeology, palaeontology and other ancient things

#31

Post by NotaPerson »

Something fun to watch if you're bored. Or even if you're not...

Am I being detained?

User avatar
Whatever4
Posts: 12825
Joined: Tue Sep 08, 2009 6:36 am
Location: Mainely in the plain
Occupation: Visiting doctors.

Re: Archaeology, palaeontology and other ancient things

#32

Post by Whatever4 »

NotaPerson wrote:
Mon Mar 30, 2020 4:19 pm
Something fun to watch if you're bored. Or even if you're not...
Thanks!
"[Moderate] doesn't mean you don't have views. It just means your views aren't predictable ideologically one way or the other, and you're trying to follow the facts where they lead and reach your own conclusions."
-- Sen. King (I-ME)

User avatar
RTH10260
Posts: 25914
Joined: Tue Mar 02, 2010 8:52 am
Location: Near the Swiss Alps

Re: Archaeology, palaeontology and other ancient things

#33

Post by RTH10260 »

getting to know Sterngards nearest relatives...
Longer overlap for modern humans and Neanderthals
By Paul Rincon Science editor, BBC News website
11 May 2020

Modern humans began to edge out the Neanderthals in Europe earlier than previously thought, a new study shows.

Tests on remains from a cave in northern Bulgaria suggest Homo sapiens was there as early as 46,000 years ago.

This is up to 2,000 years older than evidence from Italy and the UK.

Around this time, Europe was populated by sparse groups of Neanderthals - a distinct type of human that vanished shortly after modern humans appeared on the scene.

There's considerable debate about the length of time that modern humans overlapped with Neanderthals in Europe and other parts of Eurasia.

This has implications for the nature of contact between the two groups - and perhaps clues to why Neanderthals went extinct.

Two new scientific papers (here and here) describe the finds at Bacho Kiro cave.

A tooth and four bone fragments were identified as broadly human based on their anatomical features.

Helen Fewlass, from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, and colleagues determined their ages using scientific techniques. Their analysis, in Nature Ecology & Evolution, says the remains yielded ages between 46,000 and 43,000 years ago, assigning them to a stage known as the Initial Upper Palaeolithic.


https:// www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-52614870

User avatar
AndyinPA
Posts: 4567
Joined: Wed Apr 05, 2017 1:00 pm
Location: Pittsburgh PA

Re: Archaeology, palaeontology and other ancient things

#34

Post by AndyinPA »

https://www.theguardian.com/science/202 ... eries-peru
A faded decades-old black-and-white photograph was the only lead Johny Isla had when he set out on the trail of a sea monster.

The Peruvian archaeologist spotted the image at a 2014 exhibition in Germany about the Nazca Lines, the vast and intricate desert images which attract tens of thousands of tourists every year.

The photograph taken in the early 1970s showed a mysterious killer whale deity carved in an arid hillside. The figure bore some resemblance to others he knew but he had never seen this one before.

Isla, now Peru’s chief archaeologist for the lines, spent hours poring through archives, before returning to Peru – armed with a drone and a lifetime of local field experience – to find it.

After several false starts, it took just two weeks to find the 25-by-65-metre image which had been hiding in plain sight in the hills of Palpa, about 30 miles north of Nazca, in a huge expanse of desert in southern Peru.
These predate the Nasca Lines.
"To argue with a person who has renounced the use of reason is like administering medicine to the dead." -- Thomas Paine

User avatar
Sterngard Friegen
Posts: 46704
Joined: Wed Aug 05, 2009 12:32 am
Location: Over the drawbridge

Re: Archaeology, palaeontology and other ancient things

#35

Post by Sterngard Friegen »

The orange line of Neandertals still roams the planet. One of the last examples inhabits an office with no corners.

User avatar
Atticus Finch
Posts: 261
Joined: Tue Jun 21, 2011 8:44 pm
Location: Hairball Ranch and Catnip Rehab centre
Occupation: Professional pirate and cat wrangler

Re: Archaeology, palaeontology and other ancient things

#36

Post by Atticus Finch »

Sterngard Friegen wrote:
Sun May 24, 2020 6:24 pm
The orange line of Neandertals still roams the planet. One of the last examples inhabits an office with no corners.
As distinguish from the beer belly line of Neanderthals who still inhabit trailer parks and worship the leader of the orange line as their god.

Post Reply

Return to “Science & Technology”