Astronomy and Space

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Notorial Dissent
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Re: Astronomy and Space

#201

Post by Notorial Dissent » Wed May 01, 2019 9:27 pm

And I am sure the conspiraloons are already working themselves in to a frenzy about it. This one's even real, unlike Niberu or planet X or what ever was supposed to wipe us out at least three times so far. Wonder what the flat earthers will have to say about it?
The fact that you sincerely and wholeheartedly believe that the “Law of Gravity” is unconstitutional and a violation of your sovereign rights, does not absolve you of adherence to it.

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Tomtech
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Re: Astronomy and Space

#202

Post by Tomtech » Wed May 01, 2019 9:28 pm

Volkonski wrote:
Sat Apr 13, 2019 1:14 pm
Tiredretiredlawyer wrote:
Sat Apr 13, 2019 12:54 pm
Why two cockpits?
One cockpit is being installed in the right fuselage, with minor modifications, while the other is being used as a flight simulator.
http://www.thespacereview.com/article/3012/1
Weight balance would also be an important consideration since the cockpits are so far from the center of gravity.

I would bet that they weigh everything going into one side and place the same mass in the other.

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RTH10260
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Re: Astronomy and Space

#203

Post by RTH10260 » Thu May 16, 2019 3:40 pm

SciAm just launched some space related articles:
SpaceX's Starlink Could Cause Cascades of Space Junk
Plans for thousands of new communications satellites would revolutionize global telecommunications but also raise risks of disaster in Earth orbit

By Jonathan O'Callaghan on May 13, 2019


https://www.scientificamerican.com/arti ... pace-junk/
Apollo-Era Tremors Reveal a Dynamic, Active Moon
Moonquakes still shake and reshape the lunar surface in ways that could threaten future astronauts and habitats

By Rebecca Boyle on May 13, 2019


https://www.scientificamerican.com/arti ... tive-moon/
From the Lunar Far Side, China’s Rover Reveals Moon’s Hidden Depths
The Chang’e-4 mission appears to have found material excavated from a frozen magma ocean far below the lunar surface

By Jonathan O'Callaghan on May 15, 2019


https://www.scientificamerican.com/arti ... en-depths/
Hyperactive Comets Hint at Origins of Earth’s Oceans
A new study suggests primordial seawater may lurk hidden at the hearts of many comets

By Nola Taylor Redd on May 9, 2019


https://www.scientificamerican.com/arti ... hs-oceans/

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RTH10260
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Re: Astronomy and Space

#204

Post by RTH10260 » Fri May 24, 2019 10:07 pm

Huge success for SpaceX with a first commercial payload successfuly deploed in space.
SpaceX reveals more Starlink info after launch of first 60 satellites
Devin Coldewey@techcrunch / 7 hours ago

Last night’s successful Starlink launch was a big one for SpaceX — its heaviest payload ever, weighed down by 60 communications satellites that will eventually be part of a single constellation providing internet to the globe. That’s the plan, anyway — and the company pulled the curtain back a bit more after launch, revealing a few more details about the birds it just put in the air.

SpaceX and CEO Elon Musk have been extremely tight-lipped about the Starlink satellites, only dropping a few hints here and there before the launch. We know, for instance, that each satellite weighs about 500 pounds, and are a flat-panel design that maximized the amount that can fit in each payload. The launch media kit also described a “Startracker” navigation system that would allow the satellites to locate themselves and orbital debris with precision.

At the fresh new Starlink website, however, a few new details have appeared, alongside some images that provide the clearest look yet (renders, not photographs, but still) of the satellites that will soon number thousands in our skies.


https://techcrunch.com/2019/05/24/space ... atellites/

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RTH10260
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Re: Astronomy and Space

#205

Post by RTH10260 » Fri May 24, 2019 10:08 pm


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Re: Astronomy and Space

#206

Post by RTH10260 » Sun May 26, 2019 12:40 pm

next conspiracy theory - the aliens in marching order ...
Elon Musk Says It's 'So Far, So Good' for SpaceX's 1st 60 Starlink Satellites
By Mike Wall 2 days ago Spaceflight

The spacecraft are apparently doing fine in orbit.

SpaceX's internet-satellite megaconstellation appears to be off to a good start in low-Earth orbit.

The first 60 members of the company's Starlink network launched last night (May 23) atop a Falcon 9 rocket. The satellites deployed smoothly about an hour after liftoff, and they came online shortly thereafter, SpaceX founder and CEO Elon Musk announced via Twitter last night.

Musk gave us another update this afternoon (May 24), tweeting "So far, so good" in response to a follower's question about Starlink's status.

"Krypton thrusters operative, satellites initiating orbit raise every 90 mins," he added in another tweet a bit later. (The satellites deployed at an altitude of 273 miles, or 440 kilometers, and are making their own way to their operational altitude of 342 miles, or 550 km).

A view of SpaceX's first 60 Starlink satellites in orbit, still in stacked configuration, with the Earth as a brilliant blue backdrop on May 23, 2019.

Some lucky skywatchers have even captured glimpses of the Starlink train passing overhead.


https://www.space.com/elon-musk-says-sp ... -well.html

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Volkonski
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Re: Astronomy and Space

#207

Post by Volkonski » Thu Jun 13, 2019 9:23 am

:? :? :?
Earth is approaching the same "meteor swarm" that may have caused an entire forest to explode in 1908

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/earth-is-a ... d=68952472
A swarm of meteors heading towards Earth could have the potential to cause a catastrophic impact, a new study from Western Ontario University says. The so-called Taurid swarm is a recurring event that some scientists believe could have played a role in the biggest Earth impact of modern times, in 1908, when a space rock slammed into Siberia with enough force to destroy an entire forest.

What has become known as the Tunguska explosion of 1908 was so powerful that the blast leveled 80 million trees over an 800-square-mile area. It's considered to be a one-in-1,000-year event, according to Western Ontario University. But while the Tunguska explosion occurred just over a century ago, another such phenomenon could occur much sooner than its 1,000-year expectancy, the researchers say. That's why they're focusing new attention on the Taurid swarm.

The Taurid swarm is a dense cluster of meteors within the Taurid meteor stream. Earth periodically passes through the Taurid swarm, and it is one of the three space phenomenons that could result in a catastrophic collision. Near Earth Objects (NEOs) such as asteroids and meteoroids, as well as comets are the other two potential causes.

The Taurid swarm is created when Earth passes through the debris left behind by Comet Encke, according to NASA. The comet's dust barrels through Earth's atmosphere at 65,000 mph, burns up and creates a meteor shower. This Taurid meteor shower is usually weak, but there are some years where it is more visible, NASA says.
Image

If Tunguska were to happen today it might precipitate a nuclear war.
Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace

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Re: Astronomy and Space

#208

Post by RTH10260 » Thu Jun 27, 2019 12:44 pm

SpaceX Falcon Heavy's pulls off most difficult launch ever but loses core booster
The center core couldn't stick the landing but it was a thrilling nighttime launch for the world's most powerful rocket.

JACKSON RYAN
JUNE 25, 2019 2:39 PM PDT

SpaceX's most difficult launch yet proved to be as complicated as CEO Elon Musk predicted.

After a picture-perfect nighttime launch went off without a hitch, the Falcon Heavy was on its way. However, the center core booster, which was poised to return to land on a drone ship in the Atlantic, missed its mark and crashed into the ocean early in the mission. It wasn't all bad news: SpaceX demonstrated the first reuse and landing of the Heavy's two side rocket boosters.

The world's most powerful rocket launched from Florida's Cape Canaveral in the dead of night, lifting off at 2:30 a.m. ET Tuesday in a dazzling flurry of flame, cutting a trail through the dark. The rideshare mission, known as STP-2, carried 24 satellites into orbit for a handful of different contractors, including the Department of Defense, in addition to NASA, universities and the Planetary Society.

Prior to launch, Musk was calling this one of the most difficult missions SpaceX has ever performed. A number of complex maneuvers were scheduled to take place, including four separate upper-stage engine burns, three separate deployment orbits and a total mission duration of over six hours.

One of the major triumphs was the reuse and landing of the the two side boosters flown on a previous Falcon Heavy mission. The charred metal tubes certainly showed signs of their off-world experience hours before launch, but when they ignited it was business as usual for the Heavy. The boosters landed safely back at the Cape Canaveral Landing Zone at 2:38 a.m ET, a burst of flame lighting up the night in SpaceX's infrared cameras.



https://www.cnet.com/news/spacex-falcon ... e-booster/

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Re: Astronomy and Space

#209

Post by RTH10260 » Mon Jul 22, 2019 10:03 am

Liftoff! India Launches Ambitious Mission to Land at the Moon's South Pole
By Mike Wall

Chandrayaan-2 is expected to arrive in lunar orbit this September.

India is on its way to the moon again — this time, to the lunar surface.

The nation's robotic Chandrayaan-2 mission launched today (July 22) from Satish Dhawan Space Centre, rising off the pad atop a Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle Mark III (GSLV Mk III) rocket at 5:13 a.m. EDT (0913 GMT; 2:43 p.m. local Indian time). The launch came after just over a weeklong delay due to a rocket glitch, and just days after NASA celebrated the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing.

"My dear friends, today is a historical day for space and science technology in India," said K. Sivan, Chairman of the India Space Research Organisation (ISRO), adding that the GSLV Mk III rocket placed Chandrayaan-2 in a better orbit than expected. "It is the beginning of a historical journey of India towards the moon and to land at the place near the south pole, to carry out scientific experiments, to explore the unexplored."

The liftoff kicks off a long and looping deep-space trip. If all goes according to plan, the spacecraft will reach lunar orbit on Sept. 6 and then put a lander-rover duo down near the moon's south pole shortly thereafter


https://www.space.com/india-chandrayaan ... ccess.html

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Re: Astronomy and Space

#210

Post by RTH10260 » Tue Jul 30, 2019 5:57 pm

‘It snuck up on us’: Scientists stunned by ‘city-killer’ asteroid that just missed Earth

NASA confirmed that on July 25, Asteroid 2019 OK passed about 73,000 kilometers from Earth, roughly one-fifth the distance to the moon.

By Allyson Chiu July 26

Alan Duffy was confused. On Thursday, the astronomer’s phone was suddenly flooded with calls from reporters wanting to know about a large asteroid that had just whizzed past Earth, and he couldn’t figure out “why everyone was so alarmed.”

“I thought everyone was getting worried about something we knew was coming,” Duffy, who is lead scientist at the Royal Institution of Australia, told The Washington Post. Forecasts had already predicted that a couple of asteroids would be passing relatively close to Earth this week.

Then, he looked up the details of the hunk of space rock named Asteroid 2019 OK.

“I was stunned,” he said. “This was a true shock.”

This asteroid wasn’t one that scientists had long been tracking, and it had seemingly appeared from “out of nowhere,” Michael Brown, a Melbourne-based observational astronomer, told The Washington Post. According to data from NASA, the craggy rock was large, an estimated 57 to 130 meters wide (187 to 427 feet), and moving fast along a path that brought it within about 73,000 kilometers (45,000 miles) of Earth. That’s less than one-fifth of the distance to the moon and what Duffy considers “uncomfortably close.”

“It snuck up on us pretty quickly,” said Brown, an associate professor in Australia with Monash University’s School of Physics and Astronomy. He later noted, “People are only sort of realizing what happened pretty much after it’s already flung past us.”



https://www.washingtonpost.com/nation/2 ... t-it-time/

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Sterngard Friegen
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Re: Astronomy and Space

#211

Post by Sterngard Friegen » Tue Jul 30, 2019 7:00 pm

Ooops.

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Notorial Dissent
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Re: Astronomy and Space

#212

Post by Notorial Dissent » Wed Jul 31, 2019 4:38 am

Yeah, oops! I don't find their response all that comforting either.
The fact that you sincerely and wholeheartedly believe that the “Law of Gravity” is unconstitutional and a violation of your sovereign rights, does not absolve you of adherence to it.

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RTH10260
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Re: Astronomy and Space

#213

Post by RTH10260 » Fri Aug 02, 2019 5:00 pm

One Search to (Almost) Rule Them All: Hundreds of Hidden Planets Found in Kepler Data
Improved data analysis could substantially increase the total known planets from NASA’s K2 mission, revealing fascinating new worlds and intriguing planetary patterns

By Jonathan O'Callaghan on August 2, 2019


https://www.scientificamerican.com/arti ... pler-data/

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RTH10260
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Re: Astronomy and Space

#214

Post by RTH10260 » Sat Aug 10, 2019 8:53 am

Moss piglets can withstand temperatures as high as 150C and as low as -200C.
Tardigrades: We're now polluting the moon with near indestructible little creatures
by Monica Grady, The Conversation

An Israeli spacecraft called Beresheet almost made it to the moon in April. It took a selfie with the lunar surface in the background, but then lost contact with Earth and presumably crashed onto the lunar surface. Now it's been revealed that the mission was carrying a cargo of dehydrated microscopic lifeforms known as tardigrades.

Beresheet was the first stage of a privately-funded initiative to transfer living DNA to the moon. The project is designed to act as Noah's Ark Mark II, providing a repository from which plants and animals could be regenerated to repopulate the Earth should a catastrophe akin to a flood of biblical proportions overtake the planet.

Whether the project is far-sighted or foolish, what has roused interest is the fact that, as a result of the crash, the tardigrades may now be scattered across the lunar surface. They are hardy creatures and could probably survive on the moon for a long time. Is this a matter of concern? I believe so, but possibly not for the reasons you might think.

Tardigrades are odd little creatures. Measuring up to about half a millimetre long, they have four pairs of stubby legs and a front-end that even the fondest parent couldn't describe as beautiful. Striking, or distinctive, are my adjectives of choice. Moon-faced would be appropriate, given the context of the story—with a rounded, sucker-like structure in the centre that can project outwards, revealing a set of dangerous-looking sharp teeth.


https://phys.org/news/2019-08-tardigrad ... tures.html

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