The Weight-Management Thread

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HST's Ghost
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#26

Post by HST's Ghost » Sun Jun 23, 2019 8:53 pm

I recently hit a target of 79 kilos and am aiming for 75 now- from a peak of over 95 a few years ago (I'm 53, about 6 ft). I'm very lucky in that I work at home and can freely set my schedule. A perfect diet day would be:
All-day: Water with fresh lime or lemon squeezed in
Breakfast: Real oatmeal with flax seed powder,prunes, raisins, coconut oil, honey, Acai powder and cinnamon
Watermelon a little bit before going to the gym (it's a perennial here in Vietnam)

10:30ish => Gym: Basically 45-50 minutes on the elliptical plus a few other things

Post-workout smoothie: Milk, Greek yogurt, banana/apple or other fruits (frozen grapes!), coconut oil, coconut sugar, powdered turmeric, wheatgrass powder, flax seed powder, cocoa powder etc.

3~4 PM Mid-day meal: Stir-fry made with coconut oil (kale/mushroom etc. - I rarely make with it with any meat although sometimes bacon or egg) on quinoa or brown rice

Dinner: Big salad with good lettuce, five or six veggies (cucumber, radish/daikon, bell pepper, thinly slice raw onion, tomato) and other goodies (like raw sunflower seeds, konbu, chia seed, etc.) I use that good Bragg's apple cider vinegar and coconut oil with other spices for the dressing.

(Popcorn made with coconut oil for snacking)

I feel lucky that growing up in SoCal I developed a taste for salads and have no problem eating it for dinner several nights a week, and as you can see, I am a strong believer in coconut oil, and other superfoods too. I have suffered gout for many years and am not on a daily medicine to reduce my uric acid but last year at my health check my uric acid count was so low I thought they had switched blood samples but it was low again this year, and I feel that turmeric has really helped in that regard.
I have always told people, get the basic three to five servings daily of both fruits and vegetables, and then start working on reducing what you are eating otherwise...

ETA: Although I have made weight targets, I do not weigh myself obsessively everyday. Once your feel your pants are looser, then weigh yourself...
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#27

Post by MN-Skeptic » Sun Jun 23, 2019 9:06 pm

HST's Ghost wrote:
Sun Jun 23, 2019 8:53 pm
ETA: Although I have made weight targets, I do not weigh myself obsessively everyday. Once your feel your pants are looser, then weigh yourself...
For me, it worked best to weigh myself every single day. It kept me focused.

The other odd thing that I did was to record my measurements. Not just the usual bust, waist, and hips, but all the odd ones too - neck, ear to ear under the chin, upper arm, wrist, tummy, upper leg, calf, ankle, etc. Whatever seemed interesting. Then, after losing about 20 pounds, or whenever, I'd measure them again.
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Dan1100
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#28

Post by Dan1100 » Sun Jun 23, 2019 9:26 pm

I quit smoking about 1 1/2 years ago and was a little on the fat side when I did. I probably gained 25 pounds almost immediately.

I've lost about 30 pounds since last September. So I'm a little less fat now than when I quit. I feel like I have about 10 or 15 lbs to go.

I gave up anything sweet, except raisins with oatmeal. I gave up anything that has high cholesterol. I only eat meat once a day with dinner. I try not to eat anything that is starchy that isn't high fiber (no white bread and pasta only in small amounts mixed with lots of other stuff). I've always been a low salt person, and cook with no salt and rarely put salt on anything. I have a giant salad with dinner every night with no dressing, just a little cheese or blue cheese for flavor. When I say giant salad, I mean at least 1/2 head of lettuce or a whole head of romaine giant.

During the day, I try to eat a lot of high fiber, low calorie stuff to feel full. Lots of celery and carrots. Lots of veggie chili (basically canned beans and/or hominy, mixed w/ canned diced tomatoes w/ chilis --I'm not winning any cooking awards) or a can of beans or hominy with plain low salt Campbell's chicken soup. I've cooled it on the raw carrots, I was eating more than a pound a day for a while and I think I was actually starting to turn orange.

I tried the Konjac/glucomannan stuff, but it didn't seem to be as effective as a bunch of celery or carrots or 1/2 a can of beans or hominy.

I put the treadmill right in front of the TV where my comfy chair used to be and try to walk at least 6 miles a day. Just went past 1250 miles since I started keeping track in October. I do pushups 2 or 3 times a week, I'm up to about 500 each time in sets of 35 to 40. I enter all the exercise on a spreadsheet with charts that calculate everything (so far in June 3950 pushups and 129 miles).

If you are going to do the treadmill thing, start slow and get good shoes. I destroyed my feet when I started and finally had to take 2 weeks off for them to heal.

They say 35 miles burns a pound of fat and I was "that seem like an awful lot." Well, from my experience, it seems like it is actually wildly over optimistic.

I rarely weigh myself (although I did before I wrote this message 171 down from 200). I found it discouraging in the beginning how much effort I was putting in, how much my feet hurt, and how little I was losing.

Anyway, that is my somewhat successful weight loss story.
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#29

Post by MsDaisy » Sun Jun 23, 2019 9:41 pm

Dan1100 wrote:
Sun Jun 23, 2019 9:26 pm
:snippity:
They say 35 miles burns a pound of fat and I was "that seem like an awful lot." Well, from my experience, it seems like it is actually wildly over optimistic.

I rarely weigh myself (although I did before I wrote this message 171 down from 200). I found it discouraging in the beginning how much effort I was putting in, how much my feet hurt, and how little I was losing.

Anyway, that is my somewhat successful weight loss story.
Good job Dan! :clap: :dance: :thumbs:
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#30

Post by kate520 » Sun Jun 23, 2019 11:37 pm

Walk walk walk walk walk walk walk walk. Walk. Flat isn’t as good as varied. Treadmill is a poor substitute, IMHO. Yoga good.

I was 60 lbs overweight and hypertensive. I’d always been slim until I married the mr. and started cooking all his favorite foods, to be eaten with bread. And chips. And ice cream. I had a small stroke - I don’t recommend this method - that changed how food tasted and smelled to me. I was almost afraid to eat. I’m salt-sensitive. Too much salt is everywhere. I couldn’t stand processed foods for about 6 months after the stroke, everything had to be fresh, no leftovers, either.

We found the Dukan Diet through my friend Flo which is basically Atkins with French recipes. That kick-started the loss. Walking every single day, every single day. At night, mostly, to beat the heat. Hills and dales do a lot of the work for you. Our street was a 6% uphill grade. When I started my regimen I had to stop several times before I reached home. Very soon I was powering up the hill at the end of a 3-4 mile walk, sometimes twice.

This tip isn’t going to be for everyone, for sure: My doc encouraged me to get a Medical Marijuana green card because after the stroke I was anxious and had a hard time sleeping. I discovered edibles. :thumbs: Specifically medicated Chex party mix. Counterintuitively, they didn’t give me the munchies. I didn’t crave sweets as before and was able to resist the mindless snacking that gets you in so much trouble. One generous handful lasted all day.

I’ve kept those 60 and a bit more off for 6 years now. I do a mini fast a couple of days a week, drinking water but not eating until afternoon. It wasn’t intentional; I only recently learned that it was a thing. It’s just something my body does without my help since the pounds came off.

I like a diet plan that gives you a free meal one day a week. You pick the day and the meal, forget the rules. You start off looking forward to it but after a while, as your body adjusts to the new eating style, it’s like meh, no thanks.
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Dan1100
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#31

Post by Dan1100 » Sun Jun 23, 2019 11:45 pm

But the treadmill is always there and convenient. I've walked a 1.75 miles since my last post, that wouldn't have happened going outside in the middle of the night.
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#32

Post by kate520 » Sun Jun 23, 2019 11:56 pm

Dan1100, I’m a klutz at the gym. I’ve fallen off the treadmill. Twice. 😂 It’s my own personal nightmare; you obviously have mastered it.
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#33

Post by Maybenaut » Mon Jun 24, 2019 12:21 am

There are three categories of food:

(1) Foods that kill me quickly (I’m allergic to these, and while avoiding them is easy in theory, it’s not easy in practice — alpha gal is in *everything*).

(2) Foods that kill me slowly (these are my favorites)

(3) Vegetables (not a fan, but working on it)
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#34

Post by Slim Cognito » Mon Jun 24, 2019 10:08 am

Just going to throw in this one observation of mine. Sleep. Good, unbroken, deep sleep.

As a short female, I've struggled with weight since my 30s. No matter how careful I ate or how much I exercised, I kept putting it on. I confess, my weakness is Pepsi and I allowed myself 3-4 glasses a week because, dammit, I deserved it. No candy, no deserts, no greasy, salty snacks, no big fatty meals, just 3-4 16 oz glasses of Pepsi a week. Ok, maybe a bigger cup if I was out and stopped at 7-11.

I used to joke the only way i'd lose weight was to contract a debilitating disease. Then, dammit, I developed a severe GI illness and dropped 20 lbs. So, yes, that was a cheat.

But I haven't put any of that back on. I've actually lost another 5 or so. And I haven't changed my eating habits, except to confess I drink a glass of Pepsi almost every day now. So why haven't I gained anything? My theory is, for the first time in my entire life (including my childhood) I am sleeping all night.

I recently got a medical marijuana card for my arthritis. I also have lifelong insomnia and restless leg syndrome.* After years of 2-4 hours of broken sleep my entire life, now I fall asleep almost immediately and maybe wake up once in the night, maybe not at all.

Obviously, this isn't everyone's problem, but there has to be others like me. I'd always heard that a good night's sleep would help with weight management, but I never really believed it, until now.

I'm not now what anyone would describe as "slim." Heck, if I bothered to put a little more effort into it (like giving up Pepsi) who knows where I'd end up.

Nah....

*My parents and teachers used to get after me because my legs were always swinging. Kids wouldn't spend the night at my house unless we all slept in sleeping bags because my rocking feet would keep them awake if they shared my bed. RLS is now recognized as a neurological disorder, but back then we were just considered unruly kids. I don't bother treating it during the day as I'm so used to it, it doesn't bother me, just people around me. ;)
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#35

Post by p0rtia » Mon Jun 24, 2019 2:32 pm

Sluffy1 wrote:
Sun Jun 23, 2019 7:19 pm
The key is being in a calorie deficit.
:yeah:
Exactly. I what I like, just not much of it... and has gotten less as I've aged.
Moderation in all things. Super for those that achieve this; not so much for people who fuck up and become obese.

As I've said elsewhere, it's easy to lose weight (pick your plan), the problem is keeping it off.

For most people, simple calorie restriction is not sustainable--not least because it increases hunger that lasts for months after you stop your CR. And if you're obese, it's really not sustainable. Combine CR with a low-fat, high carb diet, and welcome to life on the mobius strip. Where people who have no clue will be quick to tell you that you have no will-power and are "doing it wrong"; which you will accept as true. And around and around. And now you're insulin resistant, And you exercise like crazy but it doesn't help.

Seriously, people, if it were as simple as creating calorie deficit; if low-fat was the answer, we wouldn't have an obesity epidemic.

A lot of stuff lately on how the body doesn't track calories; does not in any way view one calorie as exactly the same as the next calorie. Early days.

Does caloric restriction cause weight loss? Not according to science!
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#36

Post by Hurtzi » Mon Jun 24, 2019 4:14 pm

pOrtia,

this list is from your link:
Choose a low-carb diet
Eat when hungry
Eat real food
Eat only when hungry
Measure your progress wisely
Be persistent
Avoid fruit
Avoid beer
Avoid artificial sweeteners
Review any medications
Stress less, sleep more
Eat less of dairy products and nuts
Supplement vitamins and minerals
Use intermittent fasting
Exercise wisely
Achieve optimal ketosis
Get your hormones checked
Consider weight-loss pills (if desperate)
Only thing I would add:
"Chose a low carb, low fat, high protein diet."

Proteins are in BEANS. My preferred dish is cowboy beans :

Soak dried beans (black, pinto, white - just what you have, but no canned beans) and cook them in instant vegetable broth until eatable, but not really soft.

Sear some cubes of beef (not the better parts, no steak, but not too fat either) in their own fat.

Add chopped onions, garlic. Add a little tomato juice and dried herbs. Let simmer.

As soon as the beef is soft enough add salt, pepper, chili and canned chopped tomatoes. Add the beans, let simmer for a moment.


Enjoy. I can eat that 7 days a week, three times a day - just like the cowboys did (but not my wife).

(It takes a lot of calories to extract the proteins from the barely cooked beans. Same effect with pasta -if you cook them really "al dente " like the Italians do at home (they cook them much softer in their American restaurants) they have much less useable calories.)
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#37

Post by Judge Roy Bean » Mon Jun 24, 2019 11:14 pm

GIbberish. "Dietary counseling" is not the same thing as not having something to eat.

If you don't eat, you will lose weight. POWs and refugees can explain this rather vividly. Participants in such studies are rarely subjected to absolute caloric denial.

It's an uncomfortable reality - you cannot gain weight if you don't eat. If that were possible we could not have starvation on this planet. We do.
“Where all think alike, no one thinks very much.”
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#38

Post by Hurtzi » Mon Jun 24, 2019 11:29 pm

Judge Roy Bean wrote:
Mon Jun 24, 2019 11:14 pm
GIbberish. "Dietary counseling" is not the same thing as not having something to eat.

If you don't eat, you will lose weight. POWs and refugees can explain this rather vividly. Participants in such studies are rarely subjected to absolute caloric denial.

It's an uncomfortable reality - you cannot gain weight if you don't eat. If that were possible we could not have starvation on this planet. We do.
Those who "eat nothing " and still gain weight forget to tell you about their nightly expeditions to the fridge.
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#39

Post by Judge Roy Bean » Tue Jun 25, 2019 12:12 am

Hurtzi wrote:
Mon Jun 24, 2019 11:29 pm

Those who "eat nothing " and still gain weight forget to tell you about their nightly expeditions to the fridge.
I think it's somewhat more nuanced than that. People convince themselves that some seemingly benign behaviors are suitable and can be acceptable for them at some point in time. "Those two extra pieces of bacon are okay since I did (or will do) an extra ten minutes on the treadmill," for example. "I did an extra lap in the pool so I'll have the key lime pie," is another one.

Rationalization, often imaginary in terms of fact, wins because the body has an inflated, innate need to survive that many people cannot bring under control.

When the options to consume are taken away, the body eventually can only function as nature provides. Which, if food intake is drastically limited, means eventual starvation.
“Where all think alike, no one thinks very much.”
Walter Lippmann

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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#40

Post by DrIrvingFinegarten » Tue Jun 25, 2019 10:59 pm

Here's another good article. This one from someone I know who has lost 120 pounds.

https://www.elitefts.com/coaching-logs/ ... t-for-you/.

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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#41

Post by HST's Ghost » Wed Jun 26, 2019 6:36 am

Hurtzi wrote:
Mon Jun 24, 2019 4:14 pm

Only thing I would add:
"Chose a low carb, low fat, high protein diet."

Proteins are in BEANS. My preferred dish is cowboy beans :


Enjoy. I can eat that 7 days a week, three times a day - just like the cowboys did (but not my wife).

(It takes a lot of calories to extract the proteins from the barely cooked beans. Same effect with pasta -if you cook them really "al dente " like the Italians do at home (they cook them much softer in their American restaurants) they have much less useable calories.)
Sounds yum.
I go through periods of making big pots of beans, sometimes with bacon but usually vegetarian with tomato flavoring (have you tried using dried chipotle chili pepper?), and I can eat them everyday too. Supposed to be a negative for gout but I think the benefits outweigh the possible negatives with beans..."Good for the heart...and they make you :flame: "
DrIrvingFinegarten wrote:
Tue Jun 25, 2019 10:59 pm
Here's another good article. This one from someone I know who has lost 120 pounds.

https://www.elitefts.com/coaching-logs/ ... t-for-you/.
Yeah, perfect. I can eat beans and kale and oatmeal for the rest of my life...if I know, come the weekend, I can have some excellent treats! Same advice goes for a workout also -- you have to feel comfortable and happy about doing it (or at least enjoy your podcast or music!) and not look at it like self-inflicted torture...Look good, feel good...
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#42

Post by Foggy » Wed Jun 26, 2019 7:10 am

Beans, yeah. Beans are the answer.

As you know, chocolate is a bean.

Which, as we have learned, is a legume.



Covfefe is also a bean.

Further affiant sayeth naught. :mrgreen:
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#43

Post by p0rtia » Wed Jun 26, 2019 7:20 am

Chocolate is life. And avocados.

:daydream:
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#44

Post by Hurtzi » Wed Jun 26, 2019 4:11 pm

Foggy wrote:
Wed Jun 26, 2019 7:10 am
Beans, yeah. Beans are the answer.

As you know, chocolate is a bean.

Which, as we have learned, is a legume.



Covfefe is also a bean.

Further affiant sayeth naught. :mrgreen:
Just one bar of a really dark chocolate (only cacao butter and no milk fat and low in sugar) is something you can eat daily. Covfeve is good for you too.
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#45

Post by Hurtzi » Wed Jun 26, 2019 4:25 pm

HST's Ghost wrote:
Wed Jun 26, 2019 6:36 am
Hurtzi wrote:
Mon Jun 24, 2019 4:14 pm

Only thing I would add:
"Chose a low carb, low fat, high protein diet."

Proteins are in BEANS. My preferred dish is cowboy beans :


Enjoy. I can eat that 7 days a week, three times a day - just like the cowboys did (but not my wife).

(It takes a lot of calories to extract the proteins from the barely cooked beans. Same effect with pasta -if you cook them really "al dente " like the Italians do at home (they cook them much softer in their American restaurants) they have much less useable calories.)
Sounds yum.
I go through periods of making big pots of beans, sometimes with bacon but usually vegetarian with tomato flavoring (have you tried using dried chipotle chili pepper?), and I can eat them everyday too. Supposed to be a negative for gout but I think the benefits outweigh the possible negatives with beans..."Good for the heart...and they make you :flame: "
DrIrvingFinegarten wrote:
Tue Jun 25, 2019 10:59 pm
Here's another good article. This one from someone I know who has lost 120 pounds.

https://www.elitefts.com/coaching-logs/ ... t-for-you/.
Yeah, perfect. I can eat beans and kale and oatmeal for the rest of my life...if I know, come the weekend, I can have some excellent treats! Same advice goes for a workout also -- you have to feel comfortable and happy about doing it (or at least enjoy your podcast or music!) and not look at it like self-inflicted torture...Look good, feel good...
A lot of very healthy groceries - like beans and canned sardines - can cause gout. There you area really between a rock and a hard place.

Since I had gout in my "big toe " I take my daily dose of Colchicin (one of the oldest and cheapest medications) and forget about gout..
The "water bear" is the first creature to live on the moon.

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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#46

Post by Hurtzi » Wed Jun 26, 2019 4:31 pm

Judge Roy Bean wrote:
Tue Jun 25, 2019 12:12 am
Hurtzi wrote:
Mon Jun 24, 2019 11:29 pm

Those who "eat nothing " and still gain weight forget to tell you about their nightly expeditions to the fridge.
I think it's somewhat more nuanced than that. People convince themselves that some seemingly benign behaviors are suitable and can be acceptable for them at some point in time. "Those two extra pieces of bacon are okay since I did (or will do) an extra ten minutes on the treadmill," for example. "I did an extra lap in the pool so I'll have the key lime pie," is another one.

Rationalization, often imaginary in terms of fact, wins because the body has an inflated, innate need to survive that many people cannot bring under control.

When the options to consume are taken away, the body eventually can only function as nature provides. Which, if food intake is drastically limited, means eventual starvation.
I must admit to not being very nuanced. I like the eight pound hammer (being confronted with an eight inch nail).
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#47

Post by p0rtia » Thu Jun 27, 2019 3:04 pm

Danraft wrote:
Sat Jun 22, 2019 10:42 pm
Re: Why isn't the keto diet recommended more? I'm not a nutritionist and don't know for sure what the emphasis is in today's curriculum, but, I took my courses and I read current research. These are my contemplative thoughts, and, while I have seen some supported in the literature, it wasn't my focus and I have a full plate.

I find it potentially dangerous. As others have mentioned, evolution is a good basis to consider implications ( it is my goto method).
It is "hacking the system" that is meant to respond to stressful situations and maintain balance in the organism. The very old roots of these "stress response" still exist and many "extra" ones are built on the same motifs. The response in the archaic system was dramatic-- a change in proteins to a more heat-stable version, or to shut down, or to do any number of cataclysmic metabolic responses...

Which goes back to Dan-ism "A diseased/stressed system does not respond the same way as a healthy system." The ancient system has roots in nutrient sensing (TOR) and to keep the system in a state of "special" nutrient needs is foolhardy. Unfortunately, and this is my guess, the stress-response systems only "feels" evolutionary selective pressure at rare times and may be more prone to accumulated errors. Being in this Keto state is hard on the organism. It uses a less efficient pathway, that by its very nature, is going to produce more reactive oxygen that causes more mutations.

I mentioned by-products-- burning carbohydrates, as the name suggests, produces CO2 and H20 and energy. That is pure. There isn't any dark smoke coming from that chimney ( if I may use that analogy) whereas burning proteins and fat for energy is akin to burning carpet in the wood stove. Yes, it burns, but the smoke is black and sooty with various byproducts that can clog up the works. The body has systems that counter this, in the liver and kidneys especially, but it is hard work and requires even more calories and invokes even more problems.

Autophagy, in the keto circles, means fasting until the cells have a product shortage and start processing all the items marked for recycling and those items in the recycling centers ( lysosomes) and this can be healthy. It also causes the number of mitochondria per cell to be decreased-- benefits depend on the specific situation. But, the act of fasting also activates systems that are less ideal. And, if done too often, can be detrimental. (In some types of cancer, say the estrogen sensitive ones, it is important to note that even though a receptor has been moved from the cell membrane, that doesn't mean it stops signaling. If, for instance, the sorting mechanisms are not functioning (common in disease state), it may not make it to the lysosome where it would be broken down( and it just keeps signaling). This simple error is made by almost every cell modeling program I have examined.)

Mitochondria are exposed to more reactants and have high mutation rates because of this. There error correcting mechanisms are only so-so and. a primary means of checking (and eliminating bad copies), is for two mitochondria to fuse and the bad copy is eliminated. Great. But, if done too often, this is also a problem. How often is too often? Dunno. The lifespan of mitochondria is about 30 days.
To be honest, I have stayed away from Keto as a research topic because I have close friends who are strong advocates, and I just don't want the friction.

I will say, that there are better hacks. Inducing autophagy or mitochondrial fusion doesn't require fasting. And, much of the "benefits" of keto could be obtained by using a different stimulus which is the presence of specific types of digested fiber in the colon.

Then there is the "lack of nutrients". So many plant products offer incredible health benefits and they are not present.
"Sustainable"? Yes, if the individual is able to afford to eat higher priced food. And, from a global environment viewpoint, it would lead to massive food shortages.

So, in my view, without bothering to confirm hunches or debunk myself or seek true expertise, there are easier and less stressful ways to cause many of the metabolic benefits. And, a LOT of studies would need to be made into all the "off the cuff" concerns and more. It's like doctors saying supplements are a waste of money ( because there is a dearth of randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind studies) and then advocating the Mediterranean diet( for which, by definition, one can't have placebos) which has few solid studies supporting it that would not be accomplished by large amounts of just the olive oil. Olive oil is pretty damn good and, BTW activates the endocannabinoid system (as does canola).

And, it's possible that the largest "causative" element is a shift in the mix of gut bacteria caused by a change in diet. Just eliminating sugar is tremendous, for example. And, oils and fats have a far better glycemic index than simple sugars, which means spikes and valleys in glucose are less strong. This area is, and always has been, controversial. C'est la vie.
Answering here, since we have the nice new thread.

In the weight-management community, the fact that proteins burn extra carbs is considered a plus. :-D But can you tell me what these by-products of which you speak are? Feel free to use chemical nomenclature. And why would this would be a problem with normally functioning kidneys and liver? And are you Vegan or vegetarian?

Many of your discussion points (fast-mimicking, lack of nutrients, electrolytes, the benefits of olive oil). I am myself currently trying to get a handle on the cortisol issue; I short-term fast a LOT, and find that my sleep is disrupted to greater degrees the longer I fast (fourth night I'm up at 2 or 3 and have a hella hard time getting back to sleep). Which is one of the reasons I'm switching to 44 hour fasts and the occasional OMAD (one meal a day). I have breakfast once in a blue moon.

I'm also slowly moving toward having my supper earlier in the day -- finished by 5, or by 4, or, today, 2. I've read some interesting literature (cohort study results) regarding health concerns that show unpleasant disease recurrence for those who eat in the evening compared to those who don't. Of course, if I don't eat at all, that solves that problem.

It's a puzzle! And thanks for your ongoing input, Danraft. This is the stuff I'm currently interested in. <3
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Volkonski
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#48

Post by Volkonski » Thu Jul 04, 2019 12:47 pm

I am losing it slowly but today I weigh 33 lbs less than my peak weight. Still a way to go to get where I want to be.

Following Keto Diet mostly because Mrs. V. is doing so.
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p0rtia
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#49

Post by p0rtia » Sun Jul 07, 2019 7:12 am

Volkonski wrote:
Thu Jul 04, 2019 12:47 pm
I am losing it slowly but today I weigh 33 lbs less than my peak weight. Still a way to go to get where I want to be.

Following Keto Diet mostly because Mrs. V. is doing so.
:dance:

I've dropped significant poundage doing various low carb plans. The only protocol that doesn't back-fire with increased hunger and lowered energy. I do moderate carb now for maintenance and minor corrections, because reasons (body can't tolerate LC anymore; more leafy veggies and some lower-carb fruits fit more in line with my other health-care maintenance plans).

If this is your first go-round on the weight-loss trail (or for anyone else reading this who is new to the game), the key is coming up with a life-time plan, and then planning for that. For many people, there's no going back to the "just eat moderately" protocol that gets recommended (usually by people who have no problem with obesity).

I once thought that obesity/losing weight was like having a cold/getting over a cold: once you get over it, you forget about it.

Nope.
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Re: The Weight-Management Thread

#50

Post by p0rtia » Sun Jul 07, 2019 7:47 am

Just got my annual blood work back from my Doc. Was really pleased--four years of increased focus on and tinkering with what I eat seems to have paid off. Every damn thing dead normal and on the "excellent" side, except for my fasting blood glucose. Since my A1C is great, as was my insulin level, I'm writing off the slightly high FBG as adaptive glucose sparing, which is a common with people who do extended low carb / are fat-adapted (body used to using lots of fat cells for fuel).

I do a lot of fasting. Forty years ago I used to fast for two or three weeks at a time. I like it; the bod likes it. My tinkering over the last couple of years, based on my own experience of 1 + the reading I've done on what length of time in the fasted state gets you the biggest bang in terms of autophagy and weight-loss, has lead me to shorten that up. I now do a bit of intermittent fasting (20/4), some 40 hour fasting (example: Sunday evening to Tuesday noon), and (when in weight-loss mode) quite a lot of 62 hour fasting (example: Sunday evening to Wednesday noon).

Combine that with the moderate carb (50 - 70 grams of complex carbs a day, never ever simple carbs) I am seriously fat-adapted. Nothing like not eating at all to keep the carb count down! :dance:

So as I've said, I am buying into the "weight management as a hormonal issue" as opposed to "weight management as a calories in = calories out" issue. Though, to confuse the issue, I actually count calories, because as a binge eater (in remission, four years), I have to keep a lid on it.

Anyway, I asked my pcp to test both insulin and cortisol this set of labs. Was really happy to see low numbers for both. If the insulin had been high, I would have looked for other reasons for the highish FBG, but I am content as it is.

Fasting is a stress, as Danraft has mentioned. Increased cortisol, and increased oxidative stress are things I don't want for general and specific health care reasons. Another reason I stopped extended fasting was because I didn't want the extra stress on the bod / cortisol. I've been wondering if even my short term fasting would raise levels. Sooo happy to see that it didn't (I was 64 hours fasted when I went in for the labs).

My three health issues have a focal point, which is weight management, so I'm seriously into it, even in maintenance. My freaking BP (one of the issues) has improved over the past six months too, which is awesome. I take meds for it (two kinds), but it is only recently that I've begun to show really good numbers (averaging about 125/70). Even got to reduce on tab I take from 3 a day to 2 a day this spring. So yay!

So that's a bit of me, for the record. Weight management is the world's most anecdotal subject, but sometimes experiences resonate, so hopefully someone finds something useful in there.

:towel:

Another article that I like below, again on the dietary vs body fats. I've burned my bridges and decided to keep protein under 80 grams a day, which means, since I'm low carb, I'll be eating a lot of fats for the rest of my life. Y'know, when I'm eating. I have battling docs that say "No! No! Lower dietary fats!" and "No! No! Lower dietary protein!" Given the test results I got this week, so far so good.

REALLY SORRY that the blog titls is awkwardly politics centered--that has nothing to do with the content of this entry, which is more from the short-term fasting guru, Jason Fung:

Jason Fung: Dietary Fat is Innocent of the Charges Leveled Against It
IN 1948, HARVARD University began a decades-long community-wide prospective study of the diets and habits of the town of Framingham, Massachusetts. Every two years, all residents would undergo screening with blood work and questionnaires. High cholesterol levels in the blood had been associated with heart disease. But what caused this increase? A leading hypothesis was that high dietary fat was a prime factor in raising cholesterol levels. By the early 1960s, the results of the Framingham Diet Study were available. Hoping to find a definitive link between saturated-fat intake, blood cholesterol and heart disease, the study instead found... nothing at all.
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