The Weight-Management Thread

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p0rtia
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#76

Post by p0rtia »

Foggy wrote:
Sun Nov 10, 2019 8:03 am
'Course, the meetup didn't help my weight loss. But it was worth every minute of breaking my diet to eat at all the various restaurants with the group.
I used to divide weight management into two modes: weight-loss and maintenance. Eventually I realized I needed a third: festival mode.

Festival mode includes trips, guests, holidays, and any old occasional time I need a break. This helps me keep my sanity; it lets me remember that when the festival is over, I'll be back in one of the other two modes.

I do 2MAD (two meals a day, lunch and supper for me) as part of my baseline weight-loss management. So in festival mode I continue doing 2MAD unless I find myself at a party breakfast. I like that I can do that small thing for my long-term health.

I recently discovered that just about everybody ups their eating on trips, with guests, and on holidays. That they react by skipping a few meals the week after; that their metabolism works to encourage this and make it easy.

Who knew?
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#77

Post by Volkonski »

Broke the 230 lbs barrier a few days ago weighing in at 228.1. :)

Now if I can just get thru Thanksgiving without overeating..........
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#78

Post by p0rtia »

Congrats! That is super news. :heart:

My plan for Thanksgiving is to stay on plan (I'm currently doing OMAD and LOVING It!!!) as long as I can, either to the T-Day itself, or the day before, and commit to getting back on Plan no later than the following Monday.

And to eat hearty in the interim!
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#79

Post by Foggy »

You go, V!
p0rtia wrote:
Tue Nov 19, 2019 8:36 am
I'm currently doing OMAD ...
Yeah, I'm SO MAD I have to diet too also! :madguy:

But today I go see my primary care guy and get a little pat on the head. :roll:
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#80

Post by p0rtia »

:-D

Curiously, I am also supposed to see my PCP today*.

Parallel lives....


*I may not be able to get the car out of my lane, as it is snowing on top of the ice that formed at dawn.
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#81

Post by Foggy »

Foggy wrote:
Tue Nov 19, 2019 8:41 am
... today I go see my primary care guy and get a little pat on the head. :roll:
Blood pressure 102 over 56, a little low because I walked 4 miles already today.
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#82

Post by p0rtia »

Foggy wrote:
Tue Nov 19, 2019 3:01 pm
Foggy wrote:
Tue Nov 19, 2019 8:41 am
... today I go see my primary care guy and get a little pat on the head. :roll:
Blood pressure 102 over 56, a little low because I walked 4 miles already today.
I got 139 over 65. Pretty good for me and my White Coat / vasovagal issues. I'm good to go till June!
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#83

Post by Foggy »

p0rtia wrote:
Tue Nov 19, 2019 5:24 pm
I'm good to go till June!
I'm good to go to ... umm ... until Thursday, when I get my next cortisone shot for my shoulder. :lol:

And some other appointments next year (annual eyes, annual cancer screening) and then my primary care guy wants me back on St. Patrick's Day. But he did say I should be very proud of myself for how healthy I've gotten. He said if'n I feel lightheaded he'll cut my blood pressure medicine in half.
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#84

Post by p0rtia »

Ha! I've got all my docs trained to see me in June and November.

I got one of my BP pills taken away this past spring by my cardiologist, because I pulled a couple of 105/50's. FTR, for the month before I see my cardiologist, I take my BP three times a day for a month, and show him that when I visit. Much better than going off my office BP. My BP fluctuates a lot, but averages in the high 120/60's.

I didn't get dizzy at 105/50, I just recognized it as too low. Cardio guy agreed. Just FYI.

I now have a podiatrist too. *sigh*
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#85

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer »

Sugar is my addiction. By some twist of fate, I no longer crave sugary, carbonated beverages -beer and champagne not included.

https://www.livestrong.com/article/1372 ... ing-sugar/
What Really Happens to Your Body When You Stop Eating Sugar?

Cutting back on added sugar (the kind found in sugary drinks and baked goods) has a positive effect on virtually every part of your body, from your heart to your mental health to your physique. Just check out all the sweet rewards.

But before you know it, skipping sweets won't feel like an uphill battle. How come? High sugar consumption stimulates your brain to produce a greater number of opioid and dopamine receptors, leading to more cravings. When you reduce your sugar intake, your brain creates fewer receptors. "Those neurochemical changes make it easier for you to ignore the urge when you see someone eating a delicious treat, or smell something from your favorite bakery," Aveena says.

We heart this news: A May 2017 review in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that reducing your sugar intake lowers blood pressure.

Saying sayonara to sweets may also slow your skin's aging process, per a paper published November 2015 by the Baylor College of Medicine's Department of Dermatology. "Excessive sugar in the bloodstream attaches to proteins such as collagen and elastin to form harmful new molecules called advanced glycation end products, or AGEs. AGEs damage collagen and elastin, causing them to become dry and brittle, which leads to wrinkles and sagging," Dr. Batra says. "The less sugar you eat, the fewer AGEs you develop."
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#86

Post by Volkonski »

Had a good report from the doctor. Weight is the lowest in many years. Blood pressure so good that he has reduced the dosage on my BP medication. Blood test showed anemia but took another blood sample and that just came back normal.

My waist is 4 inches smaller than a year ago so I have bought new pants.

Sadly it is time for a colonoscopy. ;)
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#87

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer »

Volkonski wrote:
Fri Dec 13, 2019 11:46 am
Had a good report from the doctor. Weight is the lowest in many years. Blood pressure so good that he has reduced the dosage on my BP medication. Blood test showed anemia but took another blood sample and that just came back normal.

My waist is 4 inches smaller than a year ago so I have bought new pants.

Sadly it is time for a colonoscopy. ;)
:thumbs: :dance:
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#88

Post by Foggy »

Except for the colonoscopy part, that's a most excellent report, V. Congratulations.

It's worth the effort to do what you're doing. Today my dad called to wish me a happy birthday, and we were talking about how hard I'm working to get healthy and stay healthy. At one point I told him, "You know, my mother died when she was only six years older than I am today."

"WHAT? :eek2: NO, THAT CAN'T BE RIGHT!!" he said.

So I led him through the math, and he was astounded to realize I was right. She passed away 14 years ago, and she was 20 years older than me.

I'm sure that you and I both want to be around a lot longer than 6 more years. So congratulations again, and keep working on it. I spent an hour lifting barbells and walked 4 miles in the pouring rain today, on my birthday. Dedication. :thumbs:
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#89

Post by Maybenaut »

This is one of those threads that I've avoided because it just made me feel bad about not taking care of myself. I had another allergic reaction a month or so ago (UGH!). Then my doctor told me that I have diabetes (A1C of 8.3) and if I don't get my blood sugar under control I'll have to go on medicine for the diabetes and a statin for high cholesterol.

So. I stopped drinking beer ( :brokenheart: ) and I stopped eating bread ( :crying: ) and I also stopped all other over-the-top carb things (but the beer and bread is the hardest). I started testing my blood sugar two or three times a day. I've been at this a couple of weeks and my blood sugar is falling steadily, and only once early on did it rise above 180 (I ate an entire apple), but the average is now below 125 (my doctor told me before breakfast it should be under 130 and after dinner under 180). But he also said the goal is to get the A1C below 5.5 (which would require an average blood glucose of 112, according to the American Diabetes Association). He said it'll all slowly come down but it will take time.

Anyhoo. Not the worst news I ever got. I actually *like* testing my blood sugar. It's good to know how my food affects my body. And it finally forced me to get off my ass and focus on eating right and exercising more.

Also. I went to a party the other night, and instead of being unable to decide which of these delicious foods I was going to try first, I was like, no thanks. I have an app that charts my blood glucose in a graph, and when I show that to my doctor in a couple of months, I don't want him to see any spikes (damn that apple!).

And. I had a stress test yesterday -- all normal. And I'm slowly losing weight, but that's the least of it as far as I'm concerned.
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#90

Post by Danraft »

Just did a quick skim of the last page or so because I'd hinted to P0rtia that I'd share some of the research findings that have potentially large implications in weight management and she told me about this thread.

I do an inordinate amount of scientific journal research, and the word of the week (related to this topic) would be "Allostasis", which is a refinement of the concept of homeostasis.

In homeostasis, certain cellular environmental variables (ie: body temperature, blood pH, oxygen and CO2 levels, etc) are considered to kept in narrow parameters by regulatory methods activated when the variable starts to go " out-of-bounds". For instance, high body temperature activates the secretion of sweat to lose heat through evaporative cooling.
The concept of allostasis arose in 1988 and includes that an organism's various overlapping regulatory systems is actually often acting in a predictive manner (think Pavlonian production of saliva before food is present) and also accounts for manners of dysregulation.

Related to weight management would be adipostasis which, as the name implies is the system for fat storage management.
1. The amount of fat the body has in reserve is monitored by cellular and nerve signals from each fat storage area.
2. The total amount of "target fat storage" varies by environmental needs (nutrient availability, etc), stress events (by several mechanisms), life stage (age, pregnancy, etc), and other cues.

And, this fascinates me.... When the nerves responsible for carrying the signal of how much fat (and of what type) is stored in that region are snipped or chemically blocked, two things happen.
A. The amount of fat stored in that disconnected region increases dramatically (local effect).
B. The total amount of fat stored in other fat storage locations increases to replace the amount of now "missing" fat storage (global effect).

Holy crap. The implications are important. Set aside the perhaps most important part of "how can we change the target fat storage amount?" And, take a mental walk with me.

This means the efficiency of feedback is potentially quite important. And, this efficiency seems to be variable based on adaptation responses and dysfunction. It also explains, in combination with the global target of adipose storage why weight loss can be a struggle with yo-yo dieat effects.

Exercise not only burns calories, but increases blood flow to areas -- and that also supports neural function. And, nerves can be pinched or lose efficiency that could be restored with range of motion activities like yoga, Pilate's, massage and other techniques.

At least, that's my take on it...thoughts?
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#91

Post by Volkonski »

Weighed 227 lbs this morning so I got thru the holidays with no weight gain. :) I am 50 lbs below my peak weight.

Now to start losing some more.
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#92

Post by Slim Cognito »

Danraft wrote:
Wed Dec 25, 2019 7:28 am
Just did a quick skim of the last page or so because I'd hinted to P0rtia that I'd share some of the research findings that have potentially large implications in weight management and she told me about this thread.

I do an inordinate amount of scientific journal research, and the word of the week (related to this topic) would be "Allostasis", which is a refinement of the concept of homeostasis.

In homeostasis, certain cellular environmental variables (ie: body temperature, blood pH, oxygen and CO2 levels, etc) are considered to kept in narrow parameters by regulatory methods activated when the variable starts to go " out-of-bounds". For instance, high body temperature activates the secretion of sweat to lose heat through evaporative cooling.
The concept of allostasis arose in 1988 and includes that an organism's various overlapping regulatory systems is actually often acting in a predictive manner (think Pavlonian production of saliva before food is present) and also accounts for manners of dysregulation.

Related to weight management would be adipostasis which, as the name implies is the system for fat storage management.
1. The amount of fat the body has in reserve is monitored by cellular and nerve signals from each fat storage area.
2. The total amount of "target fat storage" varies by environmental needs (nutrient availability, etc), stress events (by several mechanisms), life stage (age, pregnancy, etc), and other cues.

And, this fascinates me.... When the nerves responsible for carrying the signal of how much fat (and of what type) is stored in that region are snipped or chemically blocked, two things happen.
A. The amount of fat stored in that disconnected region increases dramatically (local effect).
B. The total amount of fat stored in other fat storage locations increases to replace the amount of now "missing" fat storage (global effect).

Holy crap. The implications are important. Set aside the perhaps most important part of "how can we change the target fat storage amount?" And, take a mental walk with me.

This means the efficiency of feedback is potentially quite important. And, this efficiency seems to be variable based on adaptation responses and dysfunction. It also explains, in combination with the global target of adipose storage why weight loss can be a struggle with yo-yo dieat effects.

Exercise not only burns calories, but increases blood flow to areas -- and that also supports neural function. And, nerves can be pinched or lose efficiency that could be restored with range of motion activities like yoga, Pilate's, massage and other techniques.

At least, that's my take on it...thoughts?
I can't begin to comment on the science behind it. I had to read it twice to somewhat make sense of it. I like the idea of using science to target problem areas and find a way to reduce or even redistribute adipose tissue*, and prevent it accumulating somewhere else (if that's even what you're saying), but it will have to be waaaaay dumbed down for the general population, and that includes myself.

*if I could take 10 lbs of fat off my belly and move it to my ass, I'd look pretty damn good. But I'm fairly sure that's not what you're saying. But that's what it sounds like in my layman's brain.
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#93

Post by Maybenaut »

My doctor told me that where fat is stored on the body is a function of genetics, and the last place you gain is the first place you'll lose. I imagine that you could probably mess with that by interrupting your body's ability to store fat in a particular location. Some drugs have that effect (it's a side-effect of some HIV retro-virus medication, IIRC from some research I had to do for a criminal case some years back).

Unlike most women, I have no hips and even less ass, but more gut and back fat than I'd like. I'm losing weight (slowly), but it seems like my toothpick legs just keep getting skinnier while the rest of my stays the same (that's probably not actually true). Anyway, I don't think I'd mess with any of this even if I could -- I'd be too worried that the fat might end up somewhere really undesirable, like my face.
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#94

Post by Whatever4 »

W2 and I went to a bariatric surgery information session this evening. (I’m right on the line for where insurance pays for the surgery, W2 is a svelte BMI of 23.) We were by far the skinniest ones there. (Apart from hospital staff, that is.)

The hospital has an impressive weight loss program. I’m going to try it out, hopefully without surgery. But I have a number of health issues that would benefit from me being 75# lighter.
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#95

Post by sad-cafe »

thank you for all the great info here. I have gained 40-45 okay 50 lbs since june. The two things that have changed I was failing remicade and so the doc put me on Stelara (fabulous results) and then they discovered I as a Type II diabetic and started taking insulin.

Ithink and hope that the fact Stelara is working so well is the trigger for the weight gain. However, I want to be back where I used to be. Does insulin make one gain weight?

sigh.....

I need help

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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#96

Post by Shizzle Popped »

Yes, insulin can definitely be a factor in weight gain. For me, this was more than offset by the change in diet and the drastic reduction in carbohydrate intake that came along with it.
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#97

Post by Danraft »

I think it's fair to say that there is too little data to make fim assertions.

I'm working of an NIH grant for metabolic biomarkers. I'm calling it Rosetta because the object is to perform a simultaneous, same-patient, parallel comparison of a wide array of (primarily metabolic) biomarkers and contextualize the data -while including a relatively unusual media of cerumen.

Cerumen, aka earwax, is very rich in biomarkers (perhaps richer than any other with tremendous amount of lipid and has proved promising in numerous area.

It's through that metabolic research that I've tangentially made contact with the areas related to the topic of weight loss--its a fascinating area, but the more I work on the Rosetta project, the more convinced I am of its penultimate importance.
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#98

Post by Slim Cognito »

Danraft wrote:
Fri Jan 10, 2020 7:56 am
I think it's fair to say that there is too little data to make fim assertions.

I'm working of an NIH grant for metabolic biomarkers. I'm calling it Rosetta because the object is to perform a simultaneous, same-patient, parallel comparison of a wide array of (primarily metabolic) biomarkers and contextualize the data -while including a relatively unusual media of cerumen.

Cerumen, aka earwax, is very rich in biomarkers (perhaps richer than any other with tremendous amount of lipid and has proved promising in numerous area.

It's through that metabolic research that I've tangentially made contact with the areas related to the topic of weight loss--its a fascinating area, but the more I work on the Rosetta project, the more convinced I am of its penultimate importance.
Please keep us updated. I am very interested.
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#99

Post by Jez »

Since the soy allergy was found, I have cut out ALL processed/fast foods. It's amazing how much stuff has soy in it. I had some McD fries and a McChicken sandwich the other day and had a full rebellion for two days of my digestive system, so that is totally out for me.

I've started an exercise program at the YMCA. Started tracking what I'm eating much more closely. Drinking more water. My diet has consisted of mostly baked chicken and vegetables. A lot of salad dressings have soybean oil in them, so those are out. Crisco vegetable oil is made from soybeans, so I had to buy some canola oil. I also have lots of olive oil, so good there.

I'm hoping that this will help me with my weight loss in the long run. I would really prefer to do this naturally and not resort to any kind of bariatric medications or surgery. I was reading up on LapBand procedures and the procedure is not recommended if you have a BMI over 50, which I definitely do. I might go for a consult, just to get the relevant information about diet both before and after surgery and see if it's something I can stick with.

Here's to healthier eating.
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#100

Post by RTH10260 »

Unexpected Clues Emerge About Why Diets Fail
The physiology of weight regain still baffles scientists, but surprising insights have emerged

By Daniel Engber, Nature Medicine on January 13, 2020

Why is it so hard to lose weight and keep it off? For a moment, several years ago, it looked like we had an answer. In May 2016, The New York Times ran a front-page story on the findings from a study out of the US National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: fourteen reality show contestants had been tracked for half a dozen years after appearing on the program The Biggest Loser. Through dieting and very intensive exercise, each had lost at least 50 pounds during their time on the television series—and a couple had shed more than 200—but the follow-up study found they’d regained about two-thirds of what they’d lost, on average. A handful ended up even heavier than when they first appeared on the television program.

This weight rebound came as no surprise. The tendency of dieters’ bodies to creep back toward prior weights has been among the most reliable and replicable results in the study of weight loss interventions. Research suggests that roughly 80%of people who shed a significant portion of their body fat will not maintain that degree of weight loss for 12 months; and, according to one meta-analysis of intervention studies, dieters regain, on average, more than half of what they lose within two years. Meanwhile, follow-up care that is meant to stave off this backsliding via behavioral or lifestyle interventions appears to be effective only at the margins: across several dozen randomized trials, the benefits of these programs—in terms of minimizing regain—were pretty small at two years, and undetectable thereafter. In short, we’ve known for quite some time that while it’s hard to lose weight, it’s even harder to keep it off.

The Biggest Loser study didn’t just recapitulate this disheartening rule of thumb, however. It appeared to offer something more—an explanation, of a sort, for why the weight rebound might be happening. When the researchers at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive Kidney Diseases, led by physiologist Kevin Hall, examined the contestants six years after the show ended, they noticed major changes to the rates at which their bodies were expending energy. The contestants’ resting metabolic rates had ended up much lower than expected, even taking stock of their smaller statures overall: most were burning at least 400 fewer calories than the researchers’ model had predicted. Some initial dip in metabolic rate is a known side effect of weight loss, but Hall and his colleagues didn’t realize that it would persist for so long, and to such a large extent.


https://www.scientificamerican.com/arti ... iets-fail/

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