Diabetes - lets talk

User avatar
sad-cafe
Posts: 991
Joined: Sun Jun 09, 2013 7:32 pm

Diabetes - lets talk

#1

Post by sad-cafe » Thu Jun 20, 2019 10:59 am

last week I was diagnosed with Diabetes. Apparently my blood sugar was 600+ like 3 times

also, looking back on some things I had experiences some lows as well. A few times in my classroom.


I started two different insulins and have been steady in the 200's but need to get it even lower.

I am 52 and had never been told I am a diabetic and with Crohn's disease you can imagine I have had many blood tests. So I would think this new development has been just in the last year.

Anyone have tips or advice? I am sick of having a bruised belly already



User avatar
Chilidog
Posts: 10244
Joined: Mon Jan 09, 2012 11:36 am

Re: Diabetes-lets talk

#2

Post by Chilidog » Thu Jun 20, 2019 12:14 pm

Ouch

:bighug:

About three months ago I was diagnosed as pre-diabetic.

So I’ve been working on cutting all excess carbs from my diet. (Bread, Rice, etc. no more sushi for me :cry: )

As a result, I’ve lost about 25#s

“Diet and exercise,” although I’m sure you’ve heard That already.

The only practical suggestion I can add is to figure out if you have the "dawn effect" and to try to schedule your meds around that.



PaulG
Posts: 593
Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2010 7:06 pm
Location: Dwelling in the suites of my former illness

Re: Diabetes-lets talk

#3

Post by PaulG » Thu Jun 20, 2019 12:19 pm

Diabetes sucks. I've been diabetic for a long time, and it's a pain. My doctor sent me to see a "diabetes councilor" who was a nurse (who was diabetic herself) and gave me lots of useful advice. I also see an endocrinologist every 6-months and he tweaks my insulin prescription as needed. I'm injecting with flexpens and 31 gauge needles, and I haven't had bruising in a long time. What I hate is the blood monitors that require a jab to test. I don't do it as often as I should but it helps get the blood sugar down. And everybody will tell you to exercise. Unfortunately, they're right, it really helps. Just keep a pocket full of root beer barrels for emergencies. And don't get medical advice from the internet.



User avatar
SLQ
Posts: 3073
Joined: Fri Jan 27, 2012 12:33 am

Re: Diabetes-lets talk

#4

Post by SLQ » Thu Jun 20, 2019 12:29 pm

Read the Diabetes Code by Dr. Jason Fung. Please. He’s a nephrologist and has the research and bona fides. He’s had tremendous success in reversing diabetes. There are some videos on YouTube of him speaking for some quick info. Also see idmprogram.com. There is a Facebook page with almost 100,000 members with lots and lots of success stories. It’s a closed group, so you have to join

It **IS** possible to reverse diabetes.


"Try not. Do or do not. There is no try."
-- Yoda

User avatar
RoadScholar
Posts: 8222
Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2011 10:25 am
Location: Baltimore
Occupation: Historic Restoration Woodworker
Contact:

Re: Diabetes-lets talk

#5

Post by RoadScholar » Thu Jun 20, 2019 2:14 pm

From WebMD:

"Although there's no cure for type 2 diabetes, studies show it's possible for some people to reverse it. Through diet changes and weight loss, you may be able to reach and hold normal blood sugar levels without medication.

This doesn't mean you're completely cured. Type 2 diabetes is an ongoing disease. Even if you're in remission, which means you aren't taking medication and your blood sugar levels stay in a healthy range, there's always a chance that symptoms will return. But it's possible for some people to go years without trouble controlling their glucose and the health concerns that come with diabetes.

So how can you reverse diabetes? The key seems to be weight loss. Not only can shedding pounds help you manage your diabetes, sometimes losing enough weight could help you live diabetes-free -- especially if you've only had the disease for a few years and haven't needed insulin."

My only advice is: Don't underestimate it. It killed my son Jared without warning at age 45.


The bitterest truth is healthier than the sweetest lie.
X3

User avatar
p0rtia
Posts: 2992
Joined: Sun Aug 26, 2012 11:44 am

Re: Diabetes-lets talk

#6

Post by p0rtia » Thu Jun 20, 2019 3:06 pm

I'm assuming sad cafe was diagnosed with adult-onset Type 1, yes? Best to clarify, because...well because it's not the same animal as metabolic syndrome style or high-carb style Type 2.


No matter where you go, there you are! :towel:
ImageImageImage

User avatar
Shizzle Popped
Posts: 1337
Joined: Tue Apr 09, 2013 3:54 pm
Location: South of Circle City
Occupation: Semi-Retired

Re: Diabetes-lets talk

#7

Post by Shizzle Popped » Thu Jun 20, 2019 4:26 pm

I landed in the hospital right before Christmas with blood sugar levels over 600 and was diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes. I hadn't really felt good for months but I'd been working like a madman on the new house and thought it was just fallout from that. I was a sugar junkie with my biggest weakness being soda. I drank a LOT of soda when doing physical work and that put me over the edge.

What insulin are you taking and at what dosages? Are you rotating injection sites properly? Not rotating can cause issues with insulin absorption. The fact that you're bruising bothers me a little which is why I ask. I was on 25 units of Lantus at night and 7 units of Novolog before each meal. Luckily, my insurance pays for pens which are much less painful and easier to deal with. Do they have you on Metformin?

The next thing is diet, diet and then diet. They say to eat a balanced diet, which is important for sure, but Carbohydrates are really everything. They had me on a diet of 60 grams of carbs per meal after I left the hospital which is quite doable. Read the labels on EVERYTHING you eat and add it all up. Track what your carb intake is and how that impacts your blood sugar numbers. If your numbers are high, lower your carb intake some more. You need to be under 130 and preferably under 110 but, at least for me, I feel like crap if my numbers drop into the low 80s. I adjust what I eat based on what my blood sugar numbers are before the meal. If they're a little high, I cut my carb intake for that meal. If they're low, I eat a something with a little more carbs. I try to keep my intake fairly steady throughout the day too so that I'm not seeing wild swings.

The bad news is that high sugar foods are off the menu for the short term. Everybody said I would get used to diet soda but it's been six months and I still don't really care for it (except for Boylan's Diet Root beer, which is amazing). French fries, pies, cakes and cookies are the enemy. I haven't had a pasta dish since December. Eating out will be a challenge for a while but if you Google most larger chain restaurants you can generally find the nutrition information online.

The good news is that bacon and butter are now health foods! Just don't tell your doctor that. Most meats, vegetables and a lot of dairy is carb-free or close to it. Pay attention to your condiments too as they can add up really quick. I like ketchup on my burgers or meatloaf but it's around six grams a tablespoon (or is it two tablespoons?) which adds up quickly. Start looking for substitutes for some of the things you eat too. You get to subtract dietary fiber from the overall carbs so things like high fiber breads are your friends. We found soft tortilla shells that net out to 5 grams each which put Taco Tuesday back on the menu. There are some decent salad dressings out there that have very few carbs per serving too.

At 60 grams a meal my typical day looked something like this:
Breakfast: Bacon, eggs, a small bowl of cottage cheese, a small bowl of fruit or a fruit cup and a high fiber english muffin.
Lunch: Tuna, chicken or a small piece of meat, a helping of rice or half a baked potato, a salad with dressing and a few apple slices.
Dinner: Some kind of meat or chicken, starch (rice, potato, corn, etc.), two servings of vegetables.

Keep it simple while you're trying to figure out what you can and can't eat and watch your serving size on anything that has carbs. Stay away from one-pot dishes that are hard to calculate the carb levels per serving. Once you get things under control you can start to branch out and try different things. Stay away from prepared foods as much as possible for now as most of them have a lot of carbs. It's more expensive to eat this way but you'll find that you can eat very well and still enjoy meals.

It will change the way you look at food but it's not the end of the world. My A1C in December was 10.1 and by May it was down to 5.2. They took me off the Novolog before each meal in May which means I don't have to be quite as concerned about exactly when I eat since my numbers don't move around so much. The downside is that I've had to cut my carb intake down to 20 to 30 grams per meal, but it hasn't been as difficult as I thought it would be and I've found that I can put together a meal that's almost completely free of carbs pretty easily. That gives me room to treat myself with something like a candy bar for desert every once in a while.

I was pretty badly overweight when this all started but I've been steadily losing weight without really trying. When I look at food labels now I only pay attention to the carbs but that has altered my diet balance and brought down my overall calorie intake quite a bit. As a result I've lost 65 pounds since Christmas, which helps with the diabetes too.

Anyway, I hope this helps a little.


If Trump was a stopped clock he still wouldn't be right twice a day.

User avatar
Hurtzi
Posts: 437
Joined: Mon Mar 25, 2019 2:52 am

Re: Diabetes-lets talk

#8

Post by Hurtzi » Thu Jun 20, 2019 5:08 pm

Pasta:
try these
https://www.theonlybean.com/

Ketchup :
Cook your own from canned tomatoes. I use 4 tbsp of sugar for one gallon of ketchup.

Sweet beverages:
Just stop to drink them. No substituting with "dietary " drinks.

Foodstuffs industry:
Fuck them.


The "water bear" is the first creature to live on the moon.

User avatar
Shizzle Popped
Posts: 1337
Joined: Tue Apr 09, 2013 3:54 pm
Location: South of Circle City
Occupation: Semi-Retired

Re: Diabetes-lets talk

#9

Post by Shizzle Popped » Thu Jun 20, 2019 5:44 pm

To expand a little, this is how I attacked the problem:

My initial target was to get my blood sugar numbers consistently below 110 (I later lowered that to below 100). I decided it would be easiest to have certain parts of the meal that had little to no carbs that I really didn't have to worry about how much of it I ate. So, for dinner I would have a piece of meat or chicken with no glazes or anything that adds carbs, a couple of servings of vegetables or a salad (stay away from peas and corn though), and then a side that had most of my carbs for the meal. I watched how much of that I ate very closely and altered it based on what my numbers were before the meal. Track how many carbs you had for that meal and then look at what happens to your numbers the next time you test. If your numbers went up, then you probably had too many carbs or if they went down dramatically maybe you can eat a bit more the next time. I say I was eating 60 grams of carbs per meal but it probably varied between 45 and 70 based on where my numbers were before the meal. What you need to do is find out where your baseline is based on where your numbers are. If you're eating a 60 gram meal and your numbers are still running high, cut your meals back to 45 grams and see what happens.

For me, if my numbers before breakfast were high I would cut out the english muffin or the fruit from my breakfast that morning. By lunch my numbers would usually be back down where I wanted them to be. If they were just a little high, I might trade the cottage cheese for a couple of cheese sticks, which don't have any carbs (cottage cheese is something like 4 grams per 1/4 cup). I ate largely the same breakfast with only mild variations for probably two months because it was predictable and it allowed me to get my numbers adjusted at the start of the day. I got to where I could keep my numbers in the 90s probably 80% of the time.

Now that I've cut my carb intake basically in half, I've cut most of the bread out of my diet since that seems to be one thing that almost always screws up my numbers these days. And I've switched from fresh fruit in the morning to no sugar added fruit cups because it's a measured amount of carbs and I know exactly what I'm getting for the meal. Now that I'm starting to get my numbers stabilized a little better under the new diet I may go back to fresh fruit soon.

I guess the short version of what I'm getting at is that you want to eat predictable meals for a while until you learn what your carb intake needs to be at each meal and so that you can adjust accordingly. After a while you'll start to get a feel for what certain foods do to your blood sugar levels and you can start to ease up and try different things. When I first started this I seemed to have a lot of trouble processing rice but that has improved quite a bit over the last few months. Potatoes didn't give me any real trouble for some reason. You may find that potatoes are a problem but rice isn't.

Later on, you'll learn to do the math so that you can break down how large a serving of something like chili you can have. I can't have a large bowl of chili anymore, but I can have a small bowl, no bread, and a large salad. It's different from the way I used to eat but it works.


If Trump was a stopped clock he still wouldn't be right twice a day.

User avatar
Whatever4
Posts: 12321
Joined: Tue Sep 08, 2009 6:36 am
Location: Mainely in the plain
Occupation: Visiting doctors.

Re: Diabetes-lets talk

#10

Post by Whatever4 » Thu Jun 20, 2019 5:55 pm

Damn good advice


"[Moderate] doesn't mean you don't have views. It just means your views aren't predictable ideologically one way or the other, and you're trying to follow the facts where they lead and reach your own conclusions."
-- Sen. King (I-ME)

User avatar
Chilidog
Posts: 10244
Joined: Mon Jan 09, 2012 11:36 am

Re: Diabetes-lets talk

#11

Post by Chilidog » Thu Jun 20, 2019 6:16 pm

SHAMELESS SHILL WARNING
----

My wife is a consultant for Jenny Craig.

Their program is expensive (about $150 to 175/ week. 10 lbs a Month Is doable. ( It took you 20 years and thousands of dollars to put it on)

But, if you follow it, you will lose weight.

They can adjust the program for type 2 as well.

You HAVE to follow it for it to work



User avatar
Shizzle Popped
Posts: 1337
Joined: Tue Apr 09, 2013 3:54 pm
Location: South of Circle City
Occupation: Semi-Retired

Re: Diabetes-lets talk

#12

Post by Shizzle Popped » Thu Jun 20, 2019 6:54 pm

Hurtzi wrote:
Thu Jun 20, 2019 5:08 pm
Pasta:
try these
https://www.theonlybean.com/

Ketchup :
Cook your own from canned tomatoes. I use 4 tbsp of sugar for one gallon of ketchup.

Sweet beverages:
Just stop to drink them. No substituting with "dietary " drinks.

Foodstuffs industry:
Fuck them.
Ooh! Thanks for the tip! I've been looking for a pasta alternative and this looks like a great option. Woohoo! Pasta is back on the menu! :-D


If Trump was a stopped clock he still wouldn't be right twice a day.

User avatar
SLQ
Posts: 3073
Joined: Fri Jan 27, 2012 12:33 am

Re: Diabetes-lets talk

#13

Post by SLQ » Thu Jun 20, 2019 7:14 pm

RoadScholar wrote:
Thu Jun 20, 2019 2:14 pm
From WebMD:

So how can you reverse diabetes? The key seems to be weight loss. Not only can shedding pounds help you manage your diabetes, sometimes losing enough weight could help you live diabetes-free -- especially if you've only had the disease for a few years and haven't needed insulin."

My only advice is: Don't underestimate it. It killed my son Jared without warning at age 45.
According to Dr. Fung, the key is overcoming your body's overproduction of insulin. A side effect of reducing insulin is weight loss.


"Try not. Do or do not. There is no try."
-- Yoda

User avatar
p0rtia
Posts: 2992
Joined: Sun Aug 26, 2012 11:44 am

Re: Diabetes-lets talk

#14

Post by p0rtia » Thu Jun 20, 2019 7:28 pm

:yeah:

My A1C peaked at 7.6. Now 4.9. Weight loss + low carb <50 grams a day or moderate carb <100 grams a day. Routine meals (home + eating out) must be complex carbs. Best choice: foods that are low on the insulin response scale (if you're a big meat eater, that can contribute to insulin resistance too. Schedule festival days for simple carbs once every couple of months.

If you're slim, your best choice is still low carb.

Don't snack.

Excelsior


No matter where you go, there you are! :towel:
ImageImageImage

User avatar
Gregg
Posts: 3219
Joined: Mon Oct 27, 2014 6:09 am
Location: Cincinnati, OH USA
Occupation: We build cars

Re: Diabetes-lets talk

#15

Post by Gregg » Thu Jun 20, 2019 7:44 pm

p0rtia wrote:
Thu Jun 20, 2019 3:06 pm
I'm assuming sad cafe was diagnosed with adult-onset Type 1, yes? Best to clarify, because...well because it's not the same animal as metabolic syndrome style or high-carb style Type 2.

Type 1 is Juvenile Diabetes, you're born with problems with your pancreas and at an early age it doesn't produce enough insulin for your body. This is a big problem because children are not good at either following the lifestyle they need to and they often aren't good at communicating or recognizing life threatening emergencies in their glucose levels They learn, and by necessity by adulthood they've developed lifelong habits that help. It still sucks. Type 1 diabetics are life long insulin dependent.


Type 2 is Adult Onset Diabetes and for a lot of reasons a lot of those lifestyle choices and habits, your body does not efficiently process the (often depressed) levels of insulin that your pancreas produces. After diagnosis, adults are capable of recognizing the symptoms that need immediate action and can adapt their lifestyle, diet and exercise to help accommodate the condition, Insulin is not always required and many patients can take many oral or injected non insulin drugs to control their A1C, which very simplified is a period average of the acute and static finger stick glucose check, its like a 30 day average and is a better check. Sticking you finger has a lot of variables, how long since you ate, what you had, state of your metabolism, time of day.

I'm a type 2 diabetic, I've read and taken classes all about it, I know exactly what to do and I pretty much suck at it. I have managed to get to where readings over 200 are rare, it took a while. I hate it, it makes me tired sometimes. screws up my vision, makes me thirsty all the time and neuropathy has made my feet at the end of the day a problem, as well as taken a lot of my finger agility so I hunt and peck now where I used to type 110 WPM. My A1C was once 13, last check was 5.9. Glucose the high goal is 200 and normal goal around 125 The A1C goal is 7 or some doctors say 6. Mine at one time was rooting for single digits, so its a process.

Those damn folks in Atlanta and Co-Cola are my weakness. Good luck with it and get serious about it, pretty much every thing it does to you is irreversible by the time you notice it bothers you.

Pre Diabetes is a marketing campaign, if your Doctor says you're pre-diabetic, you're diabetic. Take appropriate changes.

Never take medical advice from the internet. I AM a real Doctor....of Business Administration, so don't pay much heed to me.


Honorary Commander, 699th Airborne Assault Dachshund Regiment
Deadly Sausage Dogs from the Sky

User avatar
p0rtia
Posts: 2992
Joined: Sun Aug 26, 2012 11:44 am

Re: Diabetes-lets talk

#16

Post by p0rtia » Thu Jun 20, 2019 8:02 pm

Thanks Greg. I have no doubt you know more about the subject than I do.

But I believe there is a distinction made between Type 2 diabetes as a result of adult metabolic syndrome (weight gain, high blood pressure, increasing blood glucose) and long-term, increasing insulin resistance, and adult onset diabetes that was called "Type 1.5" by the skinny, normal blood pressure, wayyyyy high blood glucose overnight that I was thinking about. A quick google confirms some of this, mentioning both Type 1.5 and "Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults".

I just know from my friend that all the stuff I did to lower my A1C and blood glucose was useless for him. What he had was much more serious, and much harder to treat, let alone send into remission so that drugs were no longer needed.

And I'll let those who are better informed take it from there!


No matter where you go, there you are! :towel:
ImageImageImage

User avatar
Fortinbras
Posts: 2935
Joined: Sun Jan 18, 2015 10:08 am

Re: Diabetes-lets talk

#17

Post by Fortinbras » Thu Jun 20, 2019 8:07 pm

It's worth remembering that, before insulin was marketed as the treatment in 1922, the best medical regimen for diabetes was an Extremely Low-Carb diet.

Yes, it forbids a lot of your favorites, altho - depending on the severity of your diabetes and how conscientious you have been about avoiding carbs - you might be able to cheat once in a great while. Keep in mind the alternative to adopting a new lifestyle is such ugliness as amputations and blindness.



User avatar
Shizzle Popped
Posts: 1337
Joined: Tue Apr 09, 2013 3:54 pm
Location: South of Circle City
Occupation: Semi-Retired

Re: Diabetes-lets talk

#18

Post by Shizzle Popped » Thu Jun 20, 2019 8:09 pm

My daughter was diagnosed Type 1 at the age of 30. It's rare but it happens. The doctors said something about a virus that attacked her pancreas but I got the impression that was just a wild guess.

It took a while to get my numbers down to something approaching normal and when they did come down my vision went haywire for a few weeks. It doesn't happen all the time but I gather it's fairly common. They eventually corrected completely on their own. If nobody has told you to get your eyes checked go do it. Tell them you're a newly diagnosed diabetic and they'll know what to do. They'll look for any problems the diabetes has caused and then can keep an eye out for changes after that.


If Trump was a stopped clock he still wouldn't be right twice a day.

User avatar
sad-cafe
Posts: 991
Joined: Sun Jun 09, 2013 7:32 pm

Re: Diabetes-lets talk

#19

Post by sad-cafe » Thu Jun 20, 2019 9:07 pm

They had to do some testing but they say Type II

I have had pancreatitis 8 times because of where the bad parts from Crohn's are.

I only weigh 140 lbs. I did get up to 150 but the last month I dropped 10 lbs without doing anything (another indicator)

I do need to exercise a lot more and I stopped my pepsi intake. It was a lot I have been married 30 years and there has never been a time were there wasn't a pepsi in the fridge.

When the school year is going on, it was not unusual for me to open 6 cans...BUT...I only drank about 3/4 of it before it got hot.

I am now drinking Iced Tea and will put an Iced Tea maker in my classroom as I have a sink.

It has been an adjustment. Seems like I am either sticking my fingers for blood levels or sticking my belly. I have Fiasp? for the day during 3 meals and then Tresibia at night. After the first week last week the endocrinologist upped the Fiasp from 5 to 8 and the Tresibia from 20 to 25.

It has only been a couple of weeks so I would imagine we will be adjusting levels for a while?



User avatar
Hurtzi
Posts: 437
Joined: Mon Mar 25, 2019 2:52 am

Re: Diabetes-lets talk

#20

Post by Hurtzi » Fri Jun 21, 2019 1:13 am

I assume (and hope) that your ice tea is only herbs, lemon and water.

Any sweeteners - they may contain carbs or not - can be a signal for your body to produce insulin.


The "water bear" is the first creature to live on the moon.

User avatar
Gregg
Posts: 3219
Joined: Mon Oct 27, 2014 6:09 am
Location: Cincinnati, OH USA
Occupation: We build cars

Re: Diabetes-lets talk

#21

Post by Gregg » Fri Jun 21, 2019 8:39 am

p0rtia wrote:
Thu Jun 20, 2019 8:02 pm
Thanks Greg. I have no doubt you know more about the subject than I do.

But I believe there is a distinction made between Type 2 diabetes as a result of adult metabolic syndrome (weight gain, high blood pressure, increasing blood glucose) and long-term, increasing insulin resistance, and adult onset diabetes that was called "Type 1.5" by the skinny, normal blood pressure, wayyyyy high blood glucose overnight that I was thinking about. A quick google confirms some of this, mentioning both Type 1.5 and "Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults".

I just know from my friend that all the stuff I did to lower my A1C and blood glucose was useless for him. What he had was much more serious, and much harder to treat, let alone send into remission so that drugs were no longer needed.

And I'll let those who are better informed take it from there!
:thumbs:

Its all good. I was going on what they told me when I found out I was Type 2. Like I said, I'm a real Doctor. U of Michigan, International Business. And never take medical information from someone who keeps his inhaler next to his lighter and cigarettes and washes down his Metphornin with Mt Dew. (Both habits I have for today anyway, made myself quit)

Also, what someone said about your eyes, good advice. The first hint I had that I was diabetic was wonky eyesight. I have worn glasses for years but just barely, at first just because I was a Pilot and the Army insisted. But my eyesight is what I call "variable" sometimes when my glucose is jumping around. Anyhow, the first Doctor to tell me I needed to look further was my eye doctor, they can tell from something they look at during an exam.

Someone earlier had gotten type 1 and type 2 backwards which was what prompted me to post, and I can't ever seem to use 20 words when I can use 500. or 2,000 :bag:


Honorary Commander, 699th Airborne Assault Dachshund Regiment
Deadly Sausage Dogs from the Sky

User avatar
p0rtia
Posts: 2992
Joined: Sun Aug 26, 2012 11:44 am

Re: Diabetes - lets talk

#22

Post by p0rtia » Fri Jun 21, 2019 8:54 am

LOL, I appreciate that, Gregg. I am not a doctor of anything, though my deference to the opinions of others has more to do with the fact that my Type 2 was (or is, if you prefer) extremely mild. To wit, I was never on even metformin, my FBG never topped 170, and my eyesight--or anything else--was never affected.

I am embarrassed to say in the presence of folks with actual issues with TT that my current FBG of 105-115 (even though I do low carb) bugs me, and I am in the midst of testing to see if it will go lower if I forgo various artificial sweeteners. (FTR, I'm down to erythritol and stevia--unless I am indulging in my poison, which is diet Mountain Dew). I managed three days of zero AS's, and my FBG dropped like a rock. Curses. Did a stevia-only test and it was lowish, but not in the 70s. Next week is erythritol only. And yes, I currently buy into the hormonal view of weight management, and no, I will not let my BG drop to dangerous lows. Everything is relative.


No matter where you go, there you are! :towel:
ImageImageImage

User avatar
Flatpointhigh
Posts: 7956
Joined: Fri Dec 09, 2011 1:05 pm
Location: Hotel California, PH23
Occupation: Voice Actor, Podcaster, I hold a Ph.D in Procrastination.
Contact:

Re: Diabetes - lets talk

#23

Post by Flatpointhigh » Sun Jun 23, 2019 9:16 am

I just recently diagnosed with Type 2. Yippeee... Metaformin.



My Name is...
Daffy Duck.. woo hoo!
Cancer broke me

jemcanada
Posts: 285
Joined: Sat Oct 12, 2013 10:11 am

Re: Diabetes-lets talk

#24

Post by jemcanada » Sun Jun 23, 2019 11:31 am

p0rtia wrote:
Thu Jun 20, 2019 8:02 pm
Thanks Greg. I have no doubt you know more about the subject than I do.

But I believe there is a distinction made between Type 2 diabetes as a result of adult metabolic syndrome (weight gain, high blood pressure, increasing blood glucose) and long-term, increasing insulin resistance, and adult onset diabetes that was called "Type 1.5" by the skinny, normal blood pressure, wayyyyy high blood glucose overnight that I was thinking about. A quick google confirms some of this, mentioning both Type 1.5 and "Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults".

I just know from my friend that all the stuff I did to lower my A1C and blood glucose was useless for him. What he had was much more serious, and much harder to treat, let alone send into remission so that drugs were no longer needed.

And I'll let those who are better informed take it from there!
I’m one of those 1.5 types. I became diabetic in my early thirties and was very fit and not overweight. They actually said they couldn’t figure out what type of diabetic I was and said something like type 1.5. I controlled my diabetes with diet, exercise, and metformin for 20 years. Now I’m insulin dependent and my doctor says I’m becoming resistant to the insulin. I take Janumet twice a day and Jardiance once a day. I take 160 units of Tujeo (twice it’s supposed maximum) and still have glucose levels from 10 to 25 mmol (or from 180 to 400). I take between 10 to 20 units of Novo Rapid insulin with my meals now. I’m happy if my glucose levels are close to 10 mmol now.

I had two serious bouts of cancer with chemo and radiation treatments in that time, so maybe that screwed up my insulin resistance even more.



qbawl
Posts: 533
Joined: Sun Aug 30, 2015 2:58 pm

Re: Diabetes - lets talk

#25

Post by qbawl » Sun Jun 23, 2019 9:30 pm

Long time type 2 diabetic at 73 I have both retinopathy and neuropathy along with kidney issues and heart failure as the result of multiple "silent" (common among diabetics) heart attacks. I was diagnosed in my early 40s. One problem is that in early stages you can be symptom free and that can lead to hit and miss compliance. If you have been diagnosed but still feel good please take it seriously, I wish I had.

Gregg you mentioned foot issues linked to the diabetic neuropathy; I was having lots of problems at night and my then endocrinologist prescribed METHYL-B6-B12 which is classified as a "medical food" it cut my occurrences by at least 95% but my new endocrinologist won't even refill it (my PCP has no objections) so obviously not every one thinks it is useful.

I had a hemorrhage in my left eye that took a good bit of my central vision. Over the years I had a total of 6 Laser procedures, one to stabilize the hemorrhage and the others (on both eyes) were what I call laser grid surgery. Think of literally hundreds of little spot welds to the retina in a spiral pattern that avoids the Macula but covers the rest of the eye. Obviously this is very destructive of the rods and cones and causes problems in bright as well as low light conditions. Apparently they don't do this anymore as the last two times they treated my retinopathy they injected a drug directly into the eye. I don't recall the name of the drug but it is a cancer drug. Yes it is a bit unpleasant as you might imagine but only for a few seconds and it is not destructive like the laser. At this time the left eye is legally blind but the right one corrects to 20/20.



Post Reply

Return to “Science & Technology”